SCO TOLD ME A WRONG ANSWER YET AGAIN!!!!

SCO TOLD ME A WRONG ANSWER YET AGAIN!!!!

Post by Steve Harvanc » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00



I have been working with an SCO employee about some major problem on our O.D
Enterprise 5.0.0d and during these discussions he told me that I to increase
the SWAP space, all I need to do is to re-install the application with the
larger swap space and read the cpio tape back onto the disk.  The information
about the swap space will not be on the backup.

Well I did this and I have the following problems.

My system's swap space is back to what it originally was.
My software is know unregistered and I can not use the same keys to register
the software.
My system does not show all the components that I had installed.  The system
still functions as if it has them all.

I re-linked the kernel and re-booted and none of this has changed.

What can I do to correct this problem?

======================================================
Steve Harvancik
Consultant for OMNI Resources
AT&T NMC w/State of Wisconsin - DOA
316 W. Washington Ave #509
Madison, WI 53703
(608)-264-8475

 
 
 

SCO TOLD ME A WRONG ANSWER YET AGAIN!!!!

Post by Geoff Crawfor » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00



>I have been working with an SCO employee about some major problem on our O.D
>Enterprise 5.0.0d and during these discussions he told me that I to increase
>the SWAP space, all I need to do is to re-install the application with the
>larger swap space and read the cpio tape back onto the disk.  The information
>about the swap space will not be on the backup.

>Well I did this and I have the following problems.

>My system's swap space is back to what it originally was.
>My software is know unregistered and I can not use the same keys to register
>the software.
>My system does not show all the components that I had installed.  The system
>still functions as if it has them all.

>I re-linked the kernel and re-booted and none of this has changed.

>What can I do to correct this problem?

It sounds like you restored more than you wanted.  If your swap space was
not modified by realigning your disk drive (ie the default, required swap
area), then it would be added on the command line.  You would probably
never realize this since it's executed for you everytime at boot up.  
Check your /etc/rc2.d directory for a "swap" command.  It *probably* only
adds the default space.  You can change it to include a "swap -a file" or
a "swap -a /dev/device" line for the additional swap.  This command
probably got overwritten by what ever you restored.  

Your problem with the software license is probably a result of being in a
limbo state.  Some software "burns in" a key to the object code.  This
may have already been done, yet the key itself hasn't been written to
disk.  There are many different ways various applications use keys, its
hard to tell exactly what happened there without knowing the exact
behavior of the software.  Check with the manufacturer.

HTH.
======================================================================
Geoff Crawford                              Phone:    (201) 627 - 0307
Innovative Client Servers                   FAX:      (201) 627 - 0634

Denville NJ 07834

 
 
 

SCO TOLD ME A WRONG ANSWER YET AGAIN!!!!

Post by Sean Embr » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00



>I have been working with an SCO employee about some major problem on
>our O.D Enterprise 5.0.0d and during these discussions he told me that
>I to increase the SWAP space, all I need to do is to re-install the >application with the larger swap space and read the cpio tape =

back onto >the disk.  The information about the swap space will not be on the

Quote:>backup.

That is correct. The swap space allocation isn't kept on the cpio
backup.

Quote:

>Well I did this and I have the following problems.

>My system's swap space is back to what it originally was.

Then you didn't increase it during the install phase.

Quote:>My software is know unregistered and I can not use the same
>keys to register the software.

That is also correct. You can't. Call the registration center and obtain
new keys for the install code you now have. It should be free.

Quote:>My system does not show all the components that I had installed.  

Then you have more problems than just the swap space problem. The
database that tracks installed software is (or should be) on the backup.

Quote:>The system still functions as if it has them all.

Then the problem is registration, or the database.

Quote:

>I re-linked the kernel and re-booted and none of this has changed.

That wouldn't help.

Quote:

>What can I do to correct this problem?

1. Reinstall, choose the custom setup insted of the automatic setup.
2. Restore your backup.
3. Re-register the software by calling the registration center.

--
Sean

Remember to enjoy life. That's what it's all about.

 
 
 

SCO TOLD ME A WRONG ANSWER YET AGAIN!!!!

Post by Stephen M. Du » Sun, 14 Jan 1996 04:00:00


$I have been working with an SCO employee about some major problem on our O.D
$Enterprise 5.0.0d and during these discussions he told me that I to increase
$the SWAP space, all I need to do is to re-install the application with the
$larger swap space and read the cpio tape back onto the disk.  The information
$about the swap space will not be on the backup.

   One way to increase the swap space is to reinstall the OS, yes.
He is quite correct that the size of your swap device is not part
of a cpio backup.

$My system's swap space is back to what it originally was.

   This probably means that during the installation, you either set the
same swap space, or you told the installation program to maintain
the sizes and layouts of everything other than your root filesystem.
Since swap space isn't usually part of the root filesystem, that
means you told it to use the same swap space.

   If you have some unused space in a partition somewhere, you can
add it to your system's swap with the swap command.  Since you're
running OSR5, you can also add space from within a filesystem the
same way.  To make either of these changes permanent, just add
the appropriate command(s) to a startup script.
--

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stephen M. Dunn, CNE, ACE, Sr. Systems Analyst, United System Solutions Inc.
104 Carnforth Road, Toronto, ON, Canada M4A 2K7          (416) 750-7946 x251

 
 
 

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The current Xenix/SysV.3 binary compatibility that exists in ISC and
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--
Clay Haapala                    "Well, there was the process of sitting around

                                        -- Dilbert

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