Domain problem

Domain problem

Post by Scott Hup » Thu, 21 Sep 2000 04:00:00



I have two Windows 2000 computers that can't join our domain. The error is: "The
specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted." All other
Windows OS's work in our domain, Win95, Win98, NT40. Why would the 2000's be
unable to join?

 
 
 

Domain problem

Post by Jason » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Three letters:  DNS.   See below for a more complete background and tshoot
guide for this.

jason
Joining Domains:

Windows 2000 uses DNS as its primary domain resource locator for many
domain-level activities.  With domain join activities, Windows 2000 uses DNS
SRV records to locate the domain controllers for the domains.  Having a
compliant DNS architecture (from any BIND 8.2.x DNS vendor) is a critical
component for implementing Windows 2000 on your network.   In small
environments, it is possible to workaround the DNS SRV requirements with a
single \0x1b LMHOSTS entry, but this does not scale well in large
environments.

At any rate, when troubleshooting network related issues, your first checks
should be with the following two tools.  Netsetup.log and NetDiag.  They are
critical to any person working on Windows 2000 network issues.   Anything
else outside of basic PING/Tracert is really wasting your time.

1.      Check %windir%\debug\netsetup.log  (more detailed info on the domain
join issues)
-  To get a brief explanation of some of the error codes listed in this log
file, use the command   net helpmsg  <error number>
C:\>net helpmsg 1355  (generally DNS or IP related)
"The specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted. "

C:\> net helpmsg 5   (generally means the credentials of the user do nto
have enough privs to create/reset a machine account in the domain)
"Access is Denied"

2.      If the base check does not give you enough details, look for the
specific functions in the log.  In most cases the first failed function is
the problem.

  a.. The NetpDsGetDCName function is used for several actions, the first of
which is to locate domain controllers.  If it fails, there is probably a
problem resolving the DNS name.  Nltest.exe can be used to test DNS name
resolution (NLTEST /DSGETDC:DOMAIN).   NetDiag.exe (more below) will also
test DNS name resolution from the client.
  b.. The NetpDSGetDCName function is also used to locate the client's
computer account in the domain.  If the function cannot locate a domain
controller with the computer account on the domain controller, the client
may not have created the account on the domain controller correctly. To
resolve this problem verify that a computer account exists on the domain
controller.  NetDiag can also help out with this.
  c.. The NetPJoinDomain function is used for creating the machine account
(or resetting the account pswd) and if it records an error 5 "Access Denied"
, it generally means the user attempting to join the domain does not have
sufficient credentials to update the machine object.  To resolve the problem
use domain admin, or equivalent, credentials when joining PC's to the
domain.
3.       Run the command-line tool NETDIAG.EXE as  netdiag /L

This creates netdiag.log and is critical for troubleshooting ANY Win2000
network-related problems it can help diagnose issues w/ connectivity, name
resolution, DC outages, even route table issuesif you add a /V switch

        It is in the \support\tools dir of the Win2000 CD, just run the
setup.exe.

        The error messages are generally in plain text and are easy to
follow, but the tool does not work on NT4 machines
Joining an NT4 client to a Win2000 domain
You may encounter the client error:  "Domain Controller cannot be found".

Solutions for Static IP clients:

1.        Create a computer account using the "Active Directory Users and
Computers" snap in for the down-level client on your Windows 2000 Server.

2.       Manually enter add a host record for the static IP address clients
in DDNS client in the forward zone in which the client resides. Static
down-level clients cannot register their own host address in DDNS by
default.

3.       Configure the client to either use a lmhosts file per:
Q150800 - Domain Browsing with TCP/IP and LMHOSTS Files
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q150/8/00.asp

        When using this option make sure the 1b entry shows up in the NBT
Remote Cache Name Table.
Run the two commands at a command prompt:     nbtstat -R   and     nbstat -c

        If the <1b> entry does not show up in the name table follow
Q150800 until the lmhosts file caches properly.

OR

        Enable the client to point to the WINS server and specify the IP
Address of the WINS server.

4.       On the NT 4.0 Client or your Downlevel on Network Properties change
the Domain to equal the Downlevel Domain used on your Windows 2000 domain.

        This would be the same as the Netbios Domain Name.

        An example would be "My2000Domain" not the Fully Qualified Domain
Name  (FQDN) such as mydomain.com.

        Reboot your downlevel client after configuring its networking
properties.

Solutions for DHCP Clients:
1.    Create a computer account under the "Active Directory Users and
Computers" snap in for the

NT4 client on your Windows 2000 Server.

2.   Add a WINS server to the network.  Clients that can't read  DDNS "SRV"
records will need WINS in order to find domain services such as domain
Browse List.

3.       Add DHCP Service on the Windows 2000 box, create a scope, on the
DNS tab of the scope properties check the following "enable updates for DNS
clients that do not support dynamic updates". After this is checked the DHCP
server will register the host records for the downlevel client.

        Configure the DHCP server under Scope Options for option 44 and
specify the IP Address of the WINS Server. Configure option 46 and specify
the node type. In the most Local Area Networks you can specify 0x8, which is
hybrid mode.   Hybrid mode queries peer to peer and then broadcasts for name
resolution.

4.   Add a DNS Server, on the forward zone such as yourdomain.com, Open up
the properties and reply to "allow dynamic updates?"   Change the answer to
Yes.   This will allow the downlevel clients to add their hosts records to
the DDNS server by allowing DHCP to register for them on their behalf.

5.   On the NT 4.0 box, open Network Neighborhood properties and change the
DomainName to equal the Downlevel DomainName used on your Windows 2000
domain.     This would be the same as the Netbios Domain Name.

        An example would be "MyDomain" not the Fully Qualified Domain Name
(FQDN) such as mydomain.com.

        Reboot your downlevel client after configuring its networking
properties.

 Additional Knowledge Base Resources

Q247811 How Domain Controllers Are Located in Windows 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q247/8/11.asp

Q256083 Err Msg: The Specified Domain Either Does Not Exist or Could...
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q256/0/83.asp

Q258832 Cannot Join Windows 2000 Client to a Windows NT Domain
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q258/8/32.asp

Q232025 Description of the DNS SRV Resource Record Type
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q232/0/25.asp

Q178169 DNS Records Registered by Windows 2000 Domain Controllers
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q178/1/69.asp

Q241515 Verifying the Creation of SRV Records for a Domain Controller
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q241/5/15.asp

Q237675 Setting Up the Domain Name System for Active Directory
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q237/6/75.asp

Q150800 - Domain Browsing with TCP/IP and LMHOSTS Files
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q150/8/00.asp


I have two Windows 2000 computers that can't join our domain. The error is:
"The
specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted." All other
Windows OS's work in our domain, Win95, Win98, NT40. Why would the 2000's be
unable to join?

 
 
 

Domain problem

Post by Jeff » Fri, 22 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Hi Jason,
              I am also having a problem trying to get a win2k professional
client with SP1 to
join a win2k advanced server with SP1 domain.  I have active directory
installed and I am currently using dns from our service provider, but active
directory did install the local dns server to the box but I haven't touched
it.  I can log 95 and 98 boxes into the domain, no problem, but when I try
to log the win2k pro box in I get a "network path not found" error.  I am
stuck on this, can someone help....
I read your reply below, could you give me a step by step of adding the
LMHOST settings to my server.  I have only 15 computers and I don't host a
actual live domain name on our box.  Could you give me the best scenario for
smaller networks?  Attached is a copy of netsetup.log file...

09/20 11:32:23 NetpDoDomainJoin
09/20 11:32:23 NetpMachineValidToJoin: 'FRED'
09/20 11:32:23 NetpGetLsaPrimaryDomain: status: 0x0
09/20 11:32:23 NetpMachineValidToJoin: status: 0x0
09/20 11:32:23 NetpJoinDomain
09/20 11:32:23  Machine: FRED
09/20 11:32:23  Domain: savvy
09/20 11:32:23  MachineAccountOU: (NULL)
09/20 11:32:23  Account: savvy\fsdk
09/20 11:32:23  Options: 0x27
09/20 11:32:23  OS Version: 5.0
09/20 11:32:23  Build number: 2195
09/20 11:32:23 NetpValidateName: checking to see if 'savvy' is valid as type
3 name
09/20 11:32:23 NetpCheckDomainNameIsValid [ Exists ] for 'savvy' returned
0x0
09/20 11:32:23 NetpValidateName: name 'savvy' is valid for type 3
09/20 11:32:23 NetpDsGetDcName: trying to find DC in domain 'savvy', flags:
0x1020
09/20 11:32:23 NetpDsGetDcName: found DC '\\vs-membserver.savvy' in the
specified domain
09/20 11:32:23 NetUseAdd to \\vs-membserver.savvy\IPC$ returned 1231
09/20 11:32:23 NetpJoinDomain: status of connecting to dc
'\\vs-membserver.savvy': 0x4cf
09/20 11:32:23 NetpDoDomainJoin: status: 0x4cf

Thanks
Jeff

Jason P <jp...@-NOSPAM-home.com> wrote in message

news:#yHV7a$IAHA.88@cppssbbsa02.microsoft.com...
> Three letters:  DNS.   See below for a more complete background and tshoot
> guide for this.

> jason
> Joining Domains:

> Windows 2000 uses DNS as its primary domain resource locator for many
> domain-level activities.  With domain join activities, Windows 2000 uses
DNS
> SRV records to locate the domain controllers for the domains.  Having a
> compliant DNS architecture (from any BIND 8.2.x DNS vendor) is a critical
> component for implementing Windows 2000 on your network.   In small
> environments, it is possible to workaround the DNS SRV requirements with a
> single \0x1b LMHOSTS entry, but this does not scale well in large
> environments.

> At any rate, when troubleshooting network related issues, your first
checks
> should be with the following two tools.  Netsetup.log and NetDiag.  They
are
> critical to any person working on Windows 2000 network issues.   Anything
> else outside of basic PING/Tracert is really wasting your time.

> 1.      Check %windir%\debug\netsetup.log  (more detailed info on the
domain
> join issues)
> -  To get a brief explanation of some of the error codes listed in this
log
> file, use the command   net helpmsg  <error number>
> C:\>net helpmsg 1355  (generally DNS or IP related)
> "The specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted. "

> C:\> net helpmsg 5   (generally means the credentials of the user do nto
> have enough privs to create/reset a machine account in the domain)
> "Access is Denied"

> 2.      If the base check does not give you enough details, look for the
> specific functions in the log.  In most cases the first failed function is
> the problem.

>   a.. The NetpDsGetDCName function is used for several actions, the first
of
> which is to locate domain controllers.  If it fails, there is probably a
> problem resolving the DNS name.  Nltest.exe can be used to test DNS name
> resolution (NLTEST /DSGETDC:DOMAIN).   NetDiag.exe (more below) will also
> test DNS name resolution from the client.
>   b.. The NetpDSGetDCName function is also used to locate the client's
> computer account in the domain.  If the function cannot locate a domain
> controller with the computer account on the domain controller, the client
> may not have created the account on the domain controller correctly. To
> resolve this problem verify that a computer account exists on the domain
> controller.  NetDiag can also help out with this.
>   c.. The NetPJoinDomain function is used for creating the machine account
> (or resetting the account pswd) and if it records an error 5 "Access
Denied"
> , it generally means the user attempting to join the domain does not have
> sufficient credentials to update the machine object.  To resolve the
problem
> use domain admin, or equivalent, credentials when joining PC's to the
> domain.
> 3.       Run the command-line tool NETDIAG.EXE as  netdiag /L

> This creates netdiag.log and is critical for troubleshooting ANY Win2000
> network-related problems it can help diagnose issues w/ connectivity, name
> resolution, DC outages, even route table issuesif you add a /V switch

>         It is in the \support\tools dir of the Win2000 CD, just run the
> setup.exe.

>         The error messages are generally in plain text and are easy to
> follow, but the tool does not work on NT4 machines
> Joining an NT4 client to a Win2000 domain
> You may encounter the client error:  "Domain Controller cannot be found".

> Solutions for Static IP clients:

> 1.        Create a computer account using the "Active Directory Users and
> Computers" snap in for the down-level client on your Windows 2000 Server.

> 2.       Manually enter add a host record for the static IP address
clients
> in DDNS client in the forward zone in which the client resides. Static
> down-level clients cannot register their own host address in DDNS by
> default.

> 3.       Configure the client to either use a lmhosts file per:
> Q150800 - Domain Browsing with TCP/IP and LMHOSTS Files
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q150/8/00.asp

>         When using this option make sure the 1b entry shows up in the
NBT
> Remote Cache Name Table.
> Run the two commands at a command prompt:     nbtstat -R   and
    nbstat -c

>         If the <1b> entry does not show up in the name table follow
> Q150800 until the lmhosts file caches properly.

> OR

>         Enable the client to point to the WINS server and specify the IP
> Address of the WINS server.

> 4.       On the NT 4.0 Client or your Downlevel on Network Properties
change
> the Domain to equal the Downlevel Domain used on your Windows 2000 domain.

>         This would be the same as the Netbios Domain Name.

>         An example would be "My2000Domain" not the Fully Qualified
Domain
> Name  (FQDN) such as mydomain.com.

>         Reboot your downlevel client after configuring its networking
> properties.

> Solutions for DHCP Clients:
> 1.    Create a computer account under the "Active Directory Users and
> Computers" snap in for the

> NT4 client on your Windows 2000 Server.

> 2.   Add a WINS server to the network.  Clients that can't read  DDNS
"SRV"
> records will need WINS in order to find domain services such as domain
> Browse List.

> 3.       Add DHCP Service on the Windows 2000 box, create a scope, on the
> DNS tab of the scope properties check the following "enable updates for
DNS
> clients that do not support dynamic updates". After this is checked the
DHCP
> server will register the host records for the downlevel client.

>         Configure the DHCP server under Scope Options for option 44 and
> specify the IP Address of the WINS Server. Configure option 46 and specify
> the node type. In the most Local Area Networks you can specify 0x8, which
is
> hybrid mode.   Hybrid mode queries peer to peer and then broadcasts for
name
> resolution.

> 4.   Add a DNS Server, on the forward zone such as yourdomain.com, Open up
> the properties and reply to "allow dynamic updates?"   Change the answer
to
> Yes.   This will allow the downlevel clients to add their hosts records to
> the DDNS server by allowing DHCP to register for them on their behalf.

> 5.   On the NT 4.0 box, open Network Neighborhood properties and change
the
> DomainName to equal the Downlevel DomainName used on your Windows 2000
> domain.     This would be the same as the Netbios Domain Name.

>         An example would be "MyDomain" not the Fully Qualified Domain
Name
> (FQDN) such as mydomain.com.

>         Reboot your downlevel client after configuring its networking
> properties.

>  Additional Knowledge Base Resources

> Q247811 How Domain Controllers Are Located in Windows 2000
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q247/8/11.asp

> Q256083 Err Msg: The Specified Domain Either Does Not Exist or Could...
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q256/0/83.asp

> Q258832 Cannot Join Windows 2000 Client to a Windows NT Domain
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q258/8/32.asp

> Q232025 Description of the DNS SRV Resource Record Type
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q232/0/25.asp

> Q178169 DNS Records Registered by Windows 2000 Domain Controllers
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q178/1/69.asp

> Q241515 Verifying the Creation of SRV Records for a Domain Controller
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q241/5/15.asp

> Q237675 Setting Up the Domain Name System for Active Directory
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q237/6/75.asp

> Q150800 - Domain Browsing with TCP/IP and LMHOSTS Files
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q150/8/00.asp

> "Scott Hupp" <Scott.H...@co.orange.fl.us> wrote in message
> news:0f0e01c02306$23b87140$4b862ecf@cpmsftngxa10...

> I have two Windows 2000 computers that can't join our domain. The error
is:
> "The
> specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted." All
other

...

read more »

 
 
 

Domain problem

Post by Jason » Tue, 26 Sep 2000 04:00:00


Well I can see the issue is connectivity related --the error you are getting
is 1231 = The network location cannot be reached

The step by step for an LMHOSTS is contained in the Q150800 article -best
bet is to use the syntax provided for the Win95/98 clients (on yopur Win2000
client as it too wants to know where the PDC is and uses the \0x1b entry for
that)

LMHOSTS:
..... they need entries in the LMHOSTS file that indicate who the PDC is.
Assuming the example above is the PDC of the domain, you would have two
entries:
  199.199.199.1 controller1 #PRE #DOM:domainname
  199.199.199.1 "domainname,,,,,\0x1b" #PRE
The first entry allows the PDC to act as a logon domain controller for the
client, the second entry allows the client browser service to explicitly
find the PDC. Remember you will probably have multiple lines similar to the
first line (for multiple domain controllers), but only one line with the
\0x1b directive (to designate the PDC). Note that the domain name must be in
quotes, and padded with spaces for a total of 15 characters before the \0x1b
portion. (The example above shows commas for visual placeholders, however in
a real LMHOSTS file these commas would be replaced with spaces). Also be
aware that moving the PDC role to another Windows NT Server (via promotion)
will cause your \0x1b entry to be invalid. Options to fix this:

  a.. Switch IP addresses on the controllers, so effectively the PDC always
has the same address. You would not need to change anything in the LMHOSTS
file.

  b.. Change the \0x1b IP address in all the LMHOSTS files on the clients,
or on the centrally distributed LMHOSTS file (if you are implementing that).
HTH
jason

"Jeff" <j...@visualsavvy.com> wrote in message

news:ecP0wOBJAHA.259@cppssbbsa02.microsoft.com...
> Hi Jason,
>               I am also having a problem trying to get a win2k
professional
> client with SP1 to
> join a win2k advanced server with SP1 domain.  I have active directory
> installed and I am currently using dns from our service provider, but
active
> directory did install the local dns server to the box but I haven't
touched
> it.  I can log 95 and 98 boxes into the domain, no problem, but when I try
> to log the win2k pro box in I get a "network path not found" error.  I am
> stuck on this, can someone help....
> I read your reply below, could you give me a step by step of adding the
> LMHOST settings to my server.  I have only 15 computers and I don't host a
> actual live domain name on our box.  Could you give me the best scenario
for
> smaller networks?  Attached is a copy of netsetup.log file...

> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpDoDomainJoin
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpMachineValidToJoin: 'FRED'
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpGetLsaPrimaryDomain: status: 0x0
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpMachineValidToJoin: status: 0x0
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpJoinDomain
> 09/20 11:32:23  Machine: FRED
> 09/20 11:32:23  Domain: savvy
> 09/20 11:32:23  MachineAccountOU: (NULL)
> 09/20 11:32:23  Account: savvy\fsdk
> 09/20 11:32:23  Options: 0x27
> 09/20 11:32:23  OS Version: 5.0
> 09/20 11:32:23  Build number: 2195
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpValidateName: checking to see if 'savvy' is valid as
type
> 3 name
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpCheckDomainNameIsValid [ Exists ] for 'savvy' returned
> 0x0
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpValidateName: name 'savvy' is valid for type 3
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpDsGetDcName: trying to find DC in domain 'savvy',
flags:
> 0x1020
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpDsGetDcName: found DC '\\vs-membserver.savvy' in the
> specified domain
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetUseAdd to \\vs-membserver.savvy\IPC$ returned 1231
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpJoinDomain: status of connecting to dc
> '\\vs-membserver.savvy': 0x4cf
> 09/20 11:32:23 NetpDoDomainJoin: status: 0x4cf

> Thanks
> Jeff

> Jason P <jp...@-NOSPAM-home.com> wrote in message
> news:#yHV7a$IAHA.88@cppssbbsa02.microsoft.com...
> > Three letters:  DNS.   See below for a more complete background and
tshoot
> > guide for this.

> > jason
> > Joining Domains:

> > Windows 2000 uses DNS as its primary domain resource locator for many
> > domain-level activities.  With domain join activities, Windows 2000 uses
> DNS
> > SRV records to locate the domain controllers for the domains.  Having a
> > compliant DNS architecture (from any BIND 8.2.x DNS vendor) is a
critical
> > component for implementing Windows 2000 on your network.   In small
> > environments, it is possible to workaround the DNS SRV requirements with
a
> > single \0x1b LMHOSTS entry, but this does not scale well in large
> > environments.

> > At any rate, when troubleshooting network related issues, your first
> checks
> > should be with the following two tools.  Netsetup.log and NetDiag.  They
> are
> > critical to any person working on Windows 2000 network issues.
Anything
> > else outside of basic PING/Tracert is really wasting your time.

> > 1.      Check %windir%\debug\netsetup.log  (more detailed info on the
> domain
> > join issues)
> > -  To get a brief explanation of some of the error codes listed in this
> log
> > file, use the command   net helpmsg  <error number>
> > C:\>net helpmsg 1355  (generally DNS or IP related)
> > "The specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted. "

> > C:\> net helpmsg 5   (generally means the credentials of the user do nto
> > have enough privs to create/reset a machine account in the domain)
> > "Access is Denied"

> > 2.      If the base check does not give you enough details, look for the
> > specific functions in the log.  In most cases the first failed function
is
> > the problem.

> >   a.. The NetpDsGetDCName function is used for several actions, the
first
> of
> > which is to locate domain controllers.  If it fails, there is probably a
> > problem resolving the DNS name.  Nltest.exe can be used to test DNS name
> > resolution (NLTEST /DSGETDC:DOMAIN).   NetDiag.exe (more below) will
also
> > test DNS name resolution from the client.
> >   b.. The NetpDSGetDCName function is also used to locate the client's
> > computer account in the domain.  If the function cannot locate a domain
> > controller with the computer account on the domain controller, the
client
> > may not have created the account on the domain controller correctly. To
> > resolve this problem verify that a computer account exists on the domain
> > controller.  NetDiag can also help out with this.
> >   c.. The NetPJoinDomain function is used for creating the machine
account
> > (or resetting the account pswd) and if it records an error 5 "Access
> Denied"
> > , it generally means the user attempting to join the domain does not
have
> > sufficient credentials to update the machine object.  To resolve the
> problem
> > use domain admin, or equivalent, credentials when joining PC's to the
> > domain.
> > 3.       Run the command-line tool NETDIAG.EXE as  netdiag /L

> > This creates netdiag.log and is critical for troubleshooting ANY Win2000
> > network-related problems it can help diagnose issues w/ connectivity,
name
> > resolution, DC outages, even route table issuesif you add a /V switch

> >         It is in the \support\tools dir of the Win2000 CD, just run
the
> > setup.exe.

> >         The error messages are generally in plain text and are easy to
> > follow, but the tool does not work on NT4 machines
> > Joining an NT4 client to a Win2000 domain
> > You may encounter the client error:  "Domain Controller cannot be
found".

> > Solutions for Static IP clients:

> > 1.        Create a computer account using the "Active Directory Users
and
> > Computers" snap in for the down-level client on your Windows 2000
Server.

> > 2.       Manually enter add a host record for the static IP address
> clients
> > in DDNS client in the forward zone in which the client resides. Static
> > down-level clients cannot register their own host address in DDNS by
> > default.

> > 3.       Configure the client to either use a lmhosts file per:
> > Q150800 - Domain Browsing with TCP/IP and LMHOSTS Files
> > http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q150/8/00.asp

> >         When using this option make sure the 1b entry shows up in the
> NBT
> > Remote Cache Name Table.
> > Run the two commands at a command prompt:     nbtstat -R   and
>     nbstat -c

> >         If the <1b> entry does not show up in the name table follow
> > Q150800 until the lmhosts file caches properly.

> > OR

> >         Enable the client to point to the WINS server and specify the
IP
> > Address of the WINS server.

> > 4.       On the NT 4.0 Client or your Downlevel on Network Properties
> change
> > the Domain to equal the Downlevel Domain used on your Windows 2000
domain.

> >         This would be the same as the Netbios Domain Name.

> >         An example would be "My2000Domain" not the Fully Qualified
> Domain
> > Name  (FQDN) such as mydomain.com.

> >         Reboot your downlevel client after configuring its networking
> > properties.

> > Solutions for DHCP Clients:
> > 1.    Create a computer account under the "Active Directory Users and
> > Computers" snap in for the

> > NT4 client on your Windows 2000 Server.

> > 2.   Add a WINS server to the network.  Clients that can't read  DDNS
> "SRV"
> > records will need WINS in order to find domain services such as domain
> > Browse List.

> > 3.       Add DHCP Service on the Windows 2000 box, create a scope, on
the
> > DNS tab of the scope properties check the following "enable updates for
> DNS
> > clients that do not support dynamic updates". After this is checked the
> DHCP
> > server will register the host records for the downlevel client.

> >         Configure the DHCP server under Scope Options for option 44
and
> > specify the IP Address of the WINS Server. Configure option 46 and
specify
> > the node type. In the most Local Area Networks you can specify 0x8,
which
> is
> > hybrid mode.   Hybrid mode queries peer to peer and then

...

read more »

 
 
 

1. Domain SNAFU (orphaned domain problems)

Hi all,

Well, I really made a mess of this one.

I have the tipical story about a child domain that can't be removed
because the DC was reformatted without demoting the DC.  I have
followed all of the advice on various newsgroups and Q articles, but I
have run into a snag.

This has all become a problem because one of my ADs died on me, and as
it happens it was the only GC in the domain.  I am trying to promote
the other AD server to a GC, but it refuses to do so, because, and I
quote:

"A request has been made to promote this DSA to a Global Catalog (GC).
A precondition to becoming a GC is that this server host a read-only
copy of all partitions in the enterprise.  This server should hold a
copy of partition DC=Test,DC=Shakespeare,DC=Entier,DC=Org but it does
not. This system will not be promoted to a GC until this condition is
met.

 This may be because the KCC has not run, or that it is unable to add
a replica of the partition because all of its sources are down.
Please check the event log for KCC errors.

 The KCC will retry adding the replica. "

which leads me to trying to delete the Test domain.  except I can't.
NTSDUtil gives me:

"metadata cleanup: remove selected naming context
DsRemoveDsDomainW error 0x20ab(The cross reference for the specified
naming cont
ext could not be found.)"

when trying to figure this one out, i found an article that said I had
to remove 3 items in ADSI Edit.  But when i try to get rid of the
partition I get told that a refferal was returned from the server.

When i go searching for help with this, I am told it is because I do
not have the proper FSMOs.

So I try to change the Domain naming Operations master, I can't
because it doesn't exist any more, because it died (unrecoverablly...
I know, I know).

This all becaomes improtant because my exchange server won't start
because it can't find the gc.  which i can't create, because of the
child domain problem.  Which i can't fix, because I can't transfer the
proper FSMOs.  Because the server that had the proper FSMOs died.

Please help me.  I am really at a loss, and I can't afford to loose
the emails that are sitting in exchange.  I am at a loss on how to
continue.

Thanks,
Brian G. Rice

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