Routing Dual-Homed Network to Share Network Resources

Routing Dual-Homed Network to Share Network Resources

Post by ulyssea » Tue, 17 Jun 2003 06:25:45



I'm running a OBSD 3.3 gateway with a hardwired nic (dc0) and a wireless nic
(wi0).  The machine is acting as a wireless accesspoint using hostap.

Been reading through documentation for route (8) and routed, as well as the
FreeBSD Handbook on advanced networking.

I'm having trouble parsing the information to understand how to set the
routing tables so that clients connecting on the wi0 can see the printing
resources and other shared network items on dc0.

wi0 serves up dhcp leases on 192.168.1.0/32 and dc0 serves up dhcp leases on
192.168.0.0/16.

Any resources such as a FAQ or howto would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks a
lot in advance for any and all help.

 
 
 

Routing Dual-Homed Network to Share Network Resources

Post by Dave Uhrin » Tue, 17 Jun 2003 06:42:04



> I'm running a OBSD 3.3 gateway with a hardwired nic (dc0) and a wireless nic
> (wi0).  The machine is acting as a wireless accesspoint using hostap.

> Been reading through documentation for route (8) and routed, as well as the
> FreeBSD Handbook on advanced networking.

Not required.

Quote:> Any resources such as a FAQ or howto would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks a
> lot in advance for any and all help.

http://openbsd.org/faq/faq6.html

 
 
 

1. Benefits of dual-homed firewall for home network?

I'm upgrading my home server from Redhat 6.1 to SuSE 8.0 mainly so I
can take advantage of the improved packet filtering.  The existing
server uses a fairly standard setup: Dialup ISP, IPCHAINS firewall
from Robert Ziegler's book, Internet sharing among Windows boxes, file
sharing with Samba, Setiathome, not much else.

My security books (Ziegler, Toxen) tell me that the firewall shouldn't
be on the same box as Samba and other important stuff.  Okay, I have
an old Pentium 133 box with 64MB RAM that I've installed SuSE 8.0 on,
and I could use that as a separate firewall box.

Is my understanding of the physical interface correct?
* Modem on serial port to the Internet.
* Ethernet card with "null hub" (reverse) cable to eth1 on the main
server.
* eth0 on the main server to the home network switch.
* Different networks for the firewall box and the main server (e.g.,
192.168.1.1 for the server and 192.168.2.1 for the firewall).

If this is correct, what does it buy me?  I assume the separate
networks improve security, but I'm lost beyond that.  All the diagrams
I've seen for a DMZ show Web servers and stuff off to the side between
the firewall and the rest of the LAN, but this doesn't really apply to
my setup.

Is there any benefit to installing a second machine as a standalone
firewall, or should I just continue with my current setup where the
firewall is on the main server?

TIA for any advice.

Mike

-----
Mike Dodd  (remove 'xspam.' when emailing)

-----------== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Uncensored Usenet News ==----------
   http://www.newsfeed.com       The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----= Over 100,000 Newsgroups - Unlimited Fast Downloads - 19 Servers =-----

2. pppd problems after kernel rebuild

3. Why won't the network forward packets in a dual-homed setup?

4. How to trap repeated Control-C?

5. How to use fwtk on linux with dual-network (Private Network + Network class C)

6. converting SOLARIS ioctl signals

7. static routing problem on dual-homed firewall

8. Printcap for HP Deskjet 660Cse

9. dual-homed routing: DSL + backup modem interfaces?

10. Routing on a dual-homed pc

11. How to access resources on UNIX network from your Windows network.

12. Sharing network resources. Solaris / NT.

13. Information/Resources for networking/routing under linux