Monitor Gamma

Monitor Gamma

Post by J Kirby Inwo » Fri, 12 Nov 1999 04:00:00



Only if you object to going sterile.

Quote:>>Ross Fenmore hypothesizes:
> I've always set the contrast on my monitor to maximum. Is that bad?
>> Ross

Free web site summission services http://www.kirwood.com/stuff/submit.htm
_________________________________________________________________________
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All Creative Services from Concept to Completion
ads, brochures, copy writing, design, web site design, repair, marketing and promotion


 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by Ross Fenmor » Fri, 12 Nov 1999 04:00:00


Sterile? I've been sitting half-a-foot in front of a 21 inch monitor,
14 hours a day, for the last 5 years, and no problems. The wife just
had 18-ounce quintuplets joined at the hip, so I'm more than adequate
in that area, thank you very much. Sheesh! You alarmists.

Ross



>Only if you object to going sterile.

>>>Ross Fenmore hypothesizes:
>> I've always set the contrast on my monitor to maximum. Is that bad?
>>> Ross
>Free web site summission services http://www.kirwood.com/stuff/submit.htm
>_________________________________________________________________________
>J Kirby Inwood
>Kirwood Advertising and Creative Services
>http://www.kirwood.com

>All Creative Services from Concept to Completion
>ads, brochures, copy writing, design, web site design, repair, marketing and promotion




 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by J Kirby Inwo » Sat, 13 Nov 1999 04:00:00


How do you explain your hairy palms???

Ross Fenmore hypothesizes:

>> Sterile? I've been sitting half-a-foot in front of a 21 inch monitor,
>> 14 hours a day, for the last 5 years, and no problems. The wife just
>> had 18-ounce quintuplets joined at the hip, so I'm more than adequate
>> in that area, thank you very much. Sheesh! You alarmists.

>> Ross



>> >Only if you object to going sterile.

>> >>>Ross Fenmore hypothesizes:
>> >> I've always set the contrast on my monitor to maximum. Is that bad?
>> >>> Ross
>> >Free web site summission services http://www.kirwood.com/stuff/submit.htm
>> >_________________________________________________________________________
>> >J Kirby Inwood
>> >Kirwood Advertising and Creative Services
>> >http://www.kirwood.com

>> >All Creative Services from Concept to Completion
>> >ads, brochures, copy writing, design, web site design, repair, marketing and promotion



_________________________________________________________________________

Free web site submission services http://www.kirwood.com/stuff/submit.htm
J Kirby Inwood
Kirwood Advertising and Creative Services
http://www.kirwood.com
All Creative Services from Concept to Completion
ads, brochures, copy writing, design, web site design & repair, marketing and promotion

 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by Timo Autiokar » Sat, 13 Nov 1999 04:00:00




Quote:>surely one doesn't keep the contrast set to 100%?

I do keep it at maximum, why not?  It is the range and with CRT monitors that
is not very good (large) in the first place.

It depends of course on the interior lighting level. One way to adjust it is
to view a good large photo that was taken on a bright sunny day and set it so
that it gives the appearance of a bright sunny day.

Timo Autiokari
http://www.pp.clinet.fi/~timothy/aim/index.htm

 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by Mush_roome » Sun, 14 Nov 1999 04:00:00


 LOL!!!

Ed


> Internet *.

> Ross



> >How do you explain your hairy palms???

> >Ross Fenmore hypothesizes:
> >>> Sterile? I've been sitting half-a-foot in front of a 21 inch monitor,
> >>> 14 hours a day, for the last 5 years, and no problems. The wife just
> >>> had 18-ounce quintuplets joined at the hip, so I'm more than adequate
> >>> in that area, thank you very much. Sheesh! You alarmists.

> >>> Ross

 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by Lars Ekdah » Mon, 15 Nov 1999 04:00:00


At http://www.pp.clinet.fi/~timothy/aim/index.htm the recommendation is 100
contrast. The purpose of the AIM site is to provide help in setting up an
accurate desktop image manipulation system for digital photographic images

Lars Ekdahl at http://www.ekdahl.org/digital.htm

> The Adobe setup on 5.0 (and I assume 5.5) insists on setting the gamma
> for my Windows machine.  This works wonderfully, and I was able to set it
> exclusively for use with weg graphics.  However, in the wizard setup, it
> asks the user to turn up the contrast to 100% and adjust the brightness
> until the square in the middle turns dark (but not black).  I dod this,
> but surely one doesn't keep the contrast set to 100%?  I never go past
> 75% on my EIZO monitor.  The brightness is also never past 50 either.  I
> turned the settings for my monitor back to where I usually have them
> during the day.  Is this optimal?  Does anybody have any comment on how
> they set up their monitor?  I am only interested in creating graphics and
> photos for screen design (Internet).

> Regards -

> RS

> --
> Ross Snowden D. - "Don't have a nice day!"

> PGP Public Key: http://www.snafu.de/~r.snowden/pub_key.asc
> A169 CCED 4F9E EC05 5626  8DEA B36C 1E88 F31C C28C

 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by Bob Wheele » Mon, 15 Nov 1999 04:00:00


There is always confusion because of the names
"brightness" and "contrast." Better names are
"black point" and "range." The range should be set
to its maximum, and the black point should be set
to the point at which a non-black tone is just
visible. The full capabilities of the monitor will
not be utilized if the range is not maximized. If
you are serious, you should calibrate your
scanner, monitor, and printer. One of the least
expensive ways to do this is to use Monaco EZColor
-- see their site.


> At http://www.pp.clinet.fi/~timothy/aim/index.htm the recommendation is 100
> contrast. The purpose of the AIM site is to provide help in setting up an
> accurate desktop image manipulation system for digital photographic images

> Lars Ekdahl at http://www.ekdahl.org/digital.htm

> > The Adobe setup on 5.0 (and I assume 5.5) insists on setting the gamma
> > for my Windows machine.  This works wonderfully, and I was able to set it
> > exclusively for use with weg graphics.  However, in the wizard setup, it
> > asks the user to turn up the contrast to 100% and adjust the brightness
> > until the square in the middle turns dark (but not black).  I dod this,
> > but surely one doesn't keep the contrast set to 100%?  I never go past
> > 75% on my EIZO monitor.  The brightness is also never past 50 either.  I
> > turned the settings for my monitor back to where I usually have them
> > during the day.  Is this optimal?  Does anybody have any comment on how
> > they set up their monitor?  I am only interested in creating graphics and
> > photos for screen design (Internet).

> > Regards -

> > RS

> > --
> > Ross Snowden D. - "Don't have a nice day!"

> > PGP Public Key: http://www.snafu.de/~r.snowden/pub_key.asc
> > A169 CCED 4F9E EC05 5626  8DEA B36C 1E88 F31C C28C

--

        ECHIP, Inc.
 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by Chris C » Mon, 15 Nov 1999 04:00:00




> At http://www.pp.clinet.fi/~timothy/aim/index.htm the recommendation is 100
> contrast. The purpose of the AIM site is to provide help in setting up an
> accurate desktop image manipulation system for digital photographic images

Unfortunately that site is run by a well known net.kook.
Don't believe anything posted there.

Chris

 
 
 

Monitor Gamma

Post by PFig » Tue, 16 Nov 1999 04:00:00


Quote:>I go by what looks best. Max contrast looks best to me. I've got
>monitors that are still working fine after years of use. You might
>want to contact the folks who made your monitor and ask them what they
>think.

There are specific numbers in terms of white point color temperature, gamma and
overall brightness that need to be met in order for you monitor to be
considered "calibrated" to one of the industry standards (usually D-50 or D-65
and either Gamma 1.8 or 2.2). The exact level of the controls for brightness
and contrast will vary from display to display depending on many factors,
including the age, model, and size of the monitor. The ambient lighting will
greatly affect which standard looks the best and give the best matching to
printed output.
 
 
 

1. Monitor Gamma and Picture Gamma

There has been much discussion about Gamma on this list lately, a
topic of some confusion because there is Monitor Gamma and Picture
Gamma, and the two are not the same.

Theoretically, a perfect monitor could be built, where pure red shows
as pure red, pure green as pure green, etc.; however, because the
components that are used to build electronic equipment are highly
inaccurate, a perfect monitor is only theoretical.

The actual values of resistors, capacitors, and coils that go into a
piece of electronics vary greatly from their stated values. For
example, a higher-grade 3,000 ohm resistor can vary in value from
2,850 to 3,150 ohms. Standard resistors have a 10% tolerance. The
value of a capacitor can vary from +50% to -20% of its rated value.
Then there are factors such as stray capacitance, wire resistiance,
and inductance caused by the current to contend with.

So, while the design engineer says this circuit will do this, the
resultant application of that design might not, and they add variable
components to allow "tweaking". Instead of having a 3,000 ohm resistor
in some part of the circuit, they might use a 2,500 ohm one along with
an adjustable 250 to 750 ohm one.

The whole point of this is that your monitor is not going to be
perfect, even when it is new, and as it ages, the values of its
components (especially capacitors) will change.

Adjusting your monitor gamma is a way of tweaking it so pure red show
as pure red, etc. It also is used to establish a uniform grayscale.
This can be done completely independently of your graphics program,
and needs to be repeated periodically to compensate to component
aging.

On the other hand, if you use a program like Paint Shop Pro to adjust
the gamma value of a picture, you actually change the palette values
of that picture. One way to see this is to compare the palettes of a
picture at different gamma value adjustments (double-click on the
foreground or background color box or actually open the Jasc-format
palettes in a text editor).

Calibrating the gamma of your monitor just changes the way you view
pictures, not someone else's view. It's becoming the norm for PC
monitors to include gamma adjustment (I believe that it has been built
into Macs for some time, and UNIX). A good package will allow you to
set the values for red, green, and blue independently, along with
grayscale. If your monitor does not include this capability, then I
would search out one of the web sites that have been set up to handle
this, and not foing it from within a paint program.

I have found that I get a good match between my scanner, my printer,
and my monitor since I did the calibration.

Adjusting the gamma value of a picture can be useful for "tweaking"
its appearance, but remember that you are actually changing the colors
when you do so.

co

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