OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

Post by David C. Barbe » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



This is a bit off topic, however it seems something all of us who scan
negatives face.

It's not obvious to me why negatives have that orange tint, and that
different film manufacturers use different shades.  (You'd think if there
was some specific reason for the orange, they'd all use the same shade.)
What does the orange do for color negatives and color printing?

And does the orange tint distort or limit the range of the other colors that
help form the orange?

Thanks!

    *David Barber*

 
 
 

OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

Post by Taci » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


Quote:>It's not obvious to me why negatives have that orange tint, and that
>different film manufacturers use different shades.

The orange mask is present in color negatives to limit the contrast of the
image on the negative.

Photographic reproduction technologies, whatever they may be, cannot capture
the full range of detail from light to shadow that your eye can perceive.
Photographic films are limited in the range of tones they can capture; color
photographic paper is even more limited.

The function of that orange mask--it isn't actually orange everywhere; its
color changes according to the color of the image on the film--is to reduce the
contrast of the image recorded on the negative sufficiently that it can be
reproduced with good results on color photographic paper. If you attempt to
print a negative which does not have this orange mask onto standard color
paper, the resulting photograph is unacceptably contrasty, and is usually blown
out in the hilights. (This is often the case with prints that are made, for
example, directly from color transparencies, without the use of an
internegative.)

------
Onyx, the game of * exploration; Xero, the industrial magazine
of art, fiction and photography; and online photo gallery--all at
http://www.veryComputer.com/

 
 
 

OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

Post by David C. Barbe » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


Thanks!

    *David Barber*


Quote:> >It's not obvious to me why negatives have that orange tint, and that
> >different film manufacturers use different shades.

> The orange mask is present in color negatives to limit the contrast of the
> image on the negative.

> Photographic reproduction technologies, whatever they may be, cannot
capture
> the full range of detail from light to shadow that your eye can perceive.
> Photographic films are limited in the range of tones they can capture;
color
> photographic paper is even more limited.

> The function of that orange mask--it isn't actually orange everywhere; its
> color changes according to the color of the image on the film--is to
reduce the
> contrast of the image recorded on the negative sufficiently that it can be
> reproduced with good results on color photographic paper. If you attempt
to
> print a negative which does not have this orange mask onto standard color
> paper, the resulting photograph is unacceptably contrasty, and is usually
blown
> out in the hilights. (This is often the case with prints that are made,
for
> example, directly from color transparencies, without the use of an
> internegative.)

> ------
> Onyx, the game of * exploration; Xero, the industrial magazine
> of art, fiction and photography; and online photo gallery--all at
> http://www.veryComputer.com/

 
 
 

OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

Post by Mark Jones-Lake » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


This explanation is only partly correct. Film manufactures can't make
perfect colour dyes & the mask is to help compensate for the slightly
incorrect colour in the dyes used when doing subtractive printing. If you
have a look at colour transparency film it has less of a mask because it is
made for direct viewing & our eyes can compensate slightly. Additive colour
printing (printing from transparency) is a whole other ball game in the way
the dye layers are arranged on photographic paper.

--
Cheers
Major Panic


Quote:> >It's not obvious to me why negatives have that orange tint, and that
> >different film manufacturers use different shades.

> The orange mask is present in color negatives to limit the contrast of the
> image on the negative.

> Photographic reproduction technologies, whatever they may be, cannot
capture
> the full range of detail from light to shadow that your eye can perceive.
> Photographic films are limited in the range of tones they can capture;
color
> photographic paper is even more limited.

> The function of that orange mask--it isn't actually orange everywhere; its
> color changes according to the color of the image on the film--is to
reduce the
> contrast of the image recorded on the negative sufficiently that it can be
> reproduced with good results on color photographic paper. If you attempt
to
> print a negative which does not have this orange mask onto standard color
> paper, the resulting photograph is unacceptably contrasty, and is usually
blown
> out in the hilights. (This is often the case with prints that are made,
for
> example, directly from color transparencies, without the use of an
> internegative.)

> ------
> Onyx, the game of * exploration; Xero, the industrial magazine
> of art, fiction and photography; and online photo gallery--all at
> http://www.veryComputer.com/

 
 
 

OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

Post by Bob Shomle » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


Quote:>Film manufactures can't make perfect colour dyes & the mask is to help
>compensate for the slightly incorrect colour in the dyes used when
>doing subtractive printing.

There's a brief explanation of this at

  http://www.photo.net/photo/orange-negative-mask.html

--
Bob Shomler
http://www.shomler.com/gallery.htm

 
 
 

OT: Why to negatives have that orange tint?

Post by dolly.. » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


The negative/ positive color print process(invented by Kodak) is at best a
failure in
reproducing the color of a subject. Colors change. The general rule is that
reds and yellows go orange and lighter, blues and greens go darker and more
degraded. As an
attempt to correct this natural  dye failure, Kodak added that orange mask.
It is only slightly successful. It is sort of ironic that their first
effort, Kodachrome,introduced  about 1936, still gives the best color
reproduction. Other transparency films are not as good. Negative films and
photo paper (combined) are bad.
George