RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by DMS » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 13:12:31



I'm having a heck of a time getting RH 5.1, Win98SE and Mandrake 8.1 setup
on a Pentium III.

I need RH 5.1 to run a legacy app. (ESPS Waves), mandrake 8.1 to burn the
data output from 5.1 to CD and windoze for misc reasons.

I have a new WD ATA100 40 gb drive to accomodate it all, but am having a
heck of a time getting the FATS, /boot, LBA settings, and whatever else is
required correctly setup so that 5.1 can see hopefully at least 10 gigs of
the drive (it's intended partition size) when I try to set it up/partition
for it.  Windoze and Mandrake can accomodate any of the modern tech stuff
but I can see 5.1 is picky

I am setting everything up from scratch and so can do anything but several
time consuming attempts have failed.  I have been reading up on the issues
but haven't quite wrapped my mind around them.  The Pentium III's bios says
the 40021 MB drive has 16 sectors, LBA mode enabled, Transfer mode=FPIO 4 /
DMA 2 and Ultra DMA= 2.  I don't believe the PIII has anything special
(ATA66 or ATA110) in terms of controllers just probably ATA33.  The BIOS
doesn't want to let me change those settings for some reason.

Can anyone tell me where I am going wrong / what I need to do exactly to set
5.1 up or where to find the info:

I am currently puzzling over the significance of the following two
statements I ran across:

"Ultra DMA support in the Linux kernel is rather limited in kernels before
2.0.34 (I'm not sure what kernel 5.1 is... )  For some motherboards it works
well, and others not at all. When interfacing Ultra DMA drives with these
motherboards, you may need to set the BIOS to use PIO mode 2 versus PIO mode
4 transfers."

  "Caution:
  If your hard drive is more than 1024 cylinders, you must create a /boot
partition if you want the / (root) partition to use all of the remaining
space on your hard drive."

 
 
 

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by DMS » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 17:17:30


Quote:> > "Ultra DMA support in the Linux kernel is rather limited in kernels
> > before 2.0.34 (I'm not sure what kernel 5.1 is... )  For some
> > motherboards it works well, and others not at all. When interfacing
> > Ultra DMA drives with these motherboards, you may need to set the BIOS
> > to use PIO mode 2 versus PIO mode 4 transfers."

> It means just what it says.  If you're using UDMA transfer then it may or
> may not work with some motherboards.  I don't see what's difficult to
> understand about this part.

I can't tell from that statement what it's saying ... "these" motherboards
refers to what ... the ones "it works well with" or the "not at all ones"?
And how do I know which one I've got?  (I don't know if my problems are
hardware related or because of my own ignorance about how to set up my
particular combination of hardware.  I know I have an ATA100 very modern
drive which support everything.  As far as the MB or bios or controllers I
am not sure.  I'm guessing my Dell XPS T450 PIII has ATA 33 (or possibly 66)
controllers.  I thought my kernel is 2.0.34 although someone said it should
be 2.035.1 ... in any case it is not below the barrier spoken of above.

Quote:> >   "Caution:
> >   If your hard drive is more than 1024 cylinders, you must create a
> >   /boot
> > partition if you want the / (root) partition to use all of the remaining
> > space on your hard drive."

> If your hard drive is more than 1024 cylinders then you have two choices.
>  If you slam everything into the / partition, then your / partition can
> be only the size of the first 1024 cylinders on your hard drive.  To get
> around this, make a /boot partition (for the boot files, of course) and
> then your / partition can go over the 1024 cylinder limit.  This is
> actually a limitation of older versions of Lilo, as I recall.

I am going to be putting on the machine two versions of Linux (RH 5.1 to run
a legacy app. and Mandrake 8.1 to run a cd-burner) and windoze 98 SE for
misc.  So I'll have an older AND newer Lilo available.  Not sure which I
should use ...? I would think the newer but maybe 5.1 won't be able to
relate to it....?

In order to cover some of the bases I have read about, the things I think I
AM going to try tomorrow are:

Turn off LBA in my bios, Reinstall on the 40 gig (Primary Master) windows
(FAT16) first and mandrake 8.1 second ... putting a "/boot", /(root) and
120mb swap partitions in as I do. And then install RH 5.1 on a seperate
ATA33 10gig drive on the Secondary Master controller.  Do these concepts
seem appropriate ???

Quote:> Incidentally, would you mind not cross-posting all of your questions?
> It's considered a bit "rude" when asking in one newsgroup will do and get
> you the answers you seek.

I have never understood that.  Cross posting off-topic stuff ... SPAM, I do
see as attrociously RUDE but picking 2 or 3 groups pertinent to your quest,
is more likely to get you a savvy response and also publishes the savvy
responses to more people. The very power of newsgroups is the numbers of
appropriate people they reach, so as long as your group's subject are
pertinent to the question, cross posting seems exactly appropriate to my way
of thinking.  And on these difficult questions, the answers come none too
quickly ... I have been posting about my 5.1 partition problems for some
days now and have yet to get to the bottom of the issues.

But never-the-less, I'm sorry that I have offended you.

 
 
 

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by Baard Ove Kopper » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 20:10:00



>   "Caution:
>   If your hard drive is more than 1024 cylinders, you must create a /boot
> partition if you want the / (root) partition to use all of the remaining
> space on your hard drive."

I *think* this is supposed to be an _old_ limit, but
some installers (including RedHat) still refuses to
install the boot-sector if it isn't within this limit.

This is how I did it (It assumes you're starting from
scratch, with *nothing* of importance on your drive).

-First you have to make/have a Windows boot-floppy,
 I'll tell you why later.

-Boot linux from floppy or CD-ROM I've found the
 Slackware Boot/Rescue floppy *very* useful for this.

-Start fdisk or cfdisk.  If you get an error about not
 being able to read partition information, use
 dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/<your disk> bs=1024 count=1000
 to overwrite MasteBootRecord.  Then reboot.

-Set up a primary linux partition in the beginning of
 your drive.  If you intend to have the rest of linux
 later on the disk, and *only* have the kernel here
 you don't need more than aprox. 128MB.  This will
 later become /boot.  If you want / (the root) here,
 you need more space.  If you want to use only *one*
 partition, you need *lots* of space -- but it *should*
 be less than 1024 cylinders due to the limit.  I
 suggest setting-up this space for /boot only.

-Set up a primary Windows partition.  Choose Win95 LBA
 32bits as type.  Set it as bootable.

-Set up other Linux and/or Windows partitions.  Other
 Windows partitions should be of type Win95 32bit (but
 *not* LBA -- unless I've got it backwards, and it
 should be the other way around).  If you want more
 than two other partition, make one of them an extended
 partition and make logical partitions in this one.

-Write your new partiton table to disk.

-Use mke2fs to create file-systems on all the *linux*
 partition (though not any swap-partition).

-Reboot, with the Windows-floppy inserted.

-Windows won't recognize your MasterBootRecord, so use
 the undocumented feature fdisk /mbr to write the
 MBR as Windows wants it.

-Use format c: to format your primarily Windows-drive.

-Reboot with Windows CD, install Windows.

-Reboot and test Windows.

-Reboot with RedHat CD, install Windows.

-Set up LILO to optionally boot Windows.

You *may* not be able to format in Windows.  If not,
install a minimal Linux *with* mkdosfs.  Use mkdosfs
to format the Windows-partition.  Make sure you format
in 32bit FAT (it's an option) (check the mkdosfs
documentation or use the --help option).

Continue with using Windows-fdisk with the /mbr option.
Install Windows... Install Linux *once more*.

Hope this help.

-Koppe

 
 
 

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by DMS » Thu, 25 Apr 2002 06:07:55


Thanks for your directions ... they are a little over my head though. They
assume I know more than I do.  One question, I have is: for one windows
partition, why do you have to install windows so many times ... with both
the windows CD and Linux CD?  I don't see how that would work...

Isn't it possible that I start the process with windows so that I don't have
to get into the MBR stuff etc and use the more of the user friendly install
processes and included Linux partition tools?  Besides the general purpose
10 gig windows partition, I am planning on installing a 10gig RH 5.1
partition to run the legacy app, and a 10 gig Mandrake 8.1 to run the CD
burner for the data output.

I wonder if doing win98, RH 5.1 and Mandrake 8.1 in that order with the
appropriate choices makes some sense?  (Maybe I need to get a /boot on there
when I get to the 1st linux install?

I'm guessing that LBA should be off in my BIOS because it is an newer tool
that is not absolutely necessary I think.  Not sure what I should do when
the window install asks about it ... if I say no ... it probably won't see
all of the drive ... maybe ...

Any no-no's in this kind of scheme approach?

Quote:> >   "Caution:
> >   If your hard drive is more than 1024 cylinders, you must create a
/boot
> > partition if you want the / (root) partition to use all of the remaining
> > space on your hard drive."

> I *think* this is supposed to be an _old_ limit, but
> some installers (including RedHat) still refuses to
> install the boot-sector if it isn't within this limit.

> This is how I did it (It assumes you're starting from
> scratch, with *nothing* of importance on your drive).

> -First you have to make/have a Windows boot-floppy,
>  I'll tell you why later.

> -Boot linux from floppy or CD-ROM I've found the
>  Slackware Boot/Rescue floppy *very* useful for this.

> -Start fdisk or cfdisk.  If you get an error about not
>  being able to read partition information, use
>  dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/<your disk> bs=1024 count=1000
>  to overwrite MasteBootRecord.  Then reboot.

> -Set up a primary linux partition in the beginning of
>  your drive.  If you intend to have the rest of linux
>  later on the disk, and *only* have the kernel here
>  you don't need more than aprox. 128MB.  This will
>  later become /boot.  If you want / (the root) here,
>  you need more space.  If you want to use only *one*
>  partition, you need *lots* of space -- but it *should*
>  be less than 1024 cylinders due to the limit.  I
>  suggest setting-up this space for /boot only.

> -Set up a primary Windows partition.  Choose Win95 LBA
>  32bits as type.  Set it as bootable.

> -Set up other Linux and/or Windows partitions.  Other
>  Windows partitions should be of type Win95 32bit (but
>  *not* LBA -- unless I've got it backwards, and it
>  should be the other way around).  If you want more
>  than two other partition, make one of them an extended
>  partition and make logical partitions in this one.

> -Write your new partiton table to disk.

> -Use mke2fs to create file-systems on all the *linux*
>  partition (though not any swap-partition).

> -Reboot, with the Windows-floppy inserted.

> -Windows won't recognize your MasterBootRecord, so use
>  the undocumented feature fdisk /mbr to write the
>  MBR as Windows wants it.

> -Use format c: to format your primarily Windows-drive.

> -Reboot with Windows CD, install Windows.

> -Reboot and test Windows.

> -Reboot with RedHat CD, install Windows.

> -Set up LILO to optionally boot Windows.

> You *may* not be able to format in Windows.  If not,
> install a minimal Linux *with* mkdosfs.  Use mkdosfs
> to format the Windows-partition.  Make sure you format
> in 32bit FAT (it's an option) (check the mkdosfs
> documentation or use the --help option).

> Continue with using Windows-fdisk with the /mbr option.
> Install Windows... Install Linux *once more*.

> Hope this help.

> -Koppe

 
 
 

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by Baard Ove Kopper » Thu, 25 Apr 2002 18:25:00


I'm not saying this is the only way, but it worked
for me, and believe me I tried several other
approaches first... :-)


> Thanks for your directions ... they are a little over my head though. They
> assume I know more than I do.  One question, I have is: for one windows
> partition, why do you have to install windows so many times ... with both
> the windows CD and Linux CD?  I don't see how that would work...

You don't install Windows the first time around
(under Linux), you just reserve some space for it.  

Ideally you should use Windows-Fdisk to make the
Windows partitions, rather than Linux-Fdisk, but
Windows-Fdisk is *very* stubborn.

Windows-Fdisk won't let you make more than *one*
primary-partition, and (I think) only at the
*beginning* (first) of your disk -- and Windows
demands to be placed on *that* primary-partition...
Windows-Fdisk also demands that any other partitions
are *logical-partitions* on an extended-partition
(rather than a primary).

That won't do for you, you *need* at least *two*
primary-partition -- one for /boot (or /) and one
for Windows.  And you want Windows to be second,
not the first on your disk.  If you use Windows-Fdisk,
you'll either end up not being able to install
Linux (due to the cylinder-limit) or having a
rediculous little Window-partition in the
beginning of your disk.

An additional problem is that the two fdisk/OS
doesn't understand each other fully.  Linux may
not be able to read a MBR edited by Windows-Fidsk,
and Windows demands that you reinstall the Windows-
style MBR with Windows-Fdisk (the /mbr switch) --
fortunately this will only reinstall the Windows
boot-manager, and *not* update the MBR in any other
way... Linux will therefor *still* be able to
read the MBR (it may not have been able to, if you'd
used the Windows-Fdisk to actually decide the sizes
of your partitions).

The reason why you *may* have to format your Windows
partitions in Linux, is that Windows may not recognize
them (the partitions) as Windows-partitions if they're
not formatted in FAT (Windows-format) -- and thus may
then refuse to format the partitions under Windows
otherwise.

Quote:> Isn't it possible that I start the process with windows so that I don't have
> to get into the MBR stuff etc and use the more of the user friendly install
> processes and included Linux partition tools?  Besides the general purpose
> 10 gig windows partition, I am planning on installing a 10gig RH 5.1
> partition to run the legacy app, and a 10 gig Mandrake 8.1 to run the CD
> burner for the data output.

The difficulty lays in the Win-Fdisk lack of flexibility,
and linux problems with reading a MBR edited with Win-Fdisk
-- and the need to have /boot (or / ) within that cylinder
limit.

I guess if you had a program like PartitionMagic (comercal
Windows software) that you could easely set up the partitions
as you'd like.

Quote:> I wonder if doing win98, RH 5.1 and Mandrake 8.1 in that order with the
> appropriate choices makes some sense?  (Maybe I need to get a /boot on there
> when I get to the 1st linux install?

You should install Windows first.  I've also heard that
Mandrake had a very good system for set up it's
boot-manager to boot Windows _and any previously
installed Linux_, so I gues RedHat second and
Mandrake last.

I suggest you make *most* of your Linux-partitions
(except /boot) as *logical*-partitions (in an
extended-partition).

The swap-partition can be shared between the two
distributions.

The area for home-directories (/home) should be
split-off from root (/), and be put in a partition
of it's own.  This partition can be shared between
the distros.  Also /root (the superusers home
directories) can be split-off and put in a partition
of it's own.  You may also want to split of /var/mail
to be able to share mail-boxes between distros.

You'll need one root-directory (/) for each distro
in a partition of it's own.  If you choose to
split-off (/usr) and/or (/var), you need one partition
for each of them for each distro (4 if you split-off
both).

I'm a bit uncertain in regards to /boot.  It probably
would be a good idea to have one for each distro
(so you disk would look like this:
|/boot(redhat)|/boot(mandrake)|Windows|Extended-partition
(everything else)|

You may however be able to use just one /boot-partition.
I would think though, that you would then need to
separate kernels -- one for each distro (e.g. linux-rh,
linux-mdk).  The problem I see with using just one /boot,
is that the 2nd distro would overwrite whatever the 1st
installed, so you'd have to reinstall the 1st one (after
cahnging names on the 2nd).

Quote:> I'm guessing that LBA should be off in my BIOS because it is an newer tool
> that is not absolutely necessary I think.  Not sure what I should do when
> the window install asks about it ... if I say no ... it probably won't see
> all of the drive ... maybe ...

I don't think so.  But then, I'm *no* expert.

Good Luck.
-Koppe

 
 
 

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by DMS » Fri, 26 Apr 2002 07:11:03


Oy!  My head is spinning.  I am studying your tips so that hopefully I can
recreate them ...

Another question... if I was willing to use a custom boot disk whenever
using RH 5.1, would that simplify the install/setup/fdisk/format labryinth
any?  Maybe I could do the same for the Mandrake 8.1 that is going to run
the CDRW when necessary...?  Would the /boot partition be necessary then?

As you can see, I am struggling to wrap my brain around the
variables/principles/techniques that are involved here... I need to keep the
process as simple as possible for my ignorant self!  The KISS principle!  I
appreciate your help.

The last parts of your first explanation confuse me:

Quote:>-Write your new partiton table to disk.
>-Use mke2fs to create file-systems on all the *linux*
> partition (though not any swap-partition).
> -Reboot, with the Windows-floppy inserted.
> -Windows won't recognize your MasterBootRecord, so use
> the undocumented feature fdisk /mbr to write the

 >MBR as Windows wants it.

JUST FDISK /MBR AT THE C:\  ?

Quote:> -Use format c: to format your primarily Windows-drive.
> -Reboot with Windows CD, install Windows.
> -Reboot and test Windows.
> -Reboot with RedHat CD, install Windows.

I AM ASSUMING, AS THE PREVIOUS PERSON MENTIONED,
THIS IS A TYPO ... YOU MEANT RH 5.1...?

Quote:> -Set up LILO to optionally boot Windows.
>You *may* not be able to format in Windows.  If not,

WHAT DO YOU MEAN ... IF I *MAY* NOT BE ABLE TO FORMAT IN WINDOWS?   FORMAT
FLOPPY DISKS?

Quote:>install a minimal Linux *with* mkdosfs.  Use mkdosfs
>to format the Windows-partition.  Make sure you format
>in 32bit FAT (it's an option) (check the mkdosfs
>documentation or use the --help option).

I THOUGHT I ALREADY INSTALLED RH 5.1 ABOVE ...?

Quote:>Continue with using Windows-fdisk with the /mbr option.
>Install Windows... Install Linux *once more*.

INSTALL WINDOWS AGAIN AND LINUX ...   ??

IF YOU HAVE ANY PATIENCE LEFT, I'D APPRECIATE YOUR
EXPLAINING THE ABOVE A BIT MORE.  THANKS AGAIN.

DAN

----- Original Message -----

Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.redhat,linux.redhat.install,linux.redhat.misc
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2002 2:25 AM
Subject: Re: RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

> I'm not saying this is the only way, but it worked
> for me, and believe me I tried several other
> approaches first... :-)



> > Thanks for your directions ... they are a little over my head though.
They
> > assume I know more than I do.  One question, I have is: for one windows
> > partition, why do you have to install windows so many times ... with
both
> > the windows CD and Linux CD?  I don't see how that would work...

> You don't install Windows the first time around
> (under Linux), you just reserve some space for it.

> Ideally you should use Windows-Fdisk to make the
> Windows partitions, rather than Linux-Fdisk, but
> Windows-Fdisk is *very* stubborn.

> Windows-Fdisk won't let you make more than *one*
> primary-partition, and (I think) only at the
> *beginning* (first) of your disk -- and Windows
> demands to be placed on *that* primary-partition...
> Windows-Fdisk also demands that any other partitions
> are *logical-partitions* on an extended-partition
> (rather than a primary).

> That won't do for you, you *need* at least *two*
> primary-partition -- one for /boot (or /) and one
> for Windows.  And you want Windows to be second,
> not the first on your disk.  If you use Windows-Fdisk,
> you'll either end up not being able to install
> Linux (due to the cylinder-limit) or having a
> rediculous little Window-partition in the
> beginning of your disk.

> An additional problem is that the two fdisk/OS
> doesn't understand each other fully.  Linux may
> not be able to read a MBR edited by Windows-Fidsk,
> and Windows demands that you reinstall the Windows-
> style MBR with Windows-Fdisk (the /mbr switch) --
> fortunately this will only reinstall the Windows
> boot-manager, and *not* update the MBR in any other
> way... Linux will therefor *still* be able to
> read the MBR (it may not have been able to, if you'd
> used the Windows-Fdisk to actually decide the sizes
> of your partitions).

> The reason why you *may* have to format your Windows
> partitions in Linux, is that Windows may not recognize
> them (the partitions) as Windows-partitions if they're
> not formatted in FAT (Windows-format) -- and thus may
> then refuse to format the partitions under Windows
> otherwise.

> > Isn't it possible that I start the process with windows so that I don't
have
> > to get into the MBR stuff etc and use the more of the user friendly
install
> > processes and included Linux partition tools?  Besides the general
purpose
> > 10 gig windows partition, I am planning on installing a 10gig RH 5.1
> > partition to run the legacy app, and a 10 gig Mandrake 8.1 to run the CD
> > burner for the data output.

> The difficulty lays in the Win-Fdisk lack of flexibility,
> and linux problems with reading a MBR edited with Win-Fdisk
> -- and the need to have /boot (or / ) within that cylinder
> limit.

> I guess if you had a program like PartitionMagic (comercal
> Windows software) that you could easely set up the partitions
> as you'd like.

> > I wonder if doing win98, RH 5.1 and Mandrake 8.1 in that order with the
> > appropriate choices makes some sense?  (Maybe I need to get a /boot on
there
> > when I get to the 1st linux install?

> You should install Windows first.  I've also heard that
> Mandrake had a very good system for set up it's
> boot-manager to boot Windows _and any previously
> installed Linux_, so I gues RedHat second and
> Mandrake last.

> I suggest you make *most* of your Linux-partitions
> (except /boot) as *logical*-partitions (in an
> extended-partition).

> The swap-partition can be shared between the two
> distributions.

> The area for home-directories (/home) should be
> split-off from root (/), and be put in a partition
> of it's own.  This partition can be shared between
> the distros.  Also /root (the superusers home
> directories) can be split-off and put in a partition
> of it's own.  You may also want to split of /var/mail
> to be able to share mail-boxes between distros.

> You'll need one root-directory (/) for each distro
> in a partition of it's own.  If you choose to
> split-off (/usr) and/or (/var), you need one partition
> for each of them for each distro (4 if you split-off
> both).

> I'm a bit uncertain in regards to /boot.  It probably
> would be a good idea to have one for each distro
> (so you disk would look like this:
> |/boot(redhat)|/boot(mandrake)|Windows|Extended-partition
> (everything else)|

> You may however be able to use just one /boot-partition.
> I would think though, that you would then need to
> separate kernels -- one for each distro (e.g. linux-rh,
> linux-mdk).  The problem I see with using just one /boot,
> is that the 2nd distro would overwrite whatever the 1st
> installed, so you'd have to reinstall the 1st one (after
> cahnging names on the 2nd).

> > I'm guessing that LBA should be off in my BIOS because it is an newer
tool
> > that is not absolutely necessary I think.  Not sure what I should do
when
> > the window install asks about it ... if I say no ... it probably won't
see
> > all of the drive ... maybe ...

> I don't think so.  But then, I'm *no* expert.

> Good Luck.
> -Koppe

 
 
 

RH 5.1 partitions, FAT16/32, LBA, 40 GB, /boot etc??

Post by Baard Ove Kopper » Fri, 26 Apr 2002 18:50:21



> Another question... if I was willing to use a custom boot disk whenever
> using RH 5.1, would that simplify the install/setup/fdisk/format labryinth
> any?  Maybe I could do the same for the Mandrake 8.1 that is going to run
> the CDRW when necessary...?  Would the /boot partition be necessary then?

I must admit I've never tried that...

You would have the kernel itself on the
floppy, but you may need things like modules
stored on your hard-drive.  I'm not sure
if the cylinder-limit is *just* for the
kernel or for modules too.

I would *think* you didn't need a /boot
any longer, and would put the modules
and stuff directly under / (the root).

The problem is that the installation-program
don't know that you intend to make a boot-floppy,
and may therefor refuse to continue once
you specify a root-partition (/) that lays
outside the cylinder-limit.

If you're gonna start linux from floppy, I
guess you should run "fdisk /mbr" once more
after installing Linux -- to make sure the
MBR will start Windows.

Quote:> > -Windows won't recognize your MasterBootRecord, so use
> > the undocumented feature fdisk /mbr to write the
>  >MBR as Windows wants it.

> JUST FDISK /MBR AT THE C:\  ?

You either type "fdisk /mbr " or
"fdisk /mbr c: " at the prompt
(can't remember which).

Quote:> > -Reboot with RedHat CD, install Windows.

> I AM ASSUMING, AS THE PREVIOUS PERSON MENTIONED,
> THIS IS A TYPO ... YOU MEANT RH 5.1...?

Yep, it's a typo.  Here you install Linux.

===

Quote:> >You *may* not be able to format in Windows.  If not,

> WHAT DO YOU MEAN ... IF I *MAY* NOT BE ABLE TO FORMAT IN WINDOWS?   FORMAT
> FLOPPY DISKS?

No, your Windows-partition(s) on your HardDrive.

The OS is *supposed* to look in the MBR for which
type of OS the partition "belongs" to.

Unfortunately, Windows "works" in mysterious ways,
and may not look at this information at all.  In it's
infinite wisdom, Windows instead tries to recognize
the format (the filesystem) on the partition itself.  

If Windows can't recognize the format, it may ignore
the partition completely, and refuse to do any operations
on that partition -- *including* formatting it (with
"format c:").  

Therefor you *may* have to format it in FAT (Windows
format) with Linux first (which is less picky)... but
then you probably must install the necessary pieces
of Linux first (as you're unlikely to find a Linux
rescue/install floppy/CD with programs to format a
Windows-partition).

Quote:> >install a minimal Linux *with* mkdosfs.  Use mkdosfs
> >to format the Windows-partition.  Make sure you format
> >in 32bit FAT (it's an option) (check the mkdosfs
> >documentation or use the --help option).

> I THOUGHT I ALREADY INSTALLED RH 5.1 ABOVE ...?

> >Continue with using Windows-fdisk with the /mbr option.
> >Install Windows... Install Linux *once more*.

> INSTALL WINDOWS AGAIN AND LINUX ...   ??

This whole thing about formatting Windows, is
what you should do if you *fail* to format c:
from Windows, after you've created the partitions,
but *before* installing both Windows and Linux.

It's an *exception*, and I probably shouldn't
have placed it at the end, but between the point
"Use format c:" and "Reboot with Windows CD"...
it's just what to do if Windows refuses to format
your C-drive after starting it with the
Windows-rescue floppy. At this point, neither
Windows nor Linux are installed, though room
has been reserved on your drive.

You must install Windows *before* Linux, but if
Windows refuses to format the partition(s) it
should later use, you must install Linux *temporarly*
to take care of this problem (format FAT under Linux).

Ideally, you should use a Linux rescue floppy/CD
(so you *didn't* have to install Linux twice), but
I doubt you'll find one with programs for formatting
a Windows partition.

===
Short run through:
1) Boot with Linux rescue/install floppy/CD
2) Use Linux-fdisk to set-up partitions
   Make sure the kernel resides inside the
   cylinder-limit -- either "/" or "/boot"
   Set the Windows-partition as bootable
   (from Linux rescue/install floppy/CD)
3) Create filesystems on Linux-partitions
   (from Linux rescue/install floppy/CD)
4) Reboot with Windows rescue-floppy
5) "fdisk /mbr" (Windows-Fdisk) to reinstall
   the Windows boot-loader
   (from Windows rescue/install floppy/CD)
6) "format c:" to make a Windows-partition
*) If it fails, you must format the Windows-
   partition in FAT32 with Linux.  If you have
   to that, you must install the necessary
   parts of Linux at this point.  You will
   later install Linux *again*.
7) Reboot with the Windows install CD
8) Install Windows
9) Reboot with the Linux Install CD
10)Install Linux
11)Set up LILO to boot both Linux and Windows

-Koppe

-Koppe