config files

config files

Post by Kevin Ratcliff » Sat, 05 Jul 2003 03:58:32



Hi

Can anybody please tell me how the
"$id: blah! blah!,v 1.4 2003/05/23 04:47:39 blah Exp $"
are created in the config files.  They are also on the netbsd webpages
in the footers.

Kev

 
 
 

config files

Post by Ben Ellisto » Sat, 05 Jul 2003 08:33:02



> Can anybody please tell me how the "$id: blah! blah!,v 1.4
> 2003/05/23 04:47:39 blah Exp $" are created in the config files.
> They are also on the netbsd webpages in the footers.

They a special keywords that are expanded by RCS/CVS when the files
are checked out.  In this case, putting "$Id$" anywhere in the file
will trigger the expansion as shown above.

Ben

 
 
 

config files

Post by Karsten Krus » Sat, 05 Jul 2003 08:09:41



> Can anybody please tell me how the
> "$id: blah! blah!,v 1.4 2003/05/23 04:47:39 blah Exp $"
> are created in the config files.

They are CVS-Keywords:
http://www.cvshome.org/docs/manual/cvs-1.11.6/cvs_12.html#SEC100

Karsten

--
        Homepage, Mac68k, A/UX-Links und Shorties: www.tecneeq.de
  ()    Linux/NetBSD-Anleitungen, Forum  und Chat: www.newbie-net.de
 <\/>
 _/\_   When you are in it up to your ears, keep your mouth shut.

 
 
 

config files

Post by Igor Sobrad » Sat, 05 Jul 2003 20:43:36




> They a special keywords that are expanded by RCS/CVS when the files
> are checked out.  In this case, putting "$Id$" anywhere in the file
> will trigger the expansion as shown above.

What I cannot fully understand is why the source files state
is tagged as "Exp" (experimental) instead of "Stab" (stable), or
even "Rel" (released).  Even the most experimental, state-of-the-art
branch has a lot of stable code.  Just curious.

Igor.

--

 
 
 

config files

Post by Ben Harr » Sun, 06 Jul 2003 03:26:56






>> They a special keywords that are expanded by RCS/CVS when the files
>> are checked out.  In this case, putting "$Id$" anywhere in the file
>> will trigger the expansion as shown above.

>What I cannot fully understand is why the source files state
>is tagged as "Exp" (experimental) instead of "Stab" (stable), or
>even "Rel" (released).  Even the most experimental, state-of-the-art
>branch has a lot of stable code.  Just curious.

Because "Exp" is the state that new files get, and there's never been any
good reason to change it.  I'm not even sure I know _how_ to change it...

--
Ben Harris
Unix Support, University of Cambridge Computing Service.
  If I wanted to speak for the University, I'd be in ucam.comp-serv.announce.

 
 
 

config files

Post by Ben Ellisto » Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:54:22



> >What I cannot fully understand is why the source files state
> >is tagged as "Exp" (experimental) instead of "Stab" (stable), or
> >even "Rel" (released).  Even the most experimental, state-of-the-art
> >branch has a lot of stable code.  Just curious.
> Because "Exp" is the state that new files get, and there's never
> been any good reason to change it.  I'm not even sure I know _how_
> to change it...

rcs -s.  See man rcs and search for "state".

Cheers, Ben

 
 
 

config files

Post by Marco van de Voor » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 20:24:13




>>> are checked out.  In this case, putting "$Id$" anywhere in the file
>>> will trigger the expansion as shown above.

>>What I cannot fully understand is why the source files state
>>is tagged as "Exp" (experimental) instead of "Stab" (stable), or
>>even "Rel" (released).  Even the most experimental, state-of-the-art
>>branch has a lot of stable code.  Just curious.

> Because "Exp" is the state that new files get, and there's never been any
> good reason to change it.  I'm not even sure I know _how_ to change it...

It's possile that CVS state info is not used, but the different branches are
described by tags.
 
 
 

config files

Post by Igor Sobrad » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 22:23:53




>> Because "Exp" is the state that new files get, and there's never been any
>> good reason to change it.  I'm not even sure I know _how_ to change it...
> It's possile that CVS state info is not used, but the different branches are
> described by tags.

Indeed.  Those tags provide information about the current status of a
file; not all files have the same status on a given branch (e.g., most
files on a development branch have a stable status) but, as observed by
Marco van de Voort, even if state info is not used to identify the status
of a given file it can be useful to identify files on a branch.  It is
cleaner for end-users seeing that files on a development branch are
marked as experimental (i.e., Exp), and files on production branches
are identified as either stable (i.e., Stab) or production (i.e., Rel).

Cheers,
Igor.

--

 
 
 

config files

Post by Ben Harr » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 22:58:01






>>> Because "Exp" is the state that new files get, and there's never been any
>>> good reason to change it.  I'm not even sure I know _how_ to change it...

>> It's possile that CVS state info is not used, but the different branches are
>> described by tags.

>Indeed.  Those tags provide information about the current status of a
>file; not all files have the same status on a given branch (e.g., most
>files on a development branch have a stable status) but, as observed by
>Marco van de Voort, even if state info is not used to identify the status
>of a given file it can be useful to identify files on a branch.  It is
>cleaner for end-users seeing that files on a development branch are
>marked as experimental (i.e., Exp), and files on production branches
>are identified as either stable (i.e., Stab) or production (i.e., Rel).

The major problem with this is that the state of a file is the property of
a revision.  This means that in order to have the release branch be marked
as "Stab" while the trunk was marked "Exp", we'd have to add a new revision
to _every_ file in the tree at every branch point (and presumably another
new revision when the release was tagged, to be marked "Rel").  This would
be a really quite large amount of thrash (most file probably don't actually
get modified between a branch point and a release at the moment) for little
gain.

--
Ben Harris
Unix Support, University of Cambridge Computing Service.
  If I wanted to speak for the University, I'd be in ucam.comp-serv.announce.