Modem required for use in Europe, Asia and North America

Modem required for use in Europe, Asia and North America

Post by Walter Capita » Thu, 28 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Hi,

As the family computer geek, I have been drafted to help my sister
find a modem for her laptop that will work in Europe, Asia and North
America.  Can anyone with any experience in this area let me know what
features/configuration options a modem must have to do this, as well
as how it should be configured.  Are there any differences for
operation in Europe as opposed to Asia?

Any and all info appreciated, either posted or emailed.

Thanks,

Walter

 
 
 

Modem required for use in Europe, Asia and North America

Post by Roeland Th. Jans » Fri, 29 Dec 1995 04:00:00



>  As the family computer geek, I have been drafted to help my sister
>  find a modem for her laptop that will work in Europe, Asia and North
>  America.  Can anyone with any experience in this area let me know what
>  features/configuration options a modem must have to do this, as well
>  as how it should be configured.  Are there any differences for
>  operation in Europe as opposed to Asia?

there are differences, mainly in the reagion of dial-tone, ring & busy
detection. You could try to get a hold on a modem that has (here in this
newsgroup or in a manual) information on how to set country codes. This may
help you a lot. One that comes to mind are ZyXEL modems. There are new
ZyXEL's out so, getting an used one shouldn't be a problem if you think that
19k2 (or when ZYX isn't supported) or 14k4 max is a decent speed to work
with. I found that ZyXEL modems, esp ZYX -- ZYX connections stay at high
speeds while others (tm) may die or drop.

--


 
 
 

Modem required for use in Europe, Asia and North America

Post by Rein Wetsela » Fri, 29 Dec 1995 04:00:00



>As the family computer geek, I have been drafted to help my sister
>find a modem for her laptop that will work in Europe, Asia and North
>America.  Can anyone with any experience in this area let me know what
>features/configuration options a modem must have to do this, as well
>as how it should be configured.  Are there any differences for
>operation in Europe as opposed to Asia?

My computermagazine C!Totaal just wrote an article about this subject.
They travelled with their European bought equipment in the States. In
most of the cases it worked fine.

The made a universal checklist for traveling. Don't forget:
1. your laptop;-)
2. your laptop-power pack with AC outlet
3. your external modem and its powerpack and/or batteries
4. a telephone cable with a standard RJ-11 plug at both ends
5. AC plug(s) for several countrys, or a universal travelplug
6. local telephone numbers for connecting to an Internet provider.

The RJ-11 telephone plug is quite common in the world, so you can take
the connector out of the bottom or the back of your local phone and
connect it to the modem. As far as I understood your modem needs no
special configuration. So that sounds easy.

But beware of hotel exchanges. Sometimes it won't work on your
hotelroom. Than try to put the telephone cable in the line connector
of your modem AND connect that loose cable (4) from the phone
connector of your modem to the telephone. And don't forget to put a 0
or 9 before the number you want to choose. Otherwise you can't get out
of the hotel lines.

Take special care for the electricity: in the States they use 110
volts, in Europe 220 volts and in Asia it depents on the country you
are (110 or 220/240). Most laptops do automaticly switch to the right
currency, but watch the powerpack of your external modem. Bu sure that
you can't use your US AC plug abroad, so take a universal power plug
with you (travelclubs sell them).

Most important is, that you have a local telephone number to connect
your computer to. If you are on CompuServe, then they surely have a
local number for you.
It is a bigger problem if you have a Internet account. Your provider
stays of course at home. So the problem is to find the right local
connection. The reporters of the magazine went to local universitys en
Internet-cafe's (they even went to a congress center!) and they
succeeded.
Perhaps it is better to get numbers in advance by asking for them in
the Usenet newsgrous i.a. alt.culture. ..... Or do some WebSurfing.

CU

-------------------------------------------------------------
Rein Wetselaar - The Netherlands

-------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Modem required for use in Europe, Asia and North America

Post by Christian Weisgerb » Sun, 31 Dec 1995 04:00:00



> As the family computer geek, I have been drafted to help my sister
> find a modem for her laptop that will work in Europe, Asia and North
> America.

One that works is easy: take any North American one.

One that is legal to use in all those areas is tricky. Maybe a dozen
modems would do the job, depending on how many countries she actually
intends to visit.

Of course, whoever uses a modem "overseas" should have some basic
familiarity with phone systems and modems, in order not to stumble about
trivial things like DTMF vs. pulse dialing, dial tone recognition, etc.

--

  See another pointless homepage at <URL:http://home.pages.de/~naddy/>.
            -- currently reading: Piers Anthony, Omnivore --

 
 
 

Modem required for use in Europe, Asia and North America

Post by Ken Hildabo » Tue, 02 Jan 1996 04:00:00



Weisgerb

er) writes:


>> As the family computer geek, I have been drafted to help my sister
>> find a modem for her laptop that will work in Europe, Asia and North
>> America.

>One that works is easy: take any North American one.

>One that is legal to use in all those areas is tricky. Maybe a dozen
>modems would do the job, depending on how many countries she actually
>intends to visit.

>Of course, whoever uses a modem "overseas" should have some basic
>familiarity with phone systems and modems, in order not to stumble about
>trivial things like DTMF vs. pulse dialing, dial tone recognition, etc.

>--

>  See another pointless homepage at <URL:http://home.pages.de/~naddy/>.
>            -- currently reading: Piers Anthony, Omnivore --

I have two IBM international modems (PCMCIA) for my Thinkpad, it senses what
country you are in by listing to the dial tone and sets itself up
accordingly.


 
 
 

1. Modem Access From Europe to North America


ucalgary.ca (ROM M. KIEFFER) writes:

        Yes, you need an adapter to allow your Bell standard RJ line
cord to plug into the Dutch jack. This question is asked about once a
month -- when are the modem manufacturers going to cover it in their
manuals?

        You can make up a "works anywhere modem kit", I have posted
this before -- I will email to interested parties. For the fumble
fingered, you can buy adaptor kits. There is a fellow in the U.K that
sells them. Not cheap, but if you have screwdriver, voltmeter phobia,
they will do the job.

        He is: Teleadapt
        P.O. Box 169
        Pinner
        Middlesex HAS 5QW
        England

        Phone: +44.81.429.0479

        He has a range of kits. He offers a Europak for 100 pounds and
a Netherlands kit for an unspecified sum.

        I have never seen his products let alone tested them. But they
are a solution.

        Who cares? Do you seriously believe the modem policde are going
to come knocking?

        "Digital dial tones"? Lemme see, rotary dial, that's digital.
Touch Tone that's analogue. But I spose the question is: "Is TouchTone
the same in other countries? To all intents and purposes, yes. Yes I
know the CCITT Spec is different than the Bell spec; don't ask me
why. What about pulse dial? Well, yes, pretty much the same all over
the world -- New Zealand and Sweden being exceptions. There is a
difference in the make break ratio, but a good modem can change this.

        Busy tones etc may be different, as are dial tones -- the
noise you hear when you pick up the phone.


742 1/2 North Hayworth Avenue Hollywood CA 90046-7142 voice (213) 653-4495

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