Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Post by Richard A Herndo » Sun, 29 Dec 1996 04:00:00



Norbert,
I too have spent many frustrating hours with the same type USR modem trying
to get distinctive ring to work after several years of SatisFAXtion! I have
tried a number of different programs including QuickLink, RapidComm, WinFax
PRO7.5 and now FocalPoint with no success. Global Village tech support
informed me that FP will not work with this modem because USR used a
non-standard form of distinctive ring.
USR will not reply to my questions regarding this except to send a document
list. Hopefully, someone will have a solution.
Good Luck.
--Richard

 
 
 

Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Post by Norbert E. Kreme » Sun, 29 Dec 1996 04:00:00





>>Norbert,
>>I too have spent many frustrating hours with the same type USR modem trying
>>to get distinctive ring to work after several years of SatisFAXtion! I have
>>tried a number of different programs including QuickLink, RapidComm, WinFax
>>PRO7.5 and now FocalPoint with no success. Global Village tech support
>>informed me that FP will not work with this modem because USR used a
>>non-standard form of distinctive ring.

As far as I'm concerned, there are 2 de facto standards, since there
are 2 main switches used in the USA.   The AT&T switch has the Bell
imprimateur, following the Bellcore standard, but the 2nd standard
used by Northern Telecom DMS100 is very prevalent.  I think USR is
telling a good fraction of their customers that the modem is not DR
compatible on their systems.

Quote:>>USR will not reply to my questions regarding this except to send a document
>>list. Hopefully, someone will have a solution.


indicate ATTN: Larry C.   Attach a copy of my original post.   It's
squeeky wheel time here, and USR needs to apply the oil.

Quote:>I'd be *very* curious here to find out whether a USR "Courier
>V.Everything" would work as desired in your application since it
>(the Courier) supposedly is in full compliance with the published
>BELLCORE specification for distinctive ring.

The 1171 also follows the  Bellcore standard, according to USR.
That's not the issue.   The question is whether the Courier can deal
with the non-Bellcore standard used by the DMS100.    In retrospect, I
could have bought the Courier for the price of the Sportster plus all
the money I've wasted waiting on hold for Sportster tech support.

Quote:> If the Courier doesn't
>work then likely the 'ring cadencing' is non-standard and
>there's absolutely nothing you can do about it.

NYNEX admits that the DMS100 does not follow the Bellcore std.  This
is all spelled out in my first post.

Quote:>However, if the Courier works and the Sportster doesn't (in regards to
>distinctive ring detection) then your beef is with the modem mfr.

My beef is still with the modem mfr.   The Bellcore std. was not
handed down with the 10 Commandments.   It's up to the modem mfrs' to
take account of the current state of the telco industry, and make
equipment that's compatible with both de facto standards.  I'm not
about to get NYNEX to change the pattern for me, and a *lot* of other
people are in the same boat.     I'm looking at other modem brands
now, since other mfrs have previously made equipment that worked fine
on both stds.

Quote:>But please, lets be fair to all parties in our assessment of whether it
>works or doesn't.  If either modem is able to differentiate one incoming
>ring cadence from another (regardless whether it =thinks= it's RING A,
>B, C, or D) then I would argue that DR detection is functional and it's
>simply a matter of semantics.  Also, since some telco offices still use
>"flash ring", where the initial starting burst can come anywhere in the
>ring cycle, I would want to have the modem set to answer on a minimum of
>two rings.

agreed, but this is not a problem of semantics.   My 1171 recognizes
any 3 ring pattern delivered by a DMS100  as the 2-ring pattern.
Patterns  B, C or  D all get recognized as B, at the hardware level,
the modem reply string tells the story.

I have now verified that my 1171 modem fails at 2 different locations
served by DMS100 equipment.  B,C,or D always get picked up as B.  The
only question remaining is whether it's just this particular modem, or
whether all 1171's are affected by design.  I'm going to exchange my
modem to answer this question.

Could someone please answer this:  In the 1171, what is the threshold
used to discriminate between a short and a long ring?

Thanks to all responders,   Norbert



 
 
 

Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Post by Jim Thoms » Thu, 16 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Norbert,

>I recently purchased a US Robotics Sportster Voice Internal 33.6
>Faxmodem with Voice Personal Mail. (model 1171).   I bought this
>product with the specific intention of setting up a voice-menuing
>system to be used with 3 distinctive ring patterns on a single
>incoming line.

>This is a long post, so I'll give the bottom line first, and then
>follow with all the gory details.  The Sportster Voice distinctive
>ringing feature is not compatible with Northern Telecom's DMS100
>switch, so if your telephone company uses this type of switch
>equipment you are out of luck. NYNEX tells me that the Northern
>Telecom DMS100 switch is one of two types of switch equipment commonly
>used  (on up to half of the circuits in their territory).  In two
>areas that I have checked, Port Jefferson, LI, New York, and
>Brookline, Mass. Nynex uses the DMS100, although they use an AT&T
>switch in other areas of the same cities. I don't know if the
>Sportster Voice works well with the AT&T switch, I have been unable to
>test this.

The Switch is not the problem. The problem is a matter of
adhering to Cadences. The modem answers the appropriate RING
when it see's the ring. It needs to receive a certain RING
pattern in order to answer the call. Below are the ring
patterns. If the Switch and Software does not follow these
pattern the modem will not answer.

Type A: 2.0s on, 4s off

       +------------------+
       |                  |
       |                  |
 ------+                  +----------------------

Type B: .8s on, .4s off,  .8s on

       +------+    +------+
       |      |    |      |
       |      |    |      |
 ------+      +----+      +----------------------

Type C: .4s on, .2s off, .4s on, .2s off,  .8s on

       +--+  +--+  +------+
       |  |  |  |  |      |
       |  |  |  |  |      |
 ------+  +--+  +--+      +----------------------

Type D: .3s on, .2s off, 1.0s on,  .2s off,  .3s on

       +-+  +--------+  +-+
       | |  |        |  | |
       | |  |        |  | |
 ------+ +--+        +--+ +----------------------

- Show quoted text -

>After waiting about 20 minutes on toll-hold, a technician guided me
>through the setup process.  It turns out that the PNP features of the
>1171 will set the modem up to COM3, IRQ7, if it detects COM1 and COM2
>as being used, and if IRQ5 is in use, as it is on my system.  Does
>your LPT port use IRQ7 also?  Too bad, the PNP features of the 1171
>will still use  IRQ7, and you will have a problem that will not be
>reported.  Win95 Control Panel, System, Device Manager, did not report
>the problem, and reported "no conflict" under each device inlcuding
>com1, com2, lpt1, and the modem on com3.   Solution:  Give up the
>com2 port, since I need the LPT port.

>HINT for USR:   PNP is very nice, but more choice in IRQ's is even
>nicer.  Why do you limit the 1171 to IRQ's  2,3,4,5 & 7?  Why don't
>you offer  9,10,11, & 12 as additional options?   There are lots of us
>that need  2 com ports plus the modem and have sound cards and lpt
>ports too.  

The modem is a 8 bit card, so it will only use IRQ 0-7. It
would have to be a 16 bit card to accomplish this. If your
Sound Card is a 16 bit card, then assign it a higher IRQ.

- Show quoted text -

>I decided to plunge into setting up the distinctive ringing features
>without waiting for the new RCV or User's Guide.   It's just as well,
>since there is not one word in the User's Guide about DR.  There is
>also nothing in the USR hardware book "Installation and
>Troubleshooting" about DR.  Time to call USR Tech support again.
>Toll-hold once more for about 20 minutes, to be told that I must edit
>the hardware.ini file for RCV, to set DistRingSupported=TRUE, changing
>from the default FALSE setting.  You may then enter RCV modem setup
>and verify the settings of the  S41 register on/off and the RING A, B,
>C,D reporting strings.   (Use "default" settings to autodetect.)
>Sure, this is easy to do, once you are told how, but it is completely
>undocumented. Don't be misled by information at
>http://ae.pcd.usr.com/techref/ATCHP4.htm
>There is discussion there of S41 register, but it has nothing to do
>with DR  (???).

>HINT for USR:  If you have time enough to design a new feature, and
>print new boxes that proudly proclaim  "Caller ID and Distinctive
>Ring"  then make the time to print an addendum to your manual showing
>the S registers and necessary editing of setup files.

I agree......

>Now comes the fun part.  I wanted to set up DR for a typical home
>office situation.   DR uses different ring patterns or cadences, which
>I will call A, B, C, D, following the USR terminology.  

Following terminology most of the industry uses. <g>

>RingA is one
>very long ring, Ring B is two long rings,  Ring C is 3 rings, short,
>short, long.   Ring D is 3 rings too, short, long, short.    I wanted
>RCV to ignore RingA, the line for personal use and/or answering
>machine independent of the computer.  I wanted RingB to activate the
>voice mailbox features of RCV, and I wanted RingD to activate the
>fax/modem features only of RCV.   (Note: In many areas of the country,
>you may subscribe to 3 DR patterns, and you will be assigned RingA,
>RingB and one of RingC or D.  I am not aware of any telcos that offer
>four DR patterns, which could use A, B, C, D, but they may be out
>there.  

Ring D is very difficult to implement. Not many applications
or modems support this correctly (With the exception of our
Courier). The Sportster does not implement this RING type
and see's it as a RING B because it uses the same amount of
pulses and in a way close to it.

>In any event, you normally do not have any say in what
>patterns your telco gives you, and A,B, D seems to becoming more
>common.)

I do not know if your TELCO WOULD implement a RING C instead
of a RING D. Considering it is probably controlled by
software, it should be easy to change. I also want to know
how you have found out RING A, B, and D are most often used?
Is this only NYNEX or is this with Ameritech, Bell South,
etc.

>After much experimentation, I determined that when I called the line
>connected to RingD, the modem was answering with the setting I had
>chose for RingB.   (Ring B also activated the RingB setting.)
>Another call to USR tech support was made. After another long
>toll-hold, I was kicked upstairs to "Level 2  Support Operations" and
>given Call Reference number  1411612.   Troubleshooting involved using
>the Terminal mode of RCV, and watching the modem readout while the USR
>technician called back on each of my 3 DR numbers.   Sure enough,  the
>first 2 worked just fine, and the third pattern  (D pattern) failed.
>Instead of reading out RingD on the RCV Terminal mode screen, it
>alternated RingB, RingA, RingB, RingA, on different lines.  Thus, the
>fault is within the modem hardware and the RCV software is just doing
>its job and answering in B mode, when the modem reports "Ring B" to
>it.

Again, RING D is not supported in the Sportster product. The
Courier does support RING D.

>Followup troubleshooting with Nynex Repair service identified the
>specific problem.  Briefly, USR defines a "very long ring" as a 2
>second burst of ringing voltage, a "long ring" as 800 msec, and a
>"short ring" as 200 msec.    The intergroup interval is 4 seconds.
>Details are at  http://ae.pcd.usr.com/techref/dring.htm

See above patterns.

>USR tells me that the pattern at this www page follows the BellCore
>standard.  NYNEX tells me that in both Long Island and Boston areas,
>the lines that I use are served by a Northern Telecom DMS100 switch.
>Unfortunately, the DR patterns used by the DMS100 are different from
>the ones USR uses.  A short ring on the DMS100 is  500 msec of ringing
>voltage followed by 500 msec silence.   A long ring on the DMS100 is 1
>second on, followed by 500 msec off.   The intergroup interval is 3 or
>3.5 seconds.    From these specs, and the behavior of the modem, it is
>clear that the 500 msec  short burst of the DMS100 is detected by the
>USR 1171 as a long ring.  Presumably, these patterns are coded into
>firmware, but in any event they are not adjustable by the user.

AH HAH.... Again the problem is based on Cadences which are
programmed into the modem. These Cadences are based on the
top 3 used. RING A, RING B and RING C. Also there can be a
little varation in the RING patterns. To my knowledge, the
modem isn't only looking for a timing sequence, it is also
looking for a specific amount of pulses in a specified
timefrain.  

>I called USR and reported this information in great detail to Level 2
>Support Operations, as a followup to report 1411612.  The technician
>indicated that I had no option other than to return the modem due to
>incompatability.  He did not seem to take my point that many other USR
>customers will face the same problem.

>NYNEX tells me that the Northern Telecom DMS100 is a very commonly
>used switch, one of only 2 types used in almost the entirety of the
>USA.

>HINT for USR:   You really should have another look at the distinctive
>ringing specs.  If you had done your homework on this one, you could
>easily have made the 1171 work with both types of switches.

Nothing to do with the switch, it is how it is programmed.
Also keep in mind the Sportster implements the 3 most common
Cadences.

Regards,

Jim Thomsen

U.S. Robotics
Online Support Analyst

 
 
 

Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Post by Jay R. Ashwor » Fri, 17 Jan 1997 04:00:00


: I do not know if your TELCO WOULD implement a RING C instead
: of a RING D. Considering it is probably controlled by
: software, it should be easy to change. I also want to know
: how you have found out RING A, B, and D are most often used?
: Is this only NYNEX or is this with Ameritech, Bell South,
: etc.

GTEFL uses A as your primary DN, B for a Distinctive Ring (Smart
Ring<tm> DN), C for VIP Alert, and d for Automatic Busy Redial
notification.  This is on a G-5, but I gather they're 5E's and their
lone DMS (813-281, Hyde Park, Tampa, FL) are set up the same way.

Cheers,
-- j
--

Member of the Technical Staff             Unsolicited Commercial Emailers Sued
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Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Post by Jim Thoms » Sun, 19 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Jay,

Quote:>GTEFL uses A as your primary DN, B for a Distinctive Ring (Smart
>Ring<tm> DN), C for VIP Alert, and d for Automatic Busy Redial
>notification.  This is on a G-5, but I gather they're 5E's and their
>lone DMS (813-281, Hyde Park, Tampa, FL) are set up the same way.

Thanks for the information.

Have you tried out a Sportster or Courier on a DRING line
over there? Just curious as I never have it fail over there.
Also I am wondering if this is the main (or only) TELCO
provider in the area?

Again thanks,

Jim Thomsen

U.S. Robotics Online Support

>Cheers,
>-- j
>--

>Member of the Technical Staff             Unsolicited Commercial Emailers Sued
>The Suncoast Freenet         Pedantry: It's not just a job, it's an adventure.
>Tampa Bay, Florida                                             +1 813 790 7592

 
 
 

Distinctive Ringing Woes with US Robotics Sportster Voice 33.6

Post by Jay R. Ashwor » Tue, 21 Jan 1997 04:00:00


[quoting me, though he clipped the attribution]
: >GTEFL uses A as your primary DN, B for a Distinctive Ring (Smart
: >Ring<tm> DN), C for VIP Alert, and d for Automatic Busy Redial
: >notification.  This is on a G-5, but I gather they're 5E's and their
: >lone DMS (813-281, Hyde Park, Tampa, FL) are set up the same way.

: Have you tried out a Sportster or Courier on a DRING line
: over there? Just curious as I never have it fail over there.
: Also I am wondering if this is the main (or only) TELCO
: provider in the area?

I don't have any Couriers new enough, and don't have any Sporty's at
all.

GTE is currently the only _residential_ LEC; there's some competition
for business, primarily from MFS, although a couple others are ramping.

Question: can the small footprint Courier HST++DS be upgraded to a
V.everything?  Chip swap?  Board swap?  How much?

I have 4.

Cheers,
-- jra
--

Member of the Technical Staff             Unsolicited Commercial Emailers Sued
The Suncoast Freenet         Pedantry: It's not just a job, it's an adventure.
Tampa Bay, Florida                                             +1 813 790 7592