Tasks & Process

Tasks & Process

Post by Amri » Wed, 11 Jun 2003 13:07:17



Hi,

In Linux task is treated is a kernel data structure, which holds
information about the process and signals. Is it same for all unix
variants?

But in standard literature task is defined as some thing executing in
it own virtual address space.

Please clarify...

Amrith

 
 
 

Tasks & Process

Post by Fritz » Thu, 12 Jun 2003 08:14:18



> In Linux task is treated is a kernel data structure, which holds
> information about the process and signals. Is it same for all unix
> variants?

If you're talking about threads and processes, yes.

Quote:> But in standard literature task is defined as some thing executing in
> it own virtual address space.

The process or thread is described by kernel data structures, and it runs
in its own virtual address space.

RFM
--
To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha.
                4=a  0=o  3=e  +=t

 
 
 

Tasks & Process

Post by Amri » Sat, 14 Jun 2003 15:17:06




> > In Linux task is treated is a kernel data structure, which holds
> > information about the process and signals. Is it same for all unix
> > variants?

> If you're talking about threads and processes, yes.

> > But in standard literature task is defined as some thing executing in
> > it own virtual address space.

> The process or thread is described by kernel data structures, and it runs
> in its own virtual address space.

> RFM

In some docs, Threads and LWPs are different. Can u please clarify.

Amrith

 
 
 

Tasks & Process

Post by Fritz » Wed, 18 Jun 2003 07:48:58



> In some docs, Threads and LWPs are different. Can u please clarify.

In the case of user threads, that is correct.  User threads are
managed by a user-level library and are not visible to the kernel.

LWPs are managed by kernel data structures which are in turn linked to
a process data structure.  All threads that are associated with a
process have the same resources, including the memory map.

I'm writing in generalities here and specifics will vary by
implementation.

RFM