Restoring root file systems

Restoring root file systems

Post by Adam Pric » Fri, 28 Jul 2000 04:00:00




>This pertains to Tru64 Unix:

>Should a root partition fail,  would the general procedure be to replace
>the drive and then re-install Unix from the CD with the appropriate
>partions for root,swap and proc.?   Then take a dump tape and retore the
>data to the new root file system?

>This seems the case in the documentation, but I wanted to know if anyone
>has come accross any "bugs" in the process that I would want to know
>about.

>Thanks for any tips.!

What we normally do is to just boot from cd, re-label using the label's recorded in
the Disaster Recovery Manual (This is a document we create for each server with
details of how to rebuild it). Make the filesets and file domains (again details in DR
manual), then mount the root partition, turn on the swap, use vrestore recover the
partitions and off you go.

If this is a V5.x system then you may want to look at
http://www.unix.digital.com/faqs/publications/best_practices/BP_RECRO...
which is a best practice guide to restoring the root filesystem on a Tru64 V5 system.

Hope this helps
Adam Price
PS X-posted to comp.unix.tru64 which is a newsgroup dedicated to Tru64.

 
 
 

Restoring root file systems

Post by Thomas Kem » Sat, 29 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hello -

We use a similar procedure.  In our procedure, we copied the disklabels to a
Tru64 formatted floppy.  Two floppies per system to be redundant.  (In the
beginning they were manually redirected to the floppy, but later we got lazy
and just copied the ones out of the sys_check area :) If / when we should
have a system disk failure, we restore the labels from the floppy after
having dropped to the prompt from the CDROM GUI / text menu.  This way, you
don't have to fiddle with editing disklabels, you just poke them back on the
pack.

Even though we use Networker to do all manner of dumps, we have vdumps of
our root_domain#root and usr_domain#usr and whatever else physically resides
on the system pack.  We also dump the Networker area to tape for a somewhat
quick jumpstart of the system area.

Another pretty cool thing I've seen, is to have LSM (veritas port) mirrored
root file systems.  The bootdef_dev has both mirrored disks listed.  In
theory, should you lose one of the mirrors during boot, or whenever, the
system rolls over to the other mirror.

What are you all doing for recovery practices?  Has anyone experimented with
making the bootable tape?  Is it worth it?

Thanks.



> >This pertains to Tru64 Unix:

> >Should a root partition fail,  would the general procedure be to replace
> >the drive and then re-install Unix from the CD with the appropriate
> >partions for root,swap and proc.?   Then take a dump tape and retore the
> >data to the new root file system?

> >This seems the case in the documentation, but I wanted to know if anyone
> >has come accross any "bugs" in the process that I would want to know
> >about.

> >Thanks for any tips.!

> What we normally do is to just boot from cd, re-label using the label's
recorded in
> the Disaster Recovery Manual (This is a document we create for each server
with
> details of how to rebuild it). Make the filesets and file domains (again
details in DR
> manual), then mount the root partition, turn on the swap, use vrestore
recover the
> partitions and off you go.

> If this is a V5.x system then you may want to look at

http://www.unix.digital.com/faqs/publications/best_practices/BP_RECRO...
E.HTM

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> which is a best practice guide to restoring the root filesystem on a Tru64
V5 system.

> Hope this helps
> Adam Price
> PS X-posted to comp.unix.tru64 which is a newsgroup dedicated to Tru64.


 
 
 

Restoring root file systems

Post by Adam Pric » Sun, 30 Jul 2000 04:00:00



>Hello -

>We use a similar procedure.  In our procedure, we copied the disklabels to a
>Tru64 formatted floppy.  Two floppies per system to be redundant.  (In the
>beginning they were manually redirected to the floppy, but later we got lazy
>and just copied the ones out of the sys_check area :) If / when we should
>have a system disk failure, we restore the labels from the floppy after
>having dropped to the prompt from the CDROM GUI / text menu.  This way, you
>don't have to fiddle with editing disklabels, you just poke them back on the
>pack.

>Even though we use Networker to do all manner of dumps, we have vdumps of
>our root_domain#root and usr_domain#usr and whatever else physically resides
>on the system pack.  We also dump the Networker area to tape for a somewhat
>quick jumpstart of the system area.

>Another pretty cool thing I've seen, is to have LSM (veritas port) mirrored
>root file systems.  The bootdef_dev has both mirrored disks listed.  In
>theory, should you lose one of the mirrors during boot, or whenever, the
>system rolls over to the other mirror.

>What are you all doing for recovery practices?  Has anyone experimented with
>making the bootable tape?  Is it worth it?

I keep coming back to bootable tape as it should be a good thing, but no matter
what I try I just can't make it work the way I want. The problem I have is that I can't
make it work from a ramdisk as advertised. No matter what I do it doesn't seem to
want to play.
I found some stuff in an internal dec notes conference about flags needed to pass
to the kernel on bootup from tape, but I couldn't make that work either.
After a while my 'test kit' ( a workstation that was the last of about 30 that a colleague
was rebuilding) needed to go back and so I gave up.

Adam Price

 
 
 

Restoring root file systems

Post by Chuc » Sun, 06 Aug 2000 04:00:00





>>This pertains to Tru64 Unix:

>>Should a root partition fail,  would the general procedure be to replace
>>the drive and then re-install Unix from the CD with the appropriate
>>partions for root,swap and proc.?   Then take a dump tape and retore the
>>data to the new root file system?

>>This seems the case in the documentation, but I wanted to know if anyone
>>has come accross any "bugs" in the process that I would want to know
>>about.

>>Thanks for any tips.!

>What we normally do is to just boot from cd, re-label using the label's recorded in
>the Disaster Recovery Manual (This is a document we create for each server with
>details of how to rebuild it). Make the filesets and file domains (again details in DR
>manual), then mount the root partition, turn on the swap, use vrestore recover the
>partitions and off you go.

>If this is a V5.x system then you may want to look at
>http://www.unix.digital.com/faqs/publications/best_practices/BP_RECRO...
>which is a best practice guide to restoring the root filesystem on a Tru64 V5 system.

>Hope this helps
>Adam Price
>PS X-posted to comp.unix.tru64 which is a newsgroup dedicated to Tru64.

You might also want to check into the btcreate utility (Bootable Tape
Create).  If my memory serves me, it can't be used if your system is a
clustered system (i.e. - Real 5.0 style clustering), but otherwise, it
may be what you're looking for.

Chuck Whealton

 
 
 

1. Restore root file system from tape, not working - help?

Hi everybody,

                our root file system got burnt by a power outage.
        We replaced the disk, booted from cdrom and restored from a backup tape.
        We ran installboot, but when we try to boot we get a string of the following message:

        short read
        short read
        etc

        We restored the tape to an external disk, ran installboot and we are getting a similar
        problem i.e. short read, but there's also a message about not finding swapgeneric.

        Any infornation that could be helpful will be greatly appreciated.

        TIA

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