Virus Protection?

Virus Protection?

Post by Burns MacDonal » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00



What are most of you using for virus scanners?

--
Burns

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Sid » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00


AVP
http://www.avp.ch



Quote:> What are most of you using for virus scanners?

> --
> Burns


 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Richard Stein » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00



spake unto us, saying:

Quote:>What are most of you using for virus scanners?

Viruses are not (yet) a problem on most Unix flavors, including Linux.

I have changed my BIOS settings on my *nix boxes to disallow booting
from floppies (which helps defang viruses living in the boot sectors of
floppies accidentally left in the floppy drive), but other than that I
do little else.

I am somewhat more careful about trojans -- I obtain all software from
"trusted" file sources), I make sure that I'm not the first to download
something (letting other people find the serious problems first <grin>),
and I manually inspect install scripts and the like before I kick them
off.  Common sense, really.

--

     OS/2 + Linux + BeOS + FreeBSD + Solaris + WinNT4 + Win95 + DOS
      + VMWare + Fusion + vMac + Executor = PC Hobbyist Heaven! :-)
            I used to have a life...  Now I have a computer!

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by DanH » Wed, 20 Oct 1999 04:00:00



> What are most of you using for virus scanners?

I don't log on as root, I use programs as the user and not root, I do
not install a program that I have not run as a user.

There are two viruses for Linux that I'm aware of.

Dan
--
UNIX - Not just for vestal *s anymore
Linux - Choice of a GNU generation

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Burns MacDonal » Thu, 21 Oct 1999 04:00:00



> AVP
> http://www.avp.ch



> > What are most of you using for virus scanners?

> > --
> > Burns

Thanks for that, although I see that the full anti-virus application is
not yet available for Linux (online at least).

--
Burns

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Peter Tod » Thu, 21 Oct 1999 04:00:00




> > What are most of you using for virus scanners?

> I don't log on as root, I use programs as the user and not root, I do
> not install a program that I have not run as a user.

> There are two viruses for Linux that I'm aware of.

Both of which are not in the wild.

*However* it's very easy to write a Linux
virus. I wrote a quick one with a batch script
to see what (if any) problems I'd run into. I
ran into none and finished the thing in 10
minutes.

I see no reason why Linux should be any less
susceptible to virus attacks then any other OS.

While a single virus infecting a single user is
unlikely to distroy the data of all users (assuming
the virus doesn't exploit security holes) it can
easily distroy everything a single user has write
access to.

Lets just hope the script kiddie trash doesn't
decide to write a few Linux viruses.

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Bruno Wolff I » Fri, 22 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:> I see no reason why Linux should be any less
> susceptible to virus attacks then any other OS.

Because most people don't use viewers that can execute arbitrary code from
whatever is being viewed.

There have been some bugs in MIME handling and with some viewers, but the
design of the system is intended to be safe. This is a lot different than
with Microsoft products, where the system where viewers are often allowed
to execute arbitrary code by default.

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Burns MacDonal » Sat, 23 Oct 1999 04:00:00



> > I see no reason why Linux should be any less
> > susceptible to virus attacks then any other OS.

> Because most people don't use viewers that can execute arbitrary code from
> whatever is being viewed.

> There have been some bugs in MIME handling and with some viewers, but the
> design of the system is intended to be safe. This is a lot different than
> with Microsoft products, where the system where viewers are often allowed
> to execute arbitrary code by default.

I think this argument represents a pretty narrow view of the scope of
the virus problem. A virus can be written to exploit any binary-based
system. And they are not soley confined to, nor only spread through, the
exploitation of viewer hosts.

People are cracking Linux boxes all the time through the internet. The

serious at present. It wouldn't be much of a step from probing, cracking
and leaving a sniffer, to leaving a malicious self-replicating piece of
code instead. As Linux continues to gain in popularity as a desktop
operating system, I think it is inevitable that we will see the
implementation of Linux-targetted viral code in the wild. Once this
occurs, the open source concept and broad proliferation of shared
executables will make Linux particularly vulnerable. However, the
operating system structure is indeed different and that will force some
changes in how viruses are written and transmitted.

--
Burns

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Bill » Sat, 23 Oct 1999 04:00:00


On Tue, 19 Oct 1999 10:17:23 GMT, Burns MacDonald

Quote:>What are most of you using for virus scanners?

Norton AV for Windows, common sense for Linux.

--
Bill "Houdini" Weiss
PGP key: http://home.att.net/~bill_weiss/bill_weiss.asc
ICQ#: 43270740

--
Haiku Error Message:  
Errors have occurred.
We won't tell you where or why.
Lazy programmers.

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by Peter Tod » Sun, 24 Oct 1999 04:00:00




> > > I see no reason why Linux should be any less
> > > susceptible to virus attacks then any other OS.

> > Because most people don't use viewers that can execute arbitrary code from
> > whatever is being viewed.

> > There have been some bugs in MIME handling and with some viewers, but the
> > design of the system is intended to be safe. This is a lot different than
> > with Microsoft products, where the system where viewers are often allowed
> > to execute arbitrary code by default.

> I think this argument represents a pretty narrow view of the scope of
> the virus problem. A virus can be written to exploit any binary-based
> system. And they are not soley confined to, nor only spread through, the
> exploitation of viewer hosts.

> People are cracking Linux boxes all the time through the internet. The

> serious at present. It wouldn't be much of a step from probing, cracking
> and leaving a sniffer, to leaving a malicious self-replicating piece of
> code instead. As Linux continues to gain in popularity as a desktop
> operating system, I think it is inevitable that we will see the
> implementation of Linux-targetted viral code in the wild. Once this
> occurs, the open source concept and broad proliferation of shared
> executables will make Linux particularly vulnerable. However, the
> operating system structure is indeed different and that will force some
> changes in how viruses are written and transmitted.

Exactly. There is *nothing* stopping a virus attack on a Linux
machine other then the fact that nobody has thought of it before.

Linux is just as susceptible to viruses as any other OS with the
exception that a virus will only trash a single users data, not
multiple users. And even that isn't true if the virus exploits
security holes.

 
 
 

Virus Protection?

Post by dan_schra.. » Tue, 26 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Trend Micro just posted its free virus scanner for Red Hat Linux

http://www.antivirus.com/free_tools/linux/

Why would you want it?
Not to protect against linux viruses - which are still only a
threoretical problem, but because many view linux as a more stable
platform for file/email/proxy server applications.  Viruses passing
through the linux box often land on wintel machines - were the virus
threat is definately not theorectical.

Trend will soon (next week) be launching our version of InterScan for
Linux - for scanning SMTP/FTP and HTTP traffic.

Product Description
Trend FileScan for Linux protects your Linux server from viruses and
known malicious Java/Active X code. With on demand scanning and
prescheduled scanning, you can stop viruses on your network server
before they spread. FileScan for Linux allows you to run scans of files
in the directories you specify on your Linux system. When a file
containing viruses or known malicious code is detected, you will be
immediately alerted.

Product Features - free linux scanner

Scans files on your Linux system for viruses and known malicious
Java/ActiveX code
Supports on-demand and prescheduled scans
Supports on-demand and prescheduled virus pattern updates
Comprehensive logs are generated when infected files are detected
Includes easy-to-use web configuration program w/password protection

Minimum Requirements
Trend FileScan for Linux requires Red Hat Linux 6.0 or above running on
an x86 machine.

Look for our new InterScan for Linux to go live later this week for
scanning SMTP/HTTP/FTP traffic passing through your Linux box.



Quote:> What are most of you using for virus scanners?

> --
> Burns

--
Dan Schrader
Trend Micro
http://www.antivirus.com

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

1. Virus protection against WINDOWS Viruses, server releated.

Does anyone out there know of a piece of virus protection software against
Windows based viruses?
The reason I ask is that I have a lot of Windows clients plugged into my
Samba servers sharing files like Word documents and emails and would like to
perform scans at night.

Any info would be greatfully recieved.

Thankyou in advance,

James.

2. No PPP-HOWTO ;( What's the next best thing?

3. virus protection for FreeBSD?

4. Real Audio / Helix Player Plugin for Solaris 10 sparc

5. protector - 1.00.2 -- GPLed e-mail virus protection

6. ISAM Facility on Digital's Tru64Unix

7. lilo doesn't work - is Norton virus protection the prob?

8. ftp and links

9. unix virus protection for Dos

10. Virus protection for network (SuSE 9.3 server, Win2K workstations)

11. can do virus protection @ firewall/gateway?

12. Virus Protection?

13. virus protection