"Quit and save - Exit and don't save" why?

"Quit and save - Exit and don't save" why?

Post by Gene » Fri, 03 Dec 1999 04:00:00



When installing OpenBSD v2.5 I thought when using fdisk and disklabel
that this was a simple error but found that v2.6 is the same.

Is there any reason why not:

Quit - "Quit - don't save"
Exit - "Save and exit"

It looks to me like all software I have ever used is using the above
convention.

Eugene

 
 
 

"Quit and save - Exit and don't save" why?

Post by Joe Abl » Fri, 03 Dec 1999 04:00:00


On Thu, 02 Dec 1999 08:37:26 -0500, Gene wrote in comp.unix.bsd.openbsd.misc:

Quote:>When installing OpenBSD v2.5 I thought when using fdisk and disklabel
>that this was a simple error but found that v2.6 is the same.

>Is there any reason why not:

>Quit - "Quit - don't save"
>Exit - "Save and exit"

>It looks to me like all software I have ever used is using the above
>convention.

See mail(1) for an abvious example where this is not the case:

     exit    (ex or x) Effects an immediate return to the shell without modi-
             fying the user's system mailbox, his mbox file, or his edit file
             in -f.

             [...]

     quit    (q) Terminates the session, saving all undeleted, unsaved mes-
             sages in the user's mbox file in his login directory, preserving
             all messages marked with hold or preserve or never referenced in
             his system mailbox, and [...]

I have seen this convention used many times before, I am sure, but
mail(1) is the only example I can think of right now.

 
 
 

"Quit and save - Exit and don't save" why?

Post by Theo de Raad » Fri, 03 Dec 1999 04:00:00



> When installing OpenBSD v2.5 I thought when using fdisk and disklabel
> that this was a simple error but found that v2.6 is the same.

> Is there any reason why not:

> Quit - "Quit - don't save"
> Exit - "Save and exit"

> It looks to me like all software I have ever used is using the above
> convention.

Really?

You mean, like /usr/bin/mail, which does it the other way around?

--

Open Source means some restrictions apply, limits are placed, often quite
severe. Free Software has _no_ serious restrictions.  OpenBSD is Free Software.

 
 
 

"Quit and save - Exit and don't save" why?

Post by Eugene Dragoe » Sat, 04 Dec 1999 04:00:00


It's funny - two people gave me the same example - /usr/bin/mail - it
must be a killer app :)

I know using Netscape for e-mail is not cool but I have to admit that
this is what am using lately so I wouldn't know what key combinations
mail is using.

In any case this is a small issue and I would not want to argue about
it. It appeared very odd to me that I have to use quit when I what to
save the disk info but it looks like I am in the minority.

Regards,

Eugene



> > When installing OpenBSD v2.5 I thought when using fdisk and disklabel
> > that this was a simple error but found that v2.6 is the same.

> > Is there any reason why not:

> > Quit - "Quit - don't save"
> > Exit - "Save and exit"

> > It looks to me like all software I have ever used is using the above
> > convention.

> Really?

> You mean, like /usr/bin/mail, which does it the other way around?

> --

> Open Source means some restrictions apply, limits are placed, often quite
> severe. Free Software has _no_ serious restrictions.  OpenBSD is Free Software.

 
 
 

"Quit and save - Exit and don't save" why?

Post by Eugene Dragoe » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00


What about vi (or vim)? It is a part of standard Unix too but the
keystrokes (at least for exiting) make more sence. q! to really quit and
wq to write(save) and quit. I don't mind using quit when I want to exit
an application but q - for save and quit is stretching it (for me
anyways.)

I have been using computers for quite a few years - DOS, Windows, OS/2,
Linux and FreeBSD but when I was first presented with the options in the
subject of this message I was almost sure it was a mistake and was
tempted to use 'exit'.


> On Fri, 03 Dec 1999 02:33:02 -0500,

> >It's funny - two people gave me the same example - /usr/bin/mail - it
> >must be a killer app :)

> Many Unix apps don't save state, but still use quit to exit.  Try
> nslookup, ftp, telnet (command mode), etc.  What key do the likes of
> lynx or pine use to exit?  What keystroke combo does Netscape use to
> exit?  The rules for exiting change with every program.

Again - I am using Netscape instead of mail , lynx and pine.

Quote:

> >In any case this is a small issue and I would not want to argue about
> >it. It appeared very odd to me that I have to use quit when I what to
> >save the disk info but it looks like I am in the minority.

> I guess it is one of those things that makes people go ``Unix is weird!''

Indeed. But while some weirdness could be explained - vi for example
(good for touch typing) some stuff could have been improved over the
years instead of saying - this is the way things have always been.

There is too much legacy stuff in unix to make part time users crazy. A
few days ago I downloaded Nedit - very nice editor with one weird
problem the Delete key worked exactly like the Backspace key. Now what
do I do - what is wrong - configure the shell? (set -o emacs did not
help) configure something in X Windows? Configure Nedit (how?) or ask a
question just to be told that this is the way Delete key is supposed to
work because you know in some terminal made year 69 the emulation blah
blah blah

Now I feel better.

ttyl

Eugene

Quote:

> --
> William Burrow -- New Brunswick, Canada
> vi, the Gatling gun of editors;
> vim, the Tommy gun revision.    http://www.vim.org