X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Antho » Sun, 20 Apr 1997 04:00:00



Hi everyone,

        Well, after buying a usrx2 sportster from
compusa (and trying to get it to connect above 26.4k
to a local 56k x2 provider), my line failed the USR
line test (1-888-877-9248  l: line test).  I'm located
in NJ, local phone company Bell Atlantic.  What
are my options?  Is it possible that Bell Atlantic
is doing something to not allow 56k access.  The
last few weeks they have been running ISDN
advertising everywhere. Can these be related?
Should I jump to ISDN and spend the extra $$ or
is their something I can get bell atlantic to do?

thanks in advance

bal

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by wayn » Mon, 21 Apr 1997 04:00:00



> Hi everyone,

>         Well, after buying a usrx2 sportster from
> compusa (and trying to get it to connect above 26.4k
> to a local 56k x2 provider), my line failed the USR
> line test (1-888-877-9248  l: line test).  I'm located
> in NJ, local phone company Bell Atlantic.  What
> are my options?  Is it possible that Bell Atlantic
> is doing something to not allow 56k access.  The
> last few weeks they have been running ISDN
> advertising everywhere. Can these be related?
> Should I jump to ISDN and spend the extra $$ or
> is their something I can get bell atlantic to do?

> thanks in advance

> bal

I have the same problem and one thing I did was find another isp and now
I can get in at 31,200, before I could not.This isp will be trying out
x2 in a week and I hope I hope it will work, this isp is closer to me
then the other and I get a higher connect rate.I talked to amertech my
local and was amazed at how stupid these people were.tech support at my
isp said that to many analog switchs between you and there server (more
then two) would be a problem,well I got transfered eight times and only
found one person that knew what x2 was they kept trying to give me to
the isdn dept. and when I did get someone that knew what a modem was I
was told that to check my line for noise would be fify-one dollars plus
twenty for each fif* minutes,anyway if its our local lines I think we
may be *ed!!

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Guardia » Mon, 21 Apr 1997 04:00:00



Quote:> I have the same problem and one thing I did was find another isp and now
> I can get in at 31,200, before I could not.

jeez, when will you people learn, It's NOT the ISP, it's the damn phone
lines..
They are very random in quality, and often very poor, as the phone
companies don't give a shit about data, although their advertising may say
otherwise.  If your ISP has several phone #'s, try them, you'll likely find
one that's 'better'.  
 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by John Nav » Tue, 22 Apr 1997 04:00:00


[POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]


>    Well, after buying a usrx2 sportster from
>compusa (and trying to get it to connect above 26.4k
>to a local 56k x2 provider), my line failed the USR
>line test (1-888-877-9248  l: line test).  I'm located
>in NJ, local phone company Bell Atlantic.  What
>are my options?  ...

1.  Move.
2.  Be content with V.34

Quote:>Is it possible that Bell Atlantic
>is doing something to not allow 56k access.  ...

Yes, but not deliberately.

Quote:>The
>last few weeks they have been running ISDN
>advertising everywhere. Can these be related?

No.

Quote:>Should I jump to ISDN and spend the extra $$ or
>is their something I can get bell atlantic to do?

3.  Move up to ISDN.

--
Best regards,

      28800 Modem FAQ:  http://www.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Andrew Chia » Wed, 23 Apr 1997 04:00:00




>writes:

[snip]
Quote:

>When X2 works, the average reported speed is more like something between
>X1.3 and X1.5, exceptional cases notwithstanding.  When X2 doesn't work
>because of a phone line impairment, there's little or nothing that can
>be done.  Bite the bullet and get ISDN and get on with your life.
>ISDN is 128k and works out to about X4.5 at max connect speed. Even at
>single channel 64k ISDN will give you rock solid 64k connections and
>throughput of up to 7.4k bps without compression. Add compression and the
>fun really starts.

>After ISDN, 28.8/33.6/X2 (pick one) makes you want to get out and push.

Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by John Nav » Wed, 23 Apr 1997 04:00:00


[POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]


>Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
>at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
>Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

>I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
>downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
>performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
reality check.

--
Best regards,

      28800 Modem FAQ:  http://www.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Andrew Chia » Thu, 24 Apr 1997 04:00:00




>[POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]

>>Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
>>at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
>>Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

>>I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
>>downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
>>performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

I was only giving an example of the speed of the network on a fairly
large file...  I wasn't saying that's what I necessarily do all day...
:)

Quote:

>No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
>reality check.

Perhaps... but the school I just graduated from (UCLA) has had the
network (for dorm residents) and SLIP/PPP dialups (for off-campus
users) only since September 95.  Before that, the general student
population had next to nothing in terms of Internet access (at least
provided by the school), they only had email capability and Usenet
news on a fairly arcane IBM mainframe running MVS.  There was no web
access (even via a text browser), only Gopher on it.

In the case of the dorm network, it eliminated a potential 6000 users
(out of about 34000 students + staff and faculity) from dialing into a
limited pool of modems (which is rather expensive to setup and
maintain).  As a side benefit, dorm residents got awesome speeds. :)

There are many other universities that have installed networks in
their dorms and provided dial-up access to their students, staff, and
faculity.  I wouldn't be surprised if some of it is just in response
to competing schools and having to keep up...

As for my school having something like this, it's at least something
to show for considering that UCLA is considered to be in a sense, the
"birthplace" of the Internet.  It was node number 1 (amongst 4) of the
original ARPAnet.

>--
>Best regards,

>      28800 Modem FAQ:  http://www.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by ron » Thu, 24 Apr 1997 04:00:00



> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]

> >Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
> >at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
> >Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

> >I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
> >downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
> >performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

> No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
> reality check.

> --
> Best regards,

>       28800 Modem FAQ:  http://www.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html

Academics are not well known (generally) for living in reality.  But, we
keep paying the bills huh John?
good luck, Ron
 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Chris Murph » Thu, 24 Apr 1997 04:00:00



> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]

> >Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
> >at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
> >Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

> >I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
> >downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
> >performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

> No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
> reality check.

Just think how much higher those costs would be if schools used modems
for student access instead of ethernet.....

--
"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of
death I shall fear no evil, for I am at angels
eight-zero and climbing...."        
                               -- Anonymous SR-71 pilot
=======================================================

phone: 617-253-8400                 fax:   617-258-8736

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Timothy Hue » Fri, 25 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Anthony,
There is a possible fix that worked for at a friends house that I was
installing an X2 modem at. The phone line was non-X2 capable (I.E. it
had multiple Analog to Digital conversion from the house to the Phone
Company). Here is the fix:

1. Go to your neighbors homes and take your computer or just your modem
and do the linetest.exe on their phone lines.

2. If you find a phone line that is X2 capable (usually the newer lines
in the neighborhood) make sure that no one is using that line for an X2
modem or plans to in the near future.

3. Contact your local Phone company and have them do a site visit.

4. When the technician arrives, explain your problem (be nice) and tell
him that you want the X2 line and your line swapped at the local box. If
you want to keep the numbers going to the right homes (i.e. you don't
want to swap telephone numbers with your neighbor) then ask him to do
that. He will have to reprogram the EO (whatever the hell that is) at
the Switch. Since one line has some analog wiring, that line might be
without phone service until a technician can rewire the phone line. The
digital line is easy to reprogram the phone number.

5. This should have you up at X2 speeds shortly. It might cost some
money if you don't have a line maintenance plan with your phone
company.

My friends house is operating at 48000 consistently now. Although he
doesn't use it cause he is never home. Gesh!! All that work for nuthin.

On a side note, ISDN?was GREAT!!! For the past 2 years I have been 128k
ISDN with compression. I have enjoyed it immensely, however, I?believe
ISDN's time is limited. Much better solutions are in the making. Cable
modems are coming and I'm switching this summer. Over 1meg each way will
be too much to pass up. I would think very carefully about upgrading to
ISDN (very expensive initial investment). Contact your local phone
company and see if there are any per minute charges on your ISDN line
and how much installation is. Also check the cost of the basic line per
month. My line is $62.00 with no per minute charges. However, I believe
the NorthEast has larger fees and per minute charges.

Good luck!
Tim Huey

  Hi everyone,

          Well, after buying a usrx2 sportster from
  compusa (and trying to get it to connect above 26.4k
  to a local 56k x2 provider), my line failed the USR
  line test (1-888-877-9248  l: line test).  I'm located
  in NJ, local phone company Bell Atlantic.  What
  are my options?  Is it possible that Bell Atlantic
  is doing something to not allow 56k access.  The
  last few weeks they have been running ISDN
  advertising everywhere. Can these be related?
  Should I jump to ISDN and spend the extra $$ or
  is their something I can get bell atlantic to do?

  thanks in advance

  bal

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Timothy Hue » Fri, 25 Apr 1997 04:00:00


Anthony,
There is a possible fix that worked for at a friends house that I was
installing an X2 modem at. The phone line was non-X2 capable (I.E. it
had multiple Analog to Digital conversion from the house to the Phone
Company). Here is the fix:

1. Go to your neighbors homes and take your computer or just your modem
and do the linetest.exe on their phone lines.

2. If you find a phone line that is X2 capable (usually the newer lines
in the neighborhood) make sure that no one is using that line for an X2
modem or plans to in the near future.

3. Contact your local Phone company and have them do a site visit.

4. When the technician arrives, explain your problem (be nice) and tell
him that you want the X2 line and your line swapped at the local box. If
you want to keep the numbers going to the right homes (i.e. you don't
want to swap telephone numbers with your neighbor) then ask him to do
that. He will have to reprogram the EO (whatever the hell that is) at
the Switch. Since one line has some analog wiring, that line might be
without phone service until a technician can rewire the phone line. The
digital line is easy to reprogram the phone number.

5. This should have you up at X2 speeds shortly. It might cost some
money if you don't have a line maintaince/wiring plan with your phone
company.

My friends house is operating at 48000 consistently now. Although he
doesn't use it cause he is never home. Gesh!! All that work for nuthin.

On a side note, ISDN?was GREAT!!! For the past 2 years I have been 128k
ISDN with compression. I have enjoyed it emensly, however, I?believe
ISDN's time is limited. Much better solutions are in the making. Cable
modems are comming and I'm switching this summer. Over 1meg each way
will be too much to pass up. I would think very carefully about
upgrading to ISDN (very expensive initial investment). Contact your
local phone company and see if there are any per minute charges on your
ISDN line and how much installation is. Also check the cost of the basic
line per month. My line is $62.00 with no perminute charges. However, I
believe the NorthEast has larger fees and perminute charges.

Good luck!
Tim Huey

  Hi everyone,

          Well, after buying a usrx2 sportster from
  compusa (and trying to get it to connect above 26.4k
  to a local 56k x2 provider), my line failed the USR
  line test (1-888-877-9248  l: line test).  I'm located
  in NJ, local phone company Bell Atlantic.  What
  are my options?  Is it possible that Bell Atlantic
  is doing something to not allow 56k access.  The
  last few weeks they have been running ISDN
  advertising everywhere. Can these be related?
  Should I jump to ISDN and spend the extra $$ or
  is their something I can get bell atlantic to do?

  thanks in advance

  bal

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by John Nav » Fri, 25 Apr 1997 04:00:00


[POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]



>> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]

>> >Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
>> >at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
>> >Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

>> >I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
>> >downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
>> >performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

>> No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
>> reality check.

>Just think how much higher those costs would be if schools used modems
>for student access instead of ethernet.....

And how much lower if the expensive high-speed Internet connection were
not being wasted with game software downloads.  Not to mention games being
played on research supercomputers.  And on and on.

Free resources inevitably get abused, so well-managed organizations charge
back departments for use of IT resources.  If students were given metered
accounts, I'm willing to bet that IT costs in academia would drop
substantially.

--
Best regards,

      28800 Modem FAQ:  http://www.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Anthony Sii » Fri, 25 Apr 1997 04:00:00




> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]


> >> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]

> >> >Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
> >> >at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
> >> >Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

> >> >I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
> >> >downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
> >> >performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

> >> No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
> >> reality check.

> >Just think how much higher those costs would be if schools used modems
> >for student access instead of ethernet.....

> And how much lower if the expensive high-speed Internet connection were
> not being wasted with game software downloads.  Not to mention games being
> played on research supercomputers.  And on and on.

> Free resources inevitably get abused, so well-managed organizations charge
> back departments for use of IT resources.  If students were given metered
> accounts, I'm willing to bet that IT costs in academia would drop
> substantially.

I doubt it because the incremental cost of adding those 10bT connections
to the dorm is very small.  The vast majority of network use at a
University is used by the faculty and staff.  Also, having those dorms
networked means that the University doesn't have to provide additional
dial-in access for all of those students on the network which is much more
costly than the 10bT network connections.

Anthony

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by Stephen Willia » Sat, 26 Apr 1997 04:00:00



>>> No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
>>> reality check.

>>Just think how much higher those costs would be if schools used modems
>>for student access instead of ethernet.....

>And how much lower if the expensive high-speed Internet connection were
>not being wasted with game software downloads.  Not to mention games being
>played on research supercomputers.  And on and on.

>Free resources inevitably get abused, so well-managed organizations charge
>back departments for use of IT resources.  If students were given metered
>accounts, I'm willing to bet that IT costs in academia would drop
>substantially.

I'm not as sure as you are that the bandwidth is really the most
important thing here. My impression is that it is the initial costs of
installing the system that are high but that once the system is in
place it is really very cheap to operate -- far cheaper than having
people use modems and a modem pool (remember that the campus still has
to be wired to telephones).

Sure games get played on supercomputers but I'm not sure that that is
what a majority of a student's time is spent doing. Certainly that
wasn't my experience and I doubt that things have changed much since.
Most college students work pretty damned hard I'd say.

Recently Penang, Malaysia announced a project whereby they intended to
wire up the entire town for high-speed network access similar to the
way many college campuses are now being wired. I believe that the
project is meant to be a very quick project and they're looking to get
everyone "on-line" very soon. This is impressive because Penanag is
not a small island and they seemed intent on including everyone and
not just those in the centre of town.

To me this seems to be the way to go for the future.

I'm wondering if anyone else has heard anything of this project and
can supply any more information on it. I've also heard of one
California town that decided that it was cheaper to build their own
network and then sell capacity to private parties but I don't remember
which one.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

S.
=====================================================================
           Stephen J. Williams, G.P.O. Box 3884, Hongkong
        Telephone: +852-2816-7336, Facsimile: +852-2816-7446

          PGP key http://www.ucc.uconn.edu/~jewil/sjw.html
PGP key fingerprint: 4E 11 E5 BB 3F 2D E8 56  AC 10 2F 49 5C 82 9B BB
=====================================================================

 
 
 

X2 - My line failed USR Line Test..

Post by John Nav » Sat, 26 Apr 1997 04:00:00


[POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]




>> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]


>> >> [POSTED TO comp.dcom.modems]

>> >> >Actually... after having switched 10Base-T Ethernet in your dorm room
>> >> >at school which eventually leads to a T3 line out the rest of the
>> >> >Internet... even 128kpbs ISDN seems slow, and 28.8 is intolerable! :(

>> >> >I've had rates as high as >340K/sec (YES, kiloBYTES per SECOND)
>> >> >downloading Quake shareware off ftp.cdrom.com!  but that kinda of
>> >> >performance is kinda rare... more like 20-80K/sec typically.

>> >> No wonder college costs are spiraling out of control.  Academia needs a
>> >> reality check.

>> >Just think how much higher those costs would be if schools used modems
>> >for student access instead of ethernet.....

>> And how much lower if the expensive high-speed Internet connection were
>> not being wasted with game software downloads.  Not to mention games being
>> played on research supercomputers.  And on and on.

>> Free resources inevitably get abused, so well-managed organizations charge
>> back departments for use of IT resources.  If students were given metered
>> accounts, I'm willing to bet that IT costs in academia would drop
>> substantially.

>I doubt it because the incremental cost of adding those 10bT connections
>to the dorm is very small.  The vast majority of network use at a
>University is used by the faculty and staff.  Also, having those dorms
>networked means that the University doesn't have to provide additional
>dial-in access for all of those students on the network which is much more
>costly than the 10bT network connections.

My reference was to the T3 to the Internet.

--
Best regards,

      28800 Modem FAQ:  http://www.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html