<Local Net>--LAN--<SERVER>--PPP--<ISP>

<Local Net>--LAN--<SERVER>--PPP--<ISP>

Post by Chris Moo » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Hi,

I've got a routing problem & hope someone can point me in the right direction.

I have a TCP/IP ethernet LAN with IP addresses of 192.0.0.X. The machine with IP
address of 192.0.0.1 has a PPP connection to an ISP.

The PPP interface has an IP address of 158.152.124.25 (ppp0).

All operations work fine directly from the PPP machine, using a default route
to the ISP & resolv.conf. Pinging the ISP from another machine on the LAN
routes out OK through 192.0.0.1 (visable from the modem lights), but nothing
is sent back. I would like all the LAN machines to be able to have Internet
access. Any pointers would be great.

Chris.  

 
 
 

<Local Net>--LAN--<SERVER>--PPP--<ISP>

Post by Giampaolo Tomasson » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00




Quote:> I have a TCP/IP ethernet LAN with IP addresses of 192.0.0.X. The machine
with IP
> address of 192.0.0.1 has a PPP connection to an ISP.

> The PPP interface has an IP address of 158.152.124.25 (ppp0).

> All operations work fine directly from the PPP machine, using a default
route
> to the ISP & resolv.conf. Pinging the ISP from another machine on the LAN
> routes out OK through 192.0.0.1 (visable from the modem lights), but
nothing
> is sent back. I would like all the LAN machines to be able to have
Internet
> access. Any pointers would be great.

Hi Chris,

you probably will not, as long as you don't obtain a suitable subnetwork
address from your ISP or a brain new network address from the RIPE (see
http://www.ripe.org/ ).

The fact is that your LAN is using someone else's Internet network address,
so answers to pings are sent to it, as far as this is the netaddr you are
using.

To be more precise, your LAN is acting as the NET-ROOT-NS-LAB network,
which is dedicated to testing by IANA.

There are two options to have your LAN correctly accessing internet
resources:

  a)    Obtain an internet network address from your ISP or from the RIPE, and
        change your local network addresses to it.
  b)    Install a proxy on the machine connected to your ISP, and change your
        local network address to 192.168.0.

The first solution could be more expensive (you will probably have to pay
your ISP to obtain a subnet address) and less safe, but is preferred
whenever you want to have all your machines accessible from outside your
organization.

The latter is simpler and cheaper, but this way you'll not be able to
'ping' outside resources nor to access your local resources from outside
(apart the ones started on the machine directly connected to the ISP).

Please note that using a proxy you have to configure some clients on the
LAN-based machines (like http browsers, mailing systems and the like) to
use the proxy in order to access remote resources.

You didn't specify the kind of O.S. and hardware you are running as the
gateway machine to your ISP. If you are using the SCO OpenServer 5, it
should have a suitable proxy daemon for this purpouse, I believe.

Greetings,

--

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