Combining Scans

Combining Scans

Post by LLutt » Thu, 27 Jan 2000 04:00:00



I just got around to experimenting with Mike Engles recommendation using Layers
Options Sliders to combine an overexposed and underexposed scan from last week.
It is very interesting. I tried the Normal, Exclusion and Difference Modes. As
far as I can tell though, or at least I haven't figured out how to do it - can
you blend and combine only the dark area of one image with only the light area
of the other image? It seems like you still have to mask out the bad area of
one image.

Anyone with experience using this method? I tried to email Mike but his posted
address must not be accessible by AOL or he changes his email address on his
postings.
Lynn Lutton

 
 
 

Combining Scans

Post by Mike Engle » Thu, 27 Jan 2000 04:00:00



> I just got around to experimenting with Mike Engles recommendation using Layers
> Options Sliders to combine an overexposed and underexposed scan from last week.
> It is very interesting. I tried the Normal, Exclusion and Difference Modes. As
> far as I can tell though, or at least I haven't figured out how to do it - can
> you blend and combine only the dark area of one image with only the light area
> of the other image? It seems like you still have to mask out the bad area of
> one image.

> Anyone with experience using this method? I tried to email Mike but his posted
> address must not be accessible by AOL or he changes his email address on his
> postings.
> Lynn Lutton


Hello

The sliders in the options dialogue are a form of selection.
You can work on the overlayer or the underlayer. There is a limit to
this that will result in banding if the difference between the scans is
too large. If you turn off the back ground layer, you can view the
effect of the sliders as they act a selection masks. You can also work
in the RGB channels to fine tune the blending of colours.

It is quite easy to work out my true e-mail address.

Mike Engles

 
 
 

Combining Scans

Post by doug nels » Thu, 27 Jan 2000 04:00:00


another question about combining scans (though for different reason):

i have two prints of the exact same negative. negative is long gone. each
print has some things i want to combine into a final image, but the prints
are grossly different in size, and rotated differently.

i used the measure tool, two points of reference, and rotate/arbitrary to
get them both to the same rotation, and the same measure tool and my
calculator to change the scale to match.

this seemed like far too much work, plus each transform degrades the image.
does photoshop have a shorter way of performing this compound
transformation? like transforming a picture based on the measure tool
setting compared to the same tool in another picture?

-- doug nelson
==============================
http://fenchurch.org/~killjoy

 
 
 

Combining Scans

Post by Ross » Thu, 27 Jan 2000 04:00:00


You can rotate and scale at the same time with Transform -> Numeric.
The rotation measured by the Measure tool will be entered
automatically. Use Unsharp Mask to regain some of the sharpness lost
by interpolation.You'll need to make the Background layer a normal
layer for Transform. You can also calculate the difference in size and
rescan at different resolutions.

Ross



>another question about combining scans (though for different reason):

>i have two prints of the exact same negative. negative is long gone. each
>print has some things i want to combine into a final image, but the prints
>are grossly different in size, and rotated differently.

>i used the measure tool, two points of reference, and rotate/arbitrary to
>get them both to the same rotation, and the same measure tool and my
>calculator to change the scale to match.

>this seemed like far too much work, plus each transform degrades the image.
>does photoshop have a shorter way of performing this compound
>transformation? like transforming a picture based on the measure tool
>setting compared to the same tool in another picture?

>-- doug nelson
>==============================
>http://fenchurch.org/~killjoy

 
 
 

Combining Scans

Post by doug nels » Fri, 28 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

>You can rotate and scale at the same time with Transform -> Numeric.
>The rotation measured by the Measure tool will be entered
>automatically. Use Unsharp Mask to regain some of the sharpness lost
>by interpolation.You'll need to make the Background layer a normal
>layer for Transform. You can also calculate the difference in size and
>rescan at different resolutions.

i got the rotate part, but how does it know what to scale to (or from)?
i'm aware of the fact that you can enter multiple values, but how do you
get scale entered in as well as rotation angle?

-- doug nelson
==============================
http://fenchurch.org/~killjoy

 
 
 

Combining Scans

Post by Ross » Fri, 28 Jan 2000 04:00:00


I'm not entirely sure what you're asking. I don't know of a way to get
PS to do the math for you if you're scaling one image to match another
based on measurements in both. It's not a requirement I see too often,
but it's a quick calculation that shouldn't be too difficult.

Ross




>>You can rotate and scale at the same time with Transform -> Numeric.
>>The rotation measured by the Measure tool will be entered
>>automatically. Use Unsharp Mask to regain some of the sharpness lost
>>by interpolation.You'll need to make the Background layer a normal
>>layer for Transform. You can also calculate the difference in size and
>>rescan at different resolutions.

>i got the rotate part, but how does it know what to scale to (or from)?
>i'm aware of the fact that you can enter multiple values, but how do you
>get scale entered in as well as rotation angle?

>-- doug nelson
>==============================
>http://fenchurch.org/~killjoy

 
 
 

1. Suggestions for combining scanned and digital picture wrt similar grain

I've been browsing around this NG and around the web for a solution to
this particular problem:  

I have two pictures, a scanned photograph (4x6 picture scanned at 300dpi
on
a Canon FB600U USB scanner) and a picture taken with a Canon Powershot
S30
at full resolution (3 megapixel, 2something x 1something).

Scanned:  My wife's softball team, taken with (what appears to be) 400
ASA film. Picture was taken about 7:00pm in the summer so late day light
and was also taken with a flash.  The shirts, which are red, are fairly
bright
and the white lettering is actually ghosted since it's over exposed a
bit.

Digital:  Two people from my wife's softball team who weren't at the
final game.  The picture was taken at around 6:00 on an overcast day
without a flash.

Someone decided that since I know something about computers that I would
be the one to combine them.  

I've been able to use masking to remove the two missing players and paste
them in as a new layer on the team photo.  

I've also been able to play with burning and dodging to get the shirts
and letters to similar colors/brightness.

The two biggest problems I have:  free rotating and matching graininess.

The scanned picture is grainier than the digital picture.  I know there
are methods for removing some grain, but what's a good method for adding
or matching grain?  

Free rotate:  I had thought PSP7 had a free rotate feature (as in, grab
the selection and rotate).  Is this not the case?  It seems the only way
to do it is to specify values which is not as efficient, IMHO.

Any help on these? I'd be more interested in help with the grain issue.

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