Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by seb » Wed, 26 Apr 2000 04:00:00



Bought a used IIe that came with several cards, but there's one that's
unidentified...
It's a long card (not that long) with nothing written on it except a grey
sticker that reads "DEC QC-OK". Then there are 16 little chips from various
makes, and one bigger from Nec that says "PIY386-147 D780C"
There are also a small set of 4 jumpers and a red led...

I have no idea of what that might be !

Any suggestions ?

Seb.

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Leslie Aylin » Wed, 26 Apr 2000 04:00:00



Quote:> Bought a used IIe that came with several cards, but there's one that's
> unidentified...
> It's a long card (not that long) with nothing written on it except a grey
> sticker that reads "DEC QC-OK". Then there are 16 little chips from
various
> makes, and one bigger from Nec that says "PIY386-147 D780C"
> There are also a small set of 4 jumpers and a red led...

> I have no idea of what that might be !

> Any suggestions ?

> Seb.

From memory, D780C is NEC's version of the Z-80 processor.
The 4 jumpers and the LED would perhaps suggest that it is a
Microsoft Softcard Clone.

Leslie

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Quadraje » Wed, 26 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Quote:>From memory, D780C is NEC's version of the Z-80 processor.
>The 4 jumpers and the LED would perhaps suggest that it is a
>Microsoft Softcard Clone.

>Leslie

   It's been a hunnert years, but that's what I was thinking too.

Raymond

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by seb » Wed, 26 Apr 2000 04:00:00






>> Bought a used IIe that came with several cards, but there's one that's
>> unidentified...
>> It's a long card (not that long) with nothing written on it except a grey
>> sticker that reads "DEC QC-OK". Then there are 16 little chips from
> various
>> makes, and one bigger from Nec that says "PIY386-147 D780C"
>> There are also a small set of 4 jumpers and a red led...

>> I have no idea of what that might be !

>> Any suggestions ?

>> Seb.

> From memory, D780C is NEC's version of the Z-80 processor.
> The 4 jumpers and the LED would perhaps suggest that it is a
> Microsoft Softcard Clone.

> Leslie

Yeah, that's what many other people seem to think...
Was that the early beginings of PC-compatibility on Apple computers ?
 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Bigg » Thu, 27 Apr 2000 04:00:00





> > From memory, D780C is NEC's version of the Z-80 processor.
> > The 4 jumpers and the LED would perhaps suggest that it is a
> > Microsoft Softcard Clone.
> Yeah, that's what many other people seem to think...
> Was that the early beginings of PC-compatibility on Apple computers ?

Erm, no. If it has a Z80, it's probably for CP/M.

--

(Remove the hyphen! Spambusters at work!)

*** Half the people you know are below average. ***

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Leslie Aylin » Thu, 27 Apr 2000 04:00:00







> >> Bought a used IIe that came with several cards, but there's one that's
> >> unidentified...
> >> It's a long card (not that long) with nothing written on it except a
grey
> >> sticker that reads "DEC QC-OK". Then there are 16 little chips from
> > various
> >> makes, and one bigger from Nec that says "PIY386-147 D780C"
> >> There are also a small set of 4 jumpers and a red led...

> >> I have no idea of what that might be !

> >> Any suggestions ?

> >> Seb.

> > From memory, D780C is NEC's version of the Z-80 processor.
> > The 4 jumpers and the LED would perhaps suggest that it is a
> > Microsoft Softcard Clone.

> > Leslie

> Yeah, that's what many other people seem to think...
> Was that the early beginings of PC-compatibility on Apple computers ?

No!

The Z-80 card gave CP/M compatability to the Apple ][.
Several other improved Z-80 cards followed the Microsoft Softcard,
inlcuding(but not limited to) The "Star card", and the "Appli-Card"
both had either/or faster clock speeds/more memory to allow
CP/M V3.0 to run.

There was an 8088 card produced that allowed the Apple//e to run
run MSDOS 3.3, one turned up on EBAY last week in fact. Who
manufactured it, I don't recall.

There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

Leslie

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by seb » Thu, 27 Apr 2000 04:00:00










>>>> Bought a used IIe that came with several cards, but there's one that's
>>>> unidentified...
>>>> It's a long card (not that long) with nothing written on it except a
> grey
>>>> sticker that reads "DEC QC-OK". Then there are 16 little chips from
>>> various
>>>> makes, and one bigger from Nec that says "PIY386-147 D780C"
>>>> There are also a small set of 4 jumpers and a red led...

>>>> I have no idea of what that might be !

>>>> Any suggestions ?

>>>> Seb.

>>> From memory, D780C is NEC's version of the Z-80 processor.
>>> The 4 jumpers and the LED would perhaps suggest that it is a
>>> Microsoft Softcard Clone.

>>> Leslie

>> Yeah, that's what many other people seem to think...
>> Was that the early beginings of PC-compatibility on Apple computers ?

> No!

> The Z-80 card gave CP/M compatability to the Apple ][.
> Several other improved Z-80 cards followed the Microsoft Softcard,
> inlcuding(but not limited to) The "Star card", and the "Appli-Card"
> both had either/or faster clock speeds/more memory to allow
> CP/M V3.0 to run.

> There was an 8088 card produced that allowed the Apple//e to run
> run MSDOS 3.3, one turned up on EBAY last week in fact. Who
> manufactured it, I don't recall.

> There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
> you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

> Leslie

I must have been expensive at the time it was released, right ? I'm pretty
amazed that such compatibility already existed by then...
 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Scott Alft » Thu, 27 Apr 2000 04:00:00




>There was an 8088 card produced that allowed the Apple//e to run
>run MSDOS 3.3, one turned up on EBAY last week in fact. Who
>manufactured it, I don't recall.

You're thinking of the PC Transporter, from Applied Engineering.  It
actually used a V20, not an 8088 (or was it a V30 instead of an 8086?).
(The difference was that the V[23]0 was a little bit faster than the 808[86]
at a given clock speed.)

Quote:>There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
>you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).  There
were also add-ons for several memory-expansion cards that allowed you to
replace the 65(C)02 in a IIe with a 65C816 (had one from Applied Engineering
for their RamWorks III...played with it for a little while, but I liked my
10-MHz RocketChip better :-) ).

  _/_
 / v \
(IIGS(  Scott Alfter (salfter at (yo no quiero spam) delphi dot com)
 \_^_/  http://salfter.dyndns.org

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Roy and/or Janet Mille » Fri, 28 Apr 2000 04:00:00



> > >There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
> > >you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

> > I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
> > running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).

> Yes.  CP/M-86 requires an 8088 or 8086, so a 68000 card would have
> nothing to do with it.

> The 68K version of OS/9 seems a more likely prospect.  MacOS would be
> highly improbable.

> Was there ever actually a 68K card which made it to the market?  I
> remember hearing about one being designed, but I don't remember it being
> released.

> --
> David Empson

There was a CP/M 68K. I understand that it is the basis for the
operating system of the Atari ST. Which makes some sense, since Atari
used the GEM GUI and both came from Digital Research.

I remember seeing adds for 68000 (and 6800) cards for the Apple ][,
usually to do some scientific or engineering work. What that would
involve is beyond me though.

Roy

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by David Emps » Sat, 29 Apr 2000 04:00:00





> >There was an 8088 card produced that allowed the Apple//e to run
> >run MSDOS 3.3, one turned up on EBAY last week in fact. Who
> >manufactured it, I don't recall.

> You're thinking of the PC Transporter, from Applied Engineering.  It
> actually used a V20, not an 8088 (or was it a V30 instead of an 8086?).

V30.  It has a 16-bit data bus.  The processor runs at about 7.2 MHz,
which works out about 3 times the speed of a PC/XT (4.77 MHz 8088).
Disk I/O sluggishness throws the calculation back in favour of the real
PC, however.

Quote:> (The difference was that the V[23]0 was a little bit faster than the 808[86]
> at a given clock speed.)

Another difference is that the V20/V30 have several extra instructions
(a close match to the extra instructions in the 80188/6, if not
identical).  Some MS-DOS software which nominally requires an 80286 but
runs in real mode will also work on a V20/V30/80188/80186.

Quote:> >There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
> >you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

> I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
> running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).

Yes.  CP/M-86 requires an 8088 or 8086, so a 68000 card would have
nothing to do with it.

The 68K version of OS/9 seems a more likely prospect.  MacOS would be
highly improbable.

Was there ever actually a 68K card which made it to the market?  I
remember hearing about one being designed, but I don't remember it being
released.

--
David Empson

Snail mail: P O Box 27-103, Wellington, New Zealand

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Leslie Aylin » Sun, 30 Apr 2000 04:00:00




> > >There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
> > >you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

> > I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
> > running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).

> Yes.  CP/M-86 requires an 8088 or 8086, so a 68000 card would have
> nothing to do with it.

> The 68K version of OS/9 seems a more likely prospect.  MacOS would be
> highly improbable.

> Was there ever actually a 68K card which made it to the market?  I
> remember hearing about one being designed, but I don't remember it being
> released.

> --
> David Empson

> Snail mail: P O Box 27-103, Wellington, New Zealand

DOH!
Sorry slip of the fingers. That should have read CPM-68K

The 68000 card I have has 128k on the board and originally sold
for $1850 (AUS) when it was released!
Mine was in a unit that was given to me so I don't know where the
card was originally purchased.

There is also some software included in the package to speed up
Applesoft Basic string handling functions.

OS/9 was available on the Apple][ with the addition of a card called
"The Mill" by Stellation Two. It didn't have any RAM onboard but
as far as I can recall it re-mapped the Apple ][ memory in a similar way
to the Microsoft Softcard. It also had Applesoft speed-up software
patches that came with it.

Leslie

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Scott Alft » Sun, 30 Apr 2000 04:00:00







>> >There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
>> >you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

>> I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
>> running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).

>The 68K version of OS/9 seems a more likely prospect.  MacOS would be
>highly improbable.

You're more than likely right.  I was thinking of an ad in the November 1985
issue of _Nibble_ for a product called the "Graphics Tool Kit" (ad is on
page 96).  I remembered the heading, "Put a Mac in your Apple II," but the
product appears to be a higher-resolution (640x384) graphics card and not a
68K card.

  _/_
 / v \
(IIGS(  Scott Alfter (salfter at (yo no quiero spam) delphi dot com)
 \_^_/  http://salfter.dyndns.org

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Quadraje » Sun, 30 Apr 2000 04:00:00


Quote:>> You're thinking of the PC Transporter, from Applied Engineering.  It
>> actually used a V20, not an 8088 (or was it a V30 instead of an 8086?).

>V30.  It has a 16-bit data bus.  The processor runs at about 7.2 MHz,
>which works out about 3 times the speed of a PC/XT (4.77 MHz 8088).
>Disk I/O sluggishness throws the calculation back in favour of the real
>PC, however.

>> (The difference was that the V[23]0 was a little bit faster than the 808[86]
>> at a given clock speed.)

  I have a PC Transporter on ebay right now.  Probably the one you're talking
about.  It's a V30 chip, but mine has the optional 8087 math co-processor for
even better speeds.

Quote:>Another difference is that the V20/V30 have several extra instructions
>(a close match to the extra instructions in the 80188/6, if not
>identical).  Some MS-DOS software which nominally requires an 80286 but
>runs in real mode will also work on a V20/V30/80188/80186.

>> >There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
>> >you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

>> I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
>> running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).

>Yes.  CP/M-86 requires an 8088 or 8086, so a 68000 card would have
>nothing to do with it.

>The 68K version of OS/9 seems a more likely prospect.  MacOS would be
>highly improbable.

>Was there ever actually a 68K card which made it to the market?  I
>remember hearing about one being designed, but I don't remember it being
>released.

   I have in my hands right now an Enhancement Technology PDQ II 68000 board
for the II.  256K of RAM. The McMill mentioned is not a true 68000, but a 68008
chip.  The McMill ran at 1 Mhz, the ET board ran at 10 Mhz.  The McMill was
$195, the McMill Plus was $295, the Et PDQ II was $695.

  According to a December 1985 A+ article, the 3 boards mentioned above are the
only 68K boards available at the time.

Raymond

 
 
 

Unidentified IIe Card !!!

Post by Roger Johnston » Sun, 30 Apr 2000 04:00:00


----------





>> >There was also a 68000 card (I know, because I have one) that allowed
>> >you to run CP/M-86 aswell.

>> I think I saw an ad for one of these long ago, but it was aimed more at
>> running MacOS than CP/M-86 (wasn't that an x86-based OS anyway?).

>Yes.  CP/M-86 requires an 8088 or 8086, so a 68000 card would have
>nothing to do with it.

>The 68K version of OS/9 seems a more likely prospect.  MacOS would be
>highly improbable.

>Was there ever actually a 68K card which made it to the market?  I
>remember hearing about one being designed, but I don't remember it being
>released.

Stellation Two advertised a 68008 card with an assembler and Forth to match
(inCider magazine, December 1986). They also sold 6809 cards. Cirtech had a
Macintosh emulator card for the Apple II (GS only I think) but never
released it.

Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~rojaws
------------------------------------------
Customer: I'm running Windows '98
Tech: Yes.
Customer: My computer isn't working now.
Tech: Yes, you said that.

 
 
 

1. Need help with unidentified card.

I bought an Apple 2e today with 4 cards installed. I know what
the first 3 are. But I can't find any information on the last.

It has X-RONN 4.1D wrote on it, a 20 pin connector, 2 size N
batteries and 1 jumper.

A few of the chips and what information I could find on them are

8629mbx - ???
mc6850p - Asynchronous communication interface adapter
mc6821p - Parallel interface adapter
tp5089n - DTMF
mt8870be - DTMF decoder
There are about 6 - 8 other small chips.

It sounds like maybe a modem card. But I hope someone
can give me some more information on it.

Thanks,
Dave Warren

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