memory range - IO range

memory range - IO range

Post by sridh » Wed, 06 Feb 2002 23:55:15



sorry cos its not a unix specific question. i noticed that some
devices like the NIC and graphics adapter have a "memory"range and IO
range ( i actually saw it in windows). does memory range mean that
these devices have direct access ( not DMA/bus mastering) to the
system memory? or does is pertain to memory that is present in the
device which is mapped ? if so what does IO range mean? does unix
handle it the same way? i posted in comp.hardware and a winx group..
but i cudn't get satisfactory answers.
 
 
 

memory range - IO range

Post by Tony Finc » Thu, 07 Feb 2002 01:39:12



>sorry cos its not a unix specific question. i noticed that some
>devices like the NIC and graphics adapter have a "memory"range and IO
>range ( i actually saw it in windows). does memory range mean that
>these devices have direct access ( not DMA/bus mastering) to the
>system memory? or does is pertain to memory that is present in the
>device which is mapped ? if so what does IO range mean? does unix
>handle it the same way? i posted in comp.hardware and a winx group..
>but i cudn't get satisfactory answers.

A device with a memory range occupies part of the system's memory map
(back in the 8086 days this would have been between 640K and 1024K).
Intel CPUs have additional IO instructions which access a separate
64K address space; many other CPUs don't have this and map all devices
into the main address space.

Tony.
--

SHANNON: CYCLONIC BECOMING NORTHWEST 6 TO GALE 8, OCCASIONALLY SEVERE GALE 9.
SQUALLY SHOWERS. GOOD.

 
 
 

memory range - IO range

Post by Gennady Kuznetso » Thu, 07 Feb 2002 20:12:13



Quote:>sorry cos its not a unix specific question. i noticed that some
>devices like the NIC and graphics adapter have a "memory"range and IO
>range ( i actually saw it in windows). does memory range mean that
>these devices have direct access ( not DMA/bus mastering) to the
>system memory? or does is pertain to memory that is present in the
>device which is mapped ? if so what does IO range mean? does unix
>handle it the same way? i posted in comp.hardware and a winx group..
>but i cudn't get satisfactory answers.

Depending on architecture the IO address space can be:
1)  the part of memory address space (as in Motorola 680x0, Alpha), accesed
by conventional
memory access instructions
2)  the separate address space (as in Intel 80x86), accesed by special
instructions for IO (outb, inb).

In either case the addresses in the IO address space are mapped to the
memory units on
the device board...

gk

 
 
 

memory range - IO range

Post by sridh » Fri, 08 Feb 2002 03:09:40


I still have some doubts . i understand the basic diff between memory
mapped IO and separate instr/address space for IO. but what do these
memory ranges mean?
i have pasted the resource specs of my NIC

Input/Output range E800-E8FF
Memory Range - FEBEFC00-FEBEFFFF -> pl explain this
Interrupt request -  10

Intel box and the NIC is on a PCI slot.




> >sorry cos its not a unix specific question. i noticed that some
> >devices like the NIC and graphics adapter have a "memory"range and IO
> >range ( i actually saw it in windows). does memory range mean that
> >these devices have direct access ( not DMA/bus mastering) to the
> >system memory? or does is pertain to memory that is present in the
> >device which is mapped ? if so what does IO range mean? does unix
> >handle it the same way? i posted in comp.hardware and a winx group..
> >but i cudn't get satisfactory answers.

> Depending on architecture the IO address space can be:
> 1)  the part of memory address space (as in Motorola 680x0, Alpha), accesed
> by conventional
> memory access instructions
> 2)  the separate address space (as in Intel 80x86), accesed by special
> instructions for IO (outb, inb).

> In either case the addresses in the IO address space are mapped to the
> memory units on
> the device board...

> gk

 
 
 

memory range - IO range

Post by Doug Hocki » Fri, 08 Feb 2002 07:58:51


Quote:> Input/Output range E800-E8FF
> Memory Range - FEBEFC00-FEBEFFFF -> pl explain this

It means there is hardware on the board that responds
the addresses E800-E8FF in the I/O address space and
also hardware that responds to addresses
FEBEFC00-FEBEFFFF in the memory address space.  You'll
have to get a hardware manual for the NIC to find
out what happens when those addresses are accessed.

There's also often hardware on such boards that
can do DMA (Direct Memory Access), so the board
can makes it's own accesses to system memory
without the intervention of the main CPU.

-- Doug

 
 
 

1. Monitor Sync range Versus Scan range

Greetings everyone,

Here is a dumb question for you. Is the synchronization range (Which
Redhat 4.2 claims is in our monitor's manual) the same thing as the scan
range? My manual (for Gateway 2000 Vivitron 17'')specifies the scan
frequency (31.5-80 kHz Horizontal; 50-100 Hz Vertical) but there is
nothing mentioned of synchronization.

I have tried substituting scan range for sysnc range during the setup,
but  I can not get the XFree86 (or any other X) to work. I have also
tried to extract information about synch. from the Windows 95 control
panels. But sysnch parameters appear to be a discret set of '+' or '-',
not a range of frequencies. So I am confused about what exactly is meant
by synchronization. Also I am confused on how the "refresh rates" fit
here.

I am hopping that someone who has successfully used Gateway 2000
Vivitron 17'' with RedHat 4.2 can tell me what numbers should  I put for
vertical and horizontal sync rates. In general the redhat installation
does not have an entry for this monitor, so I also appreciate getting
advice on what other parameters I should customize (chose VGA or
SuperVGA, etc.). I use the Win95 settings of 16 bit, 600x800 resolution.

Thank you very much,
Ramin Sina

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