OpenBSD free ???

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Garry Heato » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 09:59:25



I live in the UK, on a very limited budget as a single parent so I was
pleased to find a reference to the OpenBSD site where, I was told, I
could download a secure UNIX for free. I followed the directions on the
OpenBSD site for FTP downloads and duly copied the contents of 3.1/i386
to a Windows directory which took about 9 hours on my dial-up
connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
"Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

What does this mean? What's the difference? Is the CD I created useless?

I don't have 31 to buy the CDs, nor do I have the patience to wait for
delivery from the USA. I appreciate the developers need contributions
but if the site says it's free then it should mean what it says.

Regards

Garry Heaton

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Ted » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 10:24:03



> connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
> new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
> "Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
> though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

I'm not sure what you read, but either you or the author are confused.
The openbsd project does not make ISO files available for download, but
you can make your own, and you can download all the pieces.  All for free.

If you made your CD bootable, it should work fine.  If you only put the
.tgz files on it, you can still boot an install floppy and install from
the CD.

--
If you ever would give them a helping hand,
You can be sure they'll chop off the arm.
Never, ever, never trust a Klingon; you will always regret it.

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by erik » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 10:39:02




>> connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
>> new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
>> "Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
>> though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

> I'm not sure what you read, but either you or the author are confused.
> The openbsd project does not make ISO files available for download, but
> you can make your own, and you can download all the pieces.  All for free.

> If you made your CD bootable, it should work fine.  If you only put the
> .tgz files on it, you can still boot an install floppy and install from
> the CD.

Or download iso's from zedz.net. These are adapted, so no copyright
infringement.

HTH,

EJ
--
For OpenBSD pf en nat rule examples: http://www.vanwesten.net
Remove the obvious part (including the dot) for my email address

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Garry Heato » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 11:57:49


How do I make a CD bootable? Do I need to un-TAR everything? Should I
add the contents of /tools?

Garry



>>connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
>>new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
>>"Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
>>though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

> I'm not sure what you read, but either you or the author are confused.
> The openbsd project does not make ISO files available for download, but
> you can make your own, and you can download all the pieces.  All for free.

> If you made your CD bootable, it should work fine.  If you only put the
> .tgz files on it, you can still boot an install floppy and install from
> the CD.

> --
> If you ever would give them a helping hand,
> You can be sure they'll chop off the arm.
> Never, ever, never trust a Klingon; you will always regret it.

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Ted » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 13:51:52



> How do I make a CD bootable? Do I need to un-TAR everything? Should I
> add the contents of /tools?

http://www.shockley.net/obsd-bootcd.asp

Depends on your tools of course.

--
If you ever would give them a helping hand,
You can be sure they'll chop off the arm.
Never, ever, never trust a Klingon; you will always regret it.

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Theodore TOUR » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 19:19:42


Quote:> How do I make a CD bootable? Do I need to un-TAR everything? Should I
> add the contents of /tools?

> Garry

here is an explanation how the directories are placed:

126915  ./OpenBSD/3.1/i386
53      ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/booteasy
7       ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/fips/restorrb
40      ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/fips/source
339     ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/fips
682     ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools
6       ./OpenBSD/3.1/patches
278448  ./OpenBSD/3.1
278449  ./OpenBSD

[.....]
and in the current directory you obtain a file called OpenBSD.iso

hope this will help you
feel free to ask any questions
--
toury_t [G.O.B.I.E.] project
Graphic OpenBSD Installation Engine
http://www.gobie.net

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Garry Heato » Tue, 11 Jun 2002 05:33:35


I've copied the contenst of 3.1/i386 and 3.1/tools to corresponding
directories on my HD but one custom ISO is saw on a site recommended
above  was around 640Mb. It looks like I've missed something here!

I don't quite understand the figures you have quoted. Are these taken
from an ISO disk image? If so how did you know what to select from the
FTP site and what to leave out? I don't understand where the figures for
./OpenBSD3.1 and ./OpenBSD come from as the directories and files listed
below them do not add-up to 278448k.

Garry


>>How do I make a CD bootable? Do I need to un-TAR everything? Should I
>>add the contents of /tools?

>>Garry

> here is an explanation how the directories are placed:

> 126915  ./OpenBSD/3.1/i386
> 53      ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/booteasy
> 7       ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/fips/restorrb
> 40      ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/fips/source
> 339     ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools/fips
> 682     ./OpenBSD/3.1/tools
> 6       ./OpenBSD/3.1/patches
> 278448  ./OpenBSD/3.1
> 278449  ./OpenBSD

> [.....]
> and in the current directory you obtain a file called OpenBSD.iso

> hope this will help you
> feel free to ask any questions

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Alan Core » Tue, 11 Jun 2002 10:20:34


I see you've gotten lots of answers about installing from CD, but I
don't bother.  I just put the files in a directory with a short path
name I can remember, in an msdos partition on the same machine, and
install from that using the "install from disk" option and a boot
floppy.

It will ask for the drive the files are on, in wd0 or wd1 form, so you
have to know which physical drive it's on.  Then it asks for the (dos)
partition, which will usually be I.  Next it asks for the file system
type, and choosing "default" here sometimes works better than
specifying msdos.  When it asks for the directory where the files are,
specify where you put the files from the i386 directory on the FTP
server.  If you've put them in C:\obsd31\i386 you'd specify
obsd31/i386 here.  

Only those files need to be installed by the install program.  The
other files like src.tar.gz, srcsys.tar.gz, ports.tar.gz etc. that are
outside the i386 directory you can just gunzip and untar where they
belong after the installation's over and you're up and running.  There
are some inconsistencies here that can cause a mess if you're not
careful though:  the ports.tar.gz will unpack a ports directory with
all the files inside it, and srcsys.tar.gz will unpack a sys
directory, but src.tar.gz should be put into the src directory first
because untarring it spews out a whole bunch of stuff.  Ports should
end up as /usr/ports, src should be /usr/src, and then inside that
untar sys to make /usr/src/sys.

If it's going into a machine that doesn't have any msdos partitions I
use the same approach, but I use an old spare hard drive connected
temporarily.  You only need about 130 megs for the i386 directory, so
I connect it to one machine to load it, then connect to the machine
I'm installing on.  I just finished doing that with 3.1 today.

Alan Corey

On Sun, 09 Jun 2002 01:59:25 +0100, Garry Heaton


>I live in the UK, on a very limited budget as a single parent so I was
>pleased to find a reference to the OpenBSD site where, I was told, I
>could download a secure UNIX for free. I followed the directions on the
>OpenBSD site for FTP downloads and duly copied the contents of 3.1/i386
>to a Windows directory which took about 9 hours on my dial-up
>connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
>new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
>"Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
>though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

>What does this mean? What's the difference? Is the CD I created useless?

>I don't have 31 to buy the CDs, nor do I have the patience to wait for
>delivery from the USA. I appreciate the developers need contributions
>but if the site says it's free then it should mean what it says.

>Regards

>Garry Heaton

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Garry Heato » Tue, 11 Jun 2002 11:33:29


Thanks Alan. I'll try your method tomorrow and let you know how I get-on.

Garry


> I see you've gotten lots of answers about installing from CD, but I
> don't bother.  I just put the files in a directory with a short path
> name I can remember, in an msdos partition on the same machine, and
> install from that using the "install from disk" option and a boot
> floppy.

> It will ask for the drive the files are on, in wd0 or wd1 form, so you
> have to know which physical drive it's on.  Then it asks for the (dos)
> partition, which will usually be I.  Next it asks for the file system
> type, and choosing "default" here sometimes works better than
> specifying msdos.  When it asks for the directory where the files are,
> specify where you put the files from the i386 directory on the FTP
> server.  If you've put them in C:\obsd31\i386 you'd specify
> obsd31/i386 here.  

> Only those files need to be installed by the install program.  The
> other files like src.tar.gz, srcsys.tar.gz, ports.tar.gz etc. that are
> outside the i386 directory you can just gunzip and untar where they
> belong after the installation's over and you're up and running.  There
> are some inconsistencies here that can cause a mess if you're not
> careful though:  the ports.tar.gz will unpack a ports directory with
> all the files inside it, and srcsys.tar.gz will unpack a sys
> directory, but src.tar.gz should be put into the src directory first
> because untarring it spews out a whole bunch of stuff.  Ports should
> end up as /usr/ports, src should be /usr/src, and then inside that
> untar sys to make /usr/src/sys.

> If it's going into a machine that doesn't have any msdos partitions I
> use the same approach, but I use an old spare hard drive connected
> temporarily.  You only need about 130 megs for the i386 directory, so
> I connect it to one machine to load it, then connect to the machine
> I'm installing on.  I just finished doing that with 3.1 today.

> Alan Corey

> On Sun, 09 Jun 2002 01:59:25 +0100, Garry Heaton

>>I live in the UK, on a very limited budget as a single parent so I was
>>pleased to find a reference to the OpenBSD site where, I was told, I
>>could download a secure UNIX for free. I followed the directions on the
>>OpenBSD site for FTP downloads and duly copied the contents of 3.1/i386
>>to a Windows directory which took about 9 hours on my dial-up
>>connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
>>new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
>>"Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
>>though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

>>What does this mean? What's the difference? Is the CD I created useless?

>>I don't have 31 to buy the CDs, nor do I have the patience to wait for
>>delivery from the USA. I appreciate the developers need contributions
>>but if the site says it's free then it should mean what it says.

>>Regards

>>Garry Heaton

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Garry Heato » Wed, 12 Jun 2002 10:33:41


'Looks like I'm outta luck.

I created a boot floppy and loaded the 3.1/i386 files onto the C:\
drive of a small Win98 partition at the beginning of the disk but
the only free space on the 20Gb disk is the last 7Gb. When I read
the installation guide on the OpenBSD website I learned that the
OpenBSD root partition must be placed within the first 8Gb of the
disk.

So, no cigar.

Garry


> I see you've gotten lots of answers about installing from CD, but I
> don't bother.  I just put the files in a directory with a short path
> name I can remember, in an msdos partition on the same machine, and
> install from that using the "install from disk" option and a boot
> floppy.

> It will ask for the drive the files are on, in wd0 or wd1 form, so you
> have to know which physical drive it's on.  Then it asks for the (dos)
> partition, which will usually be I.  Next it asks for the file system
> type, and choosing "default" here sometimes works better than
> specifying msdos.  When it asks for the directory where the files are,
> specify where you put the files from the i386 directory on the FTP
> server.  If you've put them in C:\obsd31\i386 you'd specify
> obsd31/i386 here.  

> Only those files need to be installed by the install program.  The
> other files like src.tar.gz, srcsys.tar.gz, ports.tar.gz etc. that are
> outside the i386 directory you can just gunzip and untar where they
> belong after the installation's over and you're up and running.  There
> are some inconsistencies here that can cause a mess if you're not
> careful though:  the ports.tar.gz will unpack a ports directory with
> all the files inside it, and srcsys.tar.gz will unpack a sys
> directory, but src.tar.gz should be put into the src directory first
> because untarring it spews out a whole bunch of stuff.  Ports should
> end up as /usr/ports, src should be /usr/src, and then inside that
> untar sys to make /usr/src/sys.

> If it's going into a machine that doesn't have any msdos partitions I
> use the same approach, but I use an old spare hard drive connected
> temporarily.  You only need about 130 megs for the i386 directory, so
> I connect it to one machine to load it, then connect to the machine
> I'm installing on.  I just finished doing that with 3.1 today.

> Alan Corey

> On Sun, 09 Jun 2002 01:59:25 +0100, Garry Heaton

>>I live in the UK, on a very limited budget as a single parent so I was
>>pleased to find a reference to the OpenBSD site where, I was told, I
>>could download a secure UNIX for free. I followed the directions on the
>>OpenBSD site for FTP downloads and duly copied the contents of 3.1/i386
>>to a Windows directory which took about 9 hours on my dial-up
>>connection. When it was completed I burned a CD ready to install on a
>>new partition and checked the site for installation instructions. Under
>>"Installation" I then discovered that I cannot create an 'ISO' image
>>though I can 'grab OpenBSD and create a CD'.

>>What does this mean? What's the difference? Is the CD I created useless?

>>I don't have 31 to buy the CDs, nor do I have the patience to wait for
>>delivery from the USA. I appreciate the developers need contributions
>>but if the site says it's free then it should mean what it says.

>>Regards

>>Garry Heaton

 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Alfred Breu » Wed, 12 Jun 2002 13:27:32


On Tue, 11 Jun 2002 02:33:41 +0100, Garry Heaton


>I created a boot floppy and loaded the 3.1/i386 files onto the C:\
>drive of a small Win98 partition at the beginning of the disk but
>the only free space on the 20Gb disk is the last 7Gb. When I read
>the installation guide on the OpenBSD website I learned that the
>OpenBSD root partition must be placed within the first 8Gb of the
>disk.

You may either want to look for a boot manager, which you'd need with
win9* anway, and re-partition the box's harddrive. Or you have a
closer look at FreeBSD, which comes with a boot manager and, most
probabbly, will install in those last 7 GB.
 
 
 

OpenBSD free ???

Post by Alan Core » Wed, 12 Jun 2002 13:23:25




>On Tue, 11 Jun 2002 02:33:41 +0100, Garry Heaton

>>I created a boot floppy and loaded the 3.1/i386 files onto the C:\
>>drive of a small Win98 partition at the beginning of the disk but
>>the only free space on the 20Gb disk is the last 7Gb. When I read
>>the installation guide on the OpenBSD website I learned that the
>>OpenBSD root partition must be placed within the first 8Gb of the
>>disk.

>You may either want to look for a boot manager, which you'd need with
>win9* anway, and re-partition the box's harddrive. Or you have a
>closer look at FreeBSD, which comes with a boot manager and, most
>probabbly, will install in those last 7 GB.

I used FreeBSD for a few years (still do) and I remember it being very
specific about the / partition being at cylinder 1023 or less.  Maybe
it's changed.

Have you considered adding a second hard drive?  Even something old
and small (and probably free) like 200 megs.  Put the / partition on
the small drive and everything else in the last 7 gigs of the main
drive.  

You do need to be careful that everything possible ends up on the big
drive though.  There are normally a bunch of directories off the root:
altroot, bin, dev, etc, home, root, sbin, stand, tmp. usr, var and you
need to set these up on the big drive by making partitions and mount
points with those names.  Also your swap partition.

FreeBSD's boot manager is some sort of adaptation of a program called
booteasy, which is also in the tools directory on the OpenBSD site.
Configuration is automatic and unchangeable even if you want to.  Your
Win98 partition will show up as DOS and your second drive will show up
as something like Drive 2.  I like the NT boot loader better, so if
you've also got Windows 2000, NT 4 or (probably) XP Pro on the machine
you should be able to just add the OpenBSD partition/drive to it.  I'm
in Windows 2000 now, but I've also got FreeBSD, Linux and Win95 on
here (3 hard drives) all selectable witth the NT bootloader of Windows
2000.

 
 
 

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