SCO OpenServer 5.0.0b

SCO OpenServer 5.0.0b

Post by Tom Parson » Sat, 29 Aug 1998 04:00:00




| It states in the SCO y2k white paper that all versions of SCO OpenServer 5 is
| y2k compatible.  It also states, however, that:
|
| "The 32-bit UNIX operating system design is such that in January, 2038, the
| system date information for the year will reset to December, 1901.  Currently
| there is no known solution for this problem.  however, SCO will provide a
| 64-bit UNIX operating system that, when executing on a 64-bit architecture
| processor, will not be limited in processing dates after January, 2038."
|
| My questions:
|
| 1) What happens in January, 2038, to cause this problem?  I assume its
| something to do with limitations in 32-bit calculations.

Time is kept in seconds since Jan 1 1970, but don't worry, long before
it runs out, 64 bit systems will be obsolete.

| 2) How do I know if I have a 16-bit or 32-bit OS?  Is there some way to tell
| by looking at the OS itself.  I know I can refer to white papers, and such.
| But can I tell from looking at something on the system?  I am assuming that
| OpenServer 5.0.0b is a 32-bit OS.

The last SCO 16 bit Unix/Xenix was the 286 Xenix product in the mid
1980's
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SCO OpenServer 5.0.0b

Post by Stephen M. Du » Wed, 02 Sep 1998 04:00:00


$1) What happens in January, 2038, to cause this problem?  I assume its
$something to do with limitations in 32-bit calculations.

   Time, in Unix, is stored as the number of seconds since the beginning
of 1 January 1970.  It's presently stored as a 32-bit signed integer.
In January 2038, this counter will reach the greatest possible value
which it can represent (2 147 483 647) and will then become a
negative number.

$2) How do I know if I have a 16-bit or 32-bit OS?  Is there some way to tell
$by looking at the OS itself.  I know I can refer to white papers, and such.
$But can I tell from looking at something on the system?  I am assuming that
$OpenServer 5.0.0b is a 32-bit OS.

   It's 32-bit.  All versions of SCO Unix are.  Many versions of
SCO Xenix are - those which are Xenix/386 are 32-bit, as they're
designed for a 32-bit CPU; those which are Xenix/286 or earlier are
16-bit, as they're designed for 16-bit CPUs.
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