ppc linux on Umax Apus2000 603e/200MHz

ppc linux on Umax Apus2000 603e/200MHz

Post by Louis Sabe » Fri, 18 Jan 2002 21:53:03



Hi there,

I'm new to the world of macs, but have been using x86 linux distros for some
time now - I just have a few basic questions:

I have just acquired a mac clone (see subject line), and found it a little
slow running OS8.5. I don't particularly want to downgrade the OS, and
thought I'd give linux a go on it.

Question1: every HOWTO I've read on the subject suggests running a dual-boot
setup. Is it not possible to run linux as the sole OS on a mac?

Question2: How does the speed of linux on mac compare with linux on x86? I
know this is a bit of a silly question, but I'm curious to know whether it
will be any slower/faster than my Pentium-Pro200 RedHat server.

Question3: Is there any particular distribution I should be looking at using
(since I have a "pretend" mac)?

Question4: Does anyone have any idea how to boot from CD on my particular
model?

Many thanks.

Louis

 
 
 

ppc linux on Umax Apus2000 603e/200MHz

Post by Keith Kell » Sat, 19 Jan 2002 04:55:28




Quote:> Question1: every HOWTO I've read on the subject suggests running a dual-boot
> setup. Is it not possible to run linux as the sole OS on a mac?

It is definitely possible.  I'm guessing that you would want to look
into quik--the best place I found for info was at penguinppc.org:

http://penguinppc.org/projects/quik/

Quote:> Question2: How does the speed of linux on mac compare with linux on x86? I
> know this is a bit of a silly question, but I'm curious to know whether it
> will be any slower/faster than my Pentium-Pro200 RedHat server.

Well, I can only compare what I've used: I installed linux onto a
PowerComputing 210MHz tower with 64MB of RAM, and it compares favorably
to my old desktop, a Cyrix 333MHz with 160MB of RAM.  I definitely notice
the lack of RAM at times, but other than that it seems pretty comparable.

You should definitely be wary of comparing a desktop to a server--
hopefully you're configuring them with very different software, and so
you don't want to start comparing apples to oranges.

Quote:> Question3: Is there any particular distribution I should be looking at using
> (since I have a "pretend" mac)?

There's no difference between Macs and Mac clones with linux, I believe.

Quote:> Question4: Does anyone have any idea how to boot from CD on my particular
> model?

I ended up using a boot floppy, so no help there, sorry.  If you go that
route, first try making the floppy from MacOS--when I tried, I first used
linux-intel to make the floppy, and it didn't work three different times.
First time after using MacOS to make the disks it worked like a charm.

Some unsolicited hints:

The relationship between Open Firmware, MacOS, and linux can be...strange...
at times.  You definitely can't expect the same ease of configuring Open
Firmware (effectively a BIOS) as on intel-architecture machines.

If you want to be able to set Open Firmware settings from linux, you
need nvram support in the kernel.  Being able to set OF from linux is
pretty crucial, so make sure to compile that support in any new kernels.

Unless I'm not finding the right info, you are required to use the
framebuffer console in linux-ppc.  I think this is a consequence of the
Open Firmware, but I may be wrong.  In any case, unless you find different
info, don't compile out the framebuffer stuff in a new kernel.

--keith

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