Color Flatbed Scanner info request

Color Flatbed Scanner info request

Post by Donna M. Pai » Thu, 11 Nov 1993 03:34:25



A few weeks ago a coworker gave me some articles talking about experiences
with different color flatbed scanners.  In particular, someone had rave
reviews about a scanner called La Cie (sp?).  I stupidly misplaced the
articles.  Does anyone have any info about this particular scanner, or
comments about other color flatbed scanners they've used?  I'm looking
for a scanner with at least 600dpi resolution, if possible 1200dpi, in
the $1000 range.  The article about the La Cie scanners mentioned that
they occasionally go on sale for around $1000.  I've never seen La Cie
scanners advertised, and I'm wondering if I have the name wrong or if
they are marketed under a different name in the US.

I don't get a chance to read these groups very often, so e-mail is
preferred.  I'll post any replies that I get if there is enough interest.

thanks,
Donna

 
 
 

Color Flatbed Scanner info request

Post by Bosai » Sun, 14 Nov 1993 15:44:21


Lemme just get my La Cie catalog here... Okay, here goes: La Cies Silver
Scanner II has a resolution of 1600 dpi.  That makes it a good 400 dpi
higher than the most others.  It's also a one pass scanner, as opposed to
a 3 pass (RGB) like most tohers.  They give sample scans of the four
leading brands (Agfa Arcus, HP Scanjey IIc, Microtek Scanmaker II and La
Cie Silverscaner II) and of course the La Cie image looks the best.  
Whether or not that is due to the scan or the print, I can't tell you.  I
can tell you it runs for $2099, which is about $700 more than I spent on
a Scanmaker II by Microtek.  If the money wasn't such a big concern I
would have gone for the La Cie.  $700 doesn't justify circumstantial
quality (which can arguable be corrected with something like Cachet,
anyways) and an extra 400 dpi (at 1200 the resolution is so immense as it
is, I'm not really convinced that the extra 400 would be noticeable, but
My God! can you imagine the space a 24 bit 1600 dpi image would take up?!).

La Cie's toll free number is 800.999.0170.  Microteks number is 213.321.2121

Hope that was useful,

Bosaiya


: A few weeks ago a coworker gave me some articles talking about experiences
: with different color flatbed scanners.  In particular, someone had rave
: reviews about a scanner called La Cie (sp?).  I stupidly misplaced the
: articles.  Does anyone have any info about this particular scanner, or
: comments about other color flatbed scanners they've used?  I'm looking
: for a scanner with at least 600dpi resolution, if possible 1200dpi, in
: the $1000 range.  The article about the La Cie scanners mentioned that
: they occasionally go on sale for around $1000.  I've never seen La Cie
: scanners advertised, and I'm wondering if I have the name wrong or if
: they are marketed under a different name in the US.

: I don't get a chance to read these groups very often, so e-mail is
: preferred.  I'll post any replies that I get if there is enough interest.

: thanks,
: Donna


 
 
 

Color Flatbed Scanner info request

Post by William G. Dubuq » Mon, 15 Nov 1993 01:48:48


This months MacWorld (Nov) has a feature article which reviews color flatbed
scanners under $2000. It explains the technology and compares the scanners
based on a number of objective and subjective criteria. The editors choices
were the La Cie Silverscanner II and the HP ScanJet IIc (and the Mirror
800 Plus for the budget conscious).

Note that the ScanJet IIc has been superceded Nov. 1st by the IIcx, which
can be had for around $900 street price. CompUSA has them for $999, with a
30-day MBG.

Here's the PR for the ScanJet IIcx:
----
Newsgroups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware
From: r...@gr.hp.com (Bob Gann)
Subject: New HP ScanJet IIcx Scanner.
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1993 23:14:23 GMT
Nntp-Posting-Host: hpgrla.gr.hp.com
Organization: Hewlett-Packard Co., Greeley, CO, USA
X-Newsreader: TIN [version 1.2 PL0.11]

Announcing......

        The Hewlett Packard ScanJet IIcx Color Desktop Scanner.

Great news for those interested in color desktop scanners, Hewlett
Packard, Greeley HardCopy Division announces a new desktop color
scanner, the IIcx.

The ScanJet IIcx is an enhancement to the award winning HP ScanJet IIc,
the best color desktop scanner out there (in my humble opinion).

The ScanJet IIcx advances on the performance of the HP ScanJet IIc in
several areas, including:

        - Improved performance for OCR including up to 2x scan speed
          improvement for OCR scanning using HP Accupage 2.0 (Also
          a new release).

        - Improved image quality (via improvements in on board
          image processing chips).

        - Improved versatility with an available Transparency Adapter
          option for scanning transparent originals up to 8.5x11.7".
          (available January 1, 1994)

        - Improved ease of installation for PC users with a new,
          higher performance, switchless, CAM based SCSI Host adapter
          for EISA/ISA and MCA PC's.

        - Support of industry standard ASPI/CAM based SCSI Host
          adapters.

        - Improved scaling and interpolation range with interpolated
          scan resolution up to 1600ppi.

        - Improved usability with DeskScan II, version 2.0.

        - Bundled with Photostyler SE (PC) or Photoshop LE (Mac).

**********************************************************************
        All for the incredible low price of

                        $1179

        (suggested list, street price will vary, Transparency adapter
        optional), this is a big price decrease from the IIc.

**********************************************************************

And....

The HP ScanJet IIcx has all the qualities the award winning HP ScanJet IIc
has been known for:

        - HP's patented tri-chromatic beam splitter, giving the

                ONLY _SINGLE PASS, SINGLE EXPOSURE_

          color desktop scanner in this prices range
          (or any I know of.. more below).

        - HP's patented ability to scan at any y resolution,
          for optimal scaling and image quality.

        - Sophisticated on board image processing, including
          3x3 matrix multiplier, scaling and interpolation
          tone map control, image transform, analog compensation.

        - 400 ppi optical sampling rate.

        - Adaptive and fast scan speed.  

        - DeskScan II with live preview, closed loop calibration,
          and all the tools you need to capture the right image,
          the first time.  (a real productivity tool).

        - Rugged 50 page ADF (optional).

        - Legal size scan area

        - Rugged and reliable product with one year warranty and
          HP Express Exchange for 24hour replacement of a defective
          unit (U.S. only).

        - And more...

The IIcx should be available at dealers November 1, 1993.

----------------------------------------------------------------
And now, for you techy types....

I've made a lot of claims above, here is some more detail as to
what all the above is, and means.

----
OCR and performance improvements.

   - The IIcx has new scan modes for 1 bit and 4 bit greyscale
        scanning (used in OCR), which allows the IIcx to scan
        in twice as fast as the IIc for OCR use. (7.5 sec
        for 300dpi, 8.5x11").  Of course, this speed assumes
        that the host can accept the data that fast.  Higher
        end systems should be able to do this. Note also,
        this does _not_ include OCR processing time.

   - Speed enhancements for batch OCR processing with the ADF,
        including ability to change pages in the background,
        and minimized lamp warmup and scanner calibration time.

   - Accupage 2.0, which enables OCR packages using the IIcx
        to recognize very small text (4 point), optimize the
        image for OCR quality (removing background colors and
        optimizing exposure), preserve text structure (tables,
        columns and such) and provides packages capable of handling
        graphics with quality images versus the typical _ugly_
        images captured in OCR scanning.

   NOTE:  some of the above improvements depend on OCR package vendor's
        support of the IIcx and Accupage 2.0.  Most major OCR
        vendors are or will soon support Accupage 2.0.

---
Improved image quality

The HP ScanJet IIcx, like the IIc, has sophisticated image processing
capability in hardware.  In the IIcx HP has enhanced the capability
of the onboard, HP designed, image processing chips for improved image
quality.  The changes are subtle, but demonstrated HP's commitment to
optimal image quality at high speed.  _Some_ of the things that go on
inside the IIc that have been enhanced in the IIcx are:

   - 3x3 matrixing.  Those familiar with color science will
        immediately understand what 3x3 matrixing of color signals
        is all about.  This capability allows the input
        Red, Green and Blue, signals to be mixed to create new
        RGB output signals.  It can be very useful in color correction,
        calibration of systems, and color manipulation.  Now, 3x3 matrixing
        is a very compute intensive process requiring 9 multiplies per
        pixel, so hardware acceleration is required to make this
        timely.  It also requires that all three colors for
        each pixel be available at the same time, (which is not
        possible in most scanners.) The matrix used by the IIcx
        is automatically downloaded by DeskScan II
        to optimize images for your system.

   - On board tone map and brightness control.  This allows the scanning
        software to download tone maps to optimize the image before
        capture.  Combined with live preview in DeskScan II this
        allows you to capture the optimal image in the scanner, rather
        than capture a 'default' image and try to 'fix it up' in
        the image editor.  Capturing the optimal image up front is
        not only faster, it results in a better image.  

        [Unfortunately, most scanners (other than HP) are so difficult
        to use they make capturing the optimal exposure up front
        very difficult, so people make the mistake of making default
        exposures and fixing them in an editor.]

   - Sophisticated scaling and filtering.  The IIcx image processing
        engine handles hardware scaling and interpolation.  Combined
        with HP's patented variable y scan rate (made possible by HP's
        patented color separation technology), image scaling is handled
        rapidly and with minimal scaling artifacts.  In addition, the
        image processor applies appropriate filtering, based upon
        scan resolution, image type, scaling, etc., to give you the
        best image possible for your application.

   - Analog gain compensation and CCD correction.  Recently some scanner
        manufactures have 'touted' analog calibration of the CCD.  The
        ScanJet IIcx (and IIc) have always had analog compensation for
        CCD Photoresponse Nonuniformity (PRNU).  This is accomplished
        using the custom image processing and data conversion chips in
        the IIcx, again, an HP plus for image quality and speed.

    The list goes on....but enough for now.

----
Improved versatility.

  Available January 1, 1994, the the HP ScanJet IIcx/T Transparency
  adapter option.  This will allow users to scan transparent originals
  as well as reflective art.  The maximum scan area for Transparency
  scans is 8.5x11.7 inches.  The /T is fully supported by DeskScan II
  version 2.0, and all IIcx's.  

----
Improved ease of installation (PC).

  The IIcx is supplied with a new, CAM based, switchless SCSI host adapter
  to replace the IIc proprietary SCSI host adapter.  The switchless
  design means that the new card is much easier to install, simplifying
  the IIcx installation procedure.  In addition, the new card is I/O
  mapped instead of memory mapped, eliminating potential problems with
  memory conflicts.  The new IIcx card is also higher performance
  and support CAM SCSI drivers.

  For those who have an existing ASPI or CAM SCSI host adapter, the IIc
  is now supported on those standard SCSI cards with drivers supplied
  by HP.

-----
Improved scaling and interpolation range with interpolated scan
resolution up to 1600ppi.

  The HP ScanJet IIcx has an optical sampling rate of 400 ppi
  Through hardware and software interpolating, the IIcx will support
  interpolated sampling rates of 1600 ppi allowing enhanced scaling
  of images.

  NOTE:  the HP ScanJet IIcx uses a patented variable y scanning rate
  to provide optimal scaling in the y direction, and improved
  scanning speed.  This capability is dependent on HP's patented
  color separation technology.  

  What is means to you:  faster scans and better scaling of images.

-----
HP's Patented Color separation Technology.

Throughout the above I have referred to HP's patented color separation
technology and how it makes things possible that other color scanners
cannot do.  HP's color separation technique was introduced in the HP
ScanJet IIc and is unlike any other color scanner out there.

At this time it seems appropriate to have a little tutorial on common  
color separation technologys as used in color scanners today (desktop),
including HP's method, and why (I believe) HP's is superior.

 Disclaimer:  for details of how any particular scanner achieves color
 separation, contact the manufacturer of that scanner.  While I beleive
 I have accurately described each technique and included
 all the common techniques (that is my job after all), the
...

read more »

 
 
 

Color Flatbed Scanner info request

Post by Amitabh Shambhu R » Thu, 18 Nov 1993 11:13:45


Could anyone tell me if scanners (and I'm assuming that handheld scanners are
running on the same basic idea?) will be enhanced by a math coprocessor? I'm
thinking about buying a Thinkpad 350 which doesn't have an FP and I'm wonder-
ing if this is going to limit my scanning ability. Thanks in advance.


Thanks,

Amit

 
 
 

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