Help needed by IBM user

Help needed by IBM user

Post by Steve Wend » Mon, 11 Nov 1996 04:00:00



This is a dumb question, but I'll go for it anyway.

I operate from an IBM-compatible PC, and have no Mac experience.  I am
creating an image collection of old photos of the 100+ year old prison I
work in, for the purposes of historic preservation and also for
distribution to interested parties on a single CD-ROM.

My question:  can Mac's read .jpg (the format I'm saving all images as)
just as readily as an IBM can?  I don't want to create a CD unreadable
by mac owners.  

While I'm at it, do you have any brainstorms regarding creating an
easy-to-use index for the 1000+ image collection?  I'm considering
suggesting to users that they access the collection through their web
browser, and using an HTML index that I plan to create.  The .txt file
(can macs read the .txt extension?)
will allow the user to hyperlink to the appropriate image, and back
again.  Certainly easier than opening images individually in a viewer
program!  My problem is that I'm not familiar with the mac directory
structure.  With an IBM I would include  a reference to, let's say,
file:///D|/buildings/school4 to reference a specific image in the
collection.  Would this scheme work with a mac too?  

Of course, I'm assuming the d: drive is the CD-ROM, but what if it
ain't?  

I know I'm presuming on your expertise, but I'm sort of lost on this
subject area.

Any help appreciated!

Thanks.
Steve Wendl

Anamosa, Iowa

 
 
 

Help needed by IBM user

Post by David Laws » Mon, 11 Nov 1996 04:00:00



> This is a dumb question, but I'll go for it anyway.

> I operate from an IBM-compatible PC, and have no Mac experience.  I am
> creating an image collection of old photos of the 100+ year old prison I
> work in, for the purposes of historic preservation and also for
> distribution to interested parties on a single CD-ROM.

> My question:  can Mac's read .jpg (the format I'm saving all images as)
> just as readily as an IBM can?  I don't want to create a CD unreadable
> by mac owners.  

Yes -- if we couldn't read .jpg, we wouldn't be able to surf the web,
among other things... I don't know of any graphics format that Windows
PC's can read that Macs can't.

Quote:> While I'm at it, do you have any brainstorms regarding creating an
> easy-to-use index for the 1000+ image collection?  I'm considering
> suggesting to users that they access the collection through their web
> browser, and using an HTML index that I plan to create.  The .txt file
> (can macs read the .txt extension?)
> will allow the user to hyperlink to the appropriate image, and back
> again.  Certainly easier than opening images individually in a viewer
> program!  My problem is that I'm not familiar with the mac directory
> structure.  With an IBM I would include  a reference to, let's say,
> file:///D|/buildings/school4 to reference a specific image in the
> collection.  Would this scheme work with a mac too?  

No, with the Mac you don't specify volumes with a letter. You specify them
with a name, like "Macintosh HD" or "My Quantum 1280f" or "Marquez" or
whatever the hell you want. Your CD will appear with a name like "Prison
CD-ROM" or whatever you choose to name it on the Mac desktop. Then the URL
would look like this:

<file:///Prison%20CD-ROM/buildings/school4> (note the substitution of %20
for the space)

In the DOS world, the CD-ROM drive will usually be drive D:, but
definitely not always. You might have several indexes (one for Macs, one
for PC's with the CD-ROM at D:, one for PC's with the CD-ROM at E:, etc.)
that are all the same except the links are different as appropriate. Once
you've created one index, it will be very easy to create the new ones if
your text editor is any good.

Macs can recognize text files just fine, although the schemes for
end-of-line are different among Macs, DOS and Unix. You'll need to create
separate text files if you want users who don't know about text-file
translation to open them and have them look right.

Hope this helps,

David
_______________

David Lawson           University of Washington


 
 
 

Help needed by IBM user

Post by Jan Steinma » Mon, 11 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Hi Steve. You should probably do your mastering on a Mac. Cross-platform
support on Wintel ranges from "poor" to "non-existant." Using a Mac and
TOAST CD mastering software, you can make a dual-filesystem disk with ease
that will fully support Mac users without Wintel constraints.


> My question:  can Mac's read .jpg...
> just as readily as an IBM can?  I don't want to create a CD unreadable
> by mac owners.

Macs read JPEGs just fine, but there's a difference bew* "readable" and
"enticing." If I get a CD-ROM that is full of gray icons with names like
JPG01247.JPG, I usually send it back.

Quote:> While I'm at it, do you have any brainstorms regarding creating an
> easy-to-use index for the 1000+ image collection?  I'm considering
> suggesting to users that they access the collection through their web
> browser, and using an HTML index that I plan to create...

This works okay, but

Quote:> ...The .txt file
> (can macs read the .txt extension?)
> will allow the user to hyperlink to the appropriate image, and back
> again.  Certainly easier than opening images individually in a viewer
> program!  My problem is that I'm not familiar with the mac directory
> structure.  With an IBM I would include  a reference to, let's say,
> file:///D|/buildings/school4 to reference a specific image in the
> collection.  Would this scheme work with a mac too?

> Of course, I'm assuming the d: drive is the CD-ROM, but what if it
> ain't?

It ain't. Mac's aren't saddled with ridiculous user-mappings for devices.
CD-ROMs appear on the desk-top as named volumes.

As for HTML, you should ALWAYS use relative addressing for links, and you
should leave the protocol "file:" off. That way, your CD will work even
with a server. So in your case, if the top level of your CD is your "root"
directory, your link should be "buildings/school4.jpg". You can create
cross-links using ".." to refer to the containing directory, so if you had
an index in "buildings" you could cross-link to one in "interiors" like
this: "../interiors/school4.jpg"

If you have extra funds for this project, you will get it back many times
over by paying a consultant to help you with this stuff!

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Help needed by IBM user

Post by Brett L. Kessl » Mon, 11 Nov 1996 04:00:00


Steve,

Quote:> This is a dumb question, but I'll go for it anyway.
> [....]

It's not a dumb question, but it does illustrate the fact that many people
are surprised to hear just how easy the Mac is to use.  Here come the
answers, as best I can:

Quote:> My question:  can Mac's read .jpg (the format I'm saving all images as)
> just as readily as an IBM can?  I don't want to create a CD unreadable
> by mac owners.  

Sure they can.  The difference is that Macs don't use those three-letter
extensions to identify what type of file it is, though it may be slightly
helpful to us humans.  Every Mac file has a four-letter Creator Code and a
four-letter File Type field which is set by the program which creates it.
Please note that Creator Codes and File Types are case-sensitive.

For example, a GIF file has a File Type of GIFf, a JPEG file has a File
Type of JPEG, a Word file has a File Type of WDBN (WorD BiNary, I think).
In any case, that is independent of the Creator Code.

In that case, Adobe Photoshop has a Code of 8BIM, Graphic Converter has a
Code of GKON, etc.

These items are normally inaccessible to the end-user, though there are
utilities to let you muck about with them.

My suggestion: copy all of the files to a Mac, and set their creator codes
to 8BIM and their file type to JPEG with a utility like FileTyper or Snitch
(available for download from most Mac FTP sites).  Windoze machines ignore
this information, and Macs like it a whole lot better when they're present.

Quote:> While I'm at it, do you have any brainstorms regarding creating an
> easy-to-use index for the 1000+ image collection?  I'm considering
> suggesting to users that they access the collection through their web
> browser, and using an HTML index that I plan to create.  The .txt file
> (can macs read the .txt extension?)

Same thing as above - the extension doesn't matter.  But the File Type for
text files is (are you ready?) - TEXT.  I would set the Creator Code to
ttxt if the files are under 32K, which will open the file with the Mac's
standard text editor SimpleText.  If they're over 32K, my suggestion is to
set the Creator to R*ch for BBEdit.  On the other hand, if you want the
user to open the file into Netscape with a simple double-click, I'd set the
Creator to MOSS.

Quote:> will allow the user to hyperlink to the appropriate image, and back
> again.  Certainly easier than opening images individually in a viewer
> program!  My problem is that I'm not familiar with the mac directory
> structure.  With an IBM I would include  a reference to, let's say,
> file:///D|/buildings/school4 to reference a specific image in the
> collection.  Would this scheme work with a mac too?  

Sure thing, but you're always better off using relative links instead of
absolute.  For example, if your HTML file is in the root directory, and all
of your images are in an "images" subdirectory, use "images/school4.jpg"
instead of "file:///images/school4.jpg".  That way if you move files
around, nothing gets accidentally misplaced.

Quote:> Of course, I'm assuming the d: drive is the CD-ROM, but what if it
> ain't?  

There's no such thing as drive letters on the Mac.  Every single disk,
whether a floppy, a hard drive, a Zip disk, or whatever, are identified by
name.  That's another good reason to use relative URLs instead of absolute.

If you need more help, feel free to ask.
 _____ _____  _____ _____ _____                       _______________
|  _  \  _  \|  ___>__ __>__ __>   Owner             |      ___      |

|_____/__|\__>_____> |_|   |_|     New York City     |-oooO-(_)-Oooo-|

 
 
 

Help needed by IBM user

Post by Call » Fri, 15 Nov 1996 04:00:00



>This is a dumb question, but I'll go for it anyway.
>I operate from an IBM-compatible PC, and have no Mac experience.  I am
>creating an image collection of old photos of the 100+ year old prison I
>work in, for the purposes of historic preservation and also for
>distribution to interested parties on a single CD-ROM.
>My question:  can Mac's read .jpg (the format I'm saving all images as)
>just as readily as an IBM can?  I don't want to create a CD unreadable
>by mac owners.  

Steve -
Macs can read JPG ... no problem with that.  and you don't have
to worry about the differing directory structures either.
    When you get to the point of creating the CD-ROM, the
mastering software takes over and creates the files so that you
will have either  MAC, PC, or both styles of access.
   Mastering software will also take your directory structure and
create the proper codes for either system.  they may be pointing
to the same image, but neither computer type will be aware that
they are sharing space with the "evil empire's" machines.

  All you have to do is get good scans, JPG them, and provide
good searchable descriptions.   You might want to mosey over to
the CDROM discussions and ask about the available software
for managing large collections of photos.

Callie


http://www.writepage.com        | Keeper of the HTML Flame

 
 
 

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