Dividing the physical memory

Dividing the physical memory

Post by Abdul Kh » Wed, 05 Mar 2003 18:29:30



Hi Folks,

I am trying to divide the memory into 2 parts, such that one OS
executes in the first section of memory and the other OS in the second
section.
What I mean here is, assuming that I have 512MB of memory in my
system, with windows and linux installed, I would want windows to run
in the 0-255MB area and linux in the 256-512MB area.

Does anybody have any idea as to how can I accomplish this ??

Thanks,
-ARK

 
 
 

Dividing the physical memory

Post by Steve Moecke » Wed, 05 Mar 2003 21:46:46


* Abdul Khan:

Quote:>  I am trying to divide the memory into 2 parts, such that one OS
>  executes in the first section of memory and the other OS in the second
>  section.
>  What I mean here is, assuming that I have 512MB of memory in my
>  system, with windows and linux installed, I would want windows to run
>  in the 0-255MB area and linux in the 256-512MB area.

>  Does anybody have any idea as to how can I accomplish this ??

Call IBM and ask them to sell you a zSeries mainframe.

SCNR
Steve

 
 
 

Dividing the physical memory

Post by Lew Pitche » Fri, 07 Mar 2003 13:21:38



> Hi Folks,

> I am trying to divide the memory into 2 parts, such that one OS
> executes in the first section of memory and the other OS in the second
> section.
> What I mean here is, assuming that I have 512MB of memory in my
> system, with windows and linux installed, I would want windows to run
> in the 0-255MB area and linux in the 256-512MB area.

> Does anybody have any idea as to how can I accomplish this ??

Well, we can't answer this until we know what "virtual machine" software
you will be using to run the two operating systems side-by-side in. The
configuration for VM software is probably outside the scope of
comp.unix.internals, however, so you might have to repost your question
to a newsgroup that takes your VM as it's subject.

OTOH, if you _aren't_ using a VM to multiplex operating systems, then
you probably misunderstand what a "dual boot" or "dual Operating System"
system is all about. Without a VM, you can only run one operating system
at a time, and you would not gain any benefit from restricting the
operating system to a particular range of memory addresses, reserving
the others for an operating system that _isn't_ running.

AFAIK, neither Linux nor MSWindows offers options to place the OS (and
it's userland programs) into a specific address range. The closest Linux
gets to this is the specification of the maximum address it can use, and
a list of excluded address ranges. I believe that the exclusion list
cannot exclude anything in the lower 640Kb range on an Intel platform.

--
Lew Pitcher

Master Codewright and JOAT-in-training
Registered Linux User #112576 (http://counter.li.org/)
Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.

 
 
 

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