Heap Memory

Heap Memory

Post by Paul Condinh » Sat, 22 Jun 1996 04:00:00



I am looking for any info on HEAP MEMORY on SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2. Is
there a KERNEL parameter that can be modified? If so are there any
related KERNEL parameters that also have to be modified?

I have checked all the documentation I have on SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2 and
Open Server Enterprise 5.0. The only mention of HEAP MEMORY was in
SCOHELP on 5.0 regarding the -h parameter with the nfsstat command,
and that parameter doesn't even work.

thanks in advance.
pc.

 
 
 

Heap Memory

Post by Kurt J Lan » Sat, 22 Jun 1996 04:00:00



>I am looking for any info on HEAP MEMORY on SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2. Is
>there a KERNEL parameter that can be modified? If so are there any
>related KERNEL parameters that also have to be modified?
>I have checked all the documentation I have on SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2 and
>Open Server Enterprise 5.0. The only mention of HEAP MEMORY was in
>SCOHELP on 5.0 regarding the -h parameter with the nfsstat command,
>and that parameter doesn't even work.

I am guessing you are coming from a Windoze environment.
UNIX systems don't mess with heaps. They also don't GPF.
Every program is protected from every other one. If this is
not related to your question, I don't understand your
question. Hope this helps.
--
--


 
 
 

Heap Memory

Post by Troy DeJon » Wed, 03 Jul 1996 04:00:00




: >I am looking for any info on HEAP MEMORY on SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2. Is
: >there a KERNEL parameter that can be modified? If so are there any
: >related KERNEL parameters that also have to be modified?

: >I have checked all the documentation I have on SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2 and
: >Open Server Enterprise 5.0. The only mention of HEAP MEMORY was in
: >SCOHELP on 5.0 regarding the -h parameter with the nfsstat command,
: >and that parameter doesn't even work.

: I am guessing you are coming from a Windoze environment.
: UNIX systems don't mess with heaps. They also don't GPF.
: Every program is protected from every other one. If this is
: not related to your question, I don't understand your
: question. Hope this helps.
: --
: --

UNIX systems most certainly do "mess" with heaps.  If your UNIX program
calls malloc(), then you are increasing the size of your heap, or break,
via the sbrk() system call.

UNIX programs GPF as well.  Have you even seen your program die with
a "Segmentation fault (core dumped)"?  Well, that was because the kernel
got a GPF (or one of a few other faults) and then sent your process a
SIGSEGV signal.  

I will agree, though, that I'm not clear on what type of info Paul wants.
A pretty complete understanding of the layout of a UNIX process in
memory could be gleaned from a variety of UNIX internals books.

--
Troy de Jongh           "No matter how hard you push and no matter what the
                         priority, you can't increase the speed of light."  
                         Fundamental Truth #2, RFC 1925