Finding attached routers

Finding attached routers

Post by Ben Rosentha » Fri, 09 Oct 1998 04:00:00



Hi,

I have a SCO 5.0.2 Pentium pro server attached to a WAN.  There are two
NICs in the server.  One is for a small local network 200.200.200.1. The
other is connected to the rest of the network 10.1.1.2.  When the system
was initially installed the server did not automatically aquaria the
router tables.  (I have installed many of these systems and they all
"find" the network with out a problem.)  At this installation there is a
file sr99route that is read at boot time and issues the "route add"
command for each remote router address.  My question is: how do I get
the server to "find" the routes so the administrator does not have to do
a route add  when adding remote locations.  I have read the man pages
for routed and others.  I do not recall having to set a gateway to the
main network router.  Here is what the hosts file looks like.

200.200.200.1        thisserver
10.1.1.2                  thisserver

The main router address is 10.1.1.1

I realize this is a broad question, but a nudge in the right direction
would be appreciated.

TIA,

Ben Rosenthal

 
 
 

Finding attached routers

Post by Tony Earnsha » Sun, 11 Oct 1998 04:00:00



> I have a SCO 5.0.2 Pentium pro server attached to a WAN.  There are two
> NICs in the server.  One is for a small local network 200.200.200.1. The
> other is connected to the rest of the network 10.1.1.2.  When the system
> was initially installed the server did not automatically aquaria the
> router tables.

'Aquaria' means 'multiple fish tanks/ponds'. What's this got to do with
SCO Unix?

Quote:> (I have installed many of these systems and they all
> "find" the network with out a problem.)  At this installation there is a
> file sr99route that is read at boot time and issues the "route add"
> command for each remote router address.

If the file is named 'sr99route' then it won't do anything. If it's
named 'S99route' then it might, or then again, it might not, depending
on what's in it.

Quote:> My question is: how do I get
> the server to "find" the routes so the administrator does not have to do
> a route add  when adding remote locations.  I have read the man pages
> for routed and others.  I do not recall having to set a gateway to the
> main network router.

Then you're a lucky pig. Sounds like you've been working with routers
that have been broadcasting route updates and you've been been using the
standard routed configured in SCO TCP/IP. In this case you sound as if
you've come to a strange system that someone else has configured and
killed routed, defining the routes by hand. In which case you'll _have_
to add gateways manually, if the routers aren't broadcasting the routes.

Quote:>  Here is what the hosts file looks like.
> 200.200.200.1        thisserver
> 10.1.1.2             thisserver

Both nodes (NICs) should have different names from each other. What
you've got here is a disaster.

Quote:> The main router address is 10.1.1.1

'route add default 10.1.1.1'.

Tony

--
Tony Earnshaw
Systems Manager
Electronic_State
Groeneweg 150
3981 CP Bunnik, The Netherlands
Telephone:      +31 30 6563881
Fax:            +31 30 6562472

URL: http://www.e-state.com

Linux: Bill Gates' "Bend in the Road"

 
 
 

Finding attached routers

Post by Ben Rosentha » Wed, 14 Oct 1998 04:00:00




> > I have a SCO 5.0.2 Pentium pro server attached to a WAN.  There are two
> > NICs in the server.  One is for a small local network 200.200.200.1. The
> > other is connected to the rest of the network 10.1.1.2.  When the system
> > was initially installed the server did not automatically aquaria the
> > router tables.

> 'Aquaria' means 'multiple fish tanks/ponds'. What's this got to do with
> SCO Unix?

OOPS - The spell checker did it...  I was fishing for answers ;-)

Quote:> > (I have installed many of these systems and they all
> > "find" the network with out a problem.)  At this installation there is a
> > file sr99route that is read at boot time and issues the "route add"
> > command for each remote router address.

> If the file is named 'sr99route' then it won't do anything. If it's
> named 'S99route' then it might, or then again, it might not, depending
> on what's in it.

> > My question is: how do I get
> > the server to "find" the routes so the administrator does not have to do
> > a route add  when adding remote locations.  I have read the man pages
> > for routed and others.  I do not recall having to set a gateway to the
> > main network router.

> Then you're a lucky pig. Sounds like you've been working with routers
> that have been broadcasting route updates and you've been been using the
> standard routed configured in SCO TCP/IP. In this case you sound as if
> you've come to a strange system that someone else has configured and
> killed routed, defining the routes by hand. In which case you'll _have_
> to add gateways manually, if the routers aren't broadcasting the routes.

> >  Here is what the hosts file looks like.
> > 200.200.200.1        thisserver
> > 10.1.1.2             thisserver

> Both nodes (NICs) should have different names from each other. What
> you've got here is a disaster.

> > The main router address is 10.1.1.1

> 'route add default 10.1.1.1'.

> Tony

> --
> Tony Earnshaw
> Systems Manager
> Electronic_State
> Groeneweg 150
> 3981 CP Bunnik, The Netherlands
> Telephone:      +31 30 6563881
> Fax:            +31 30 6562472

> URL: http://www.e-state.com

> Linux: Bill Gates' "Bend in the Road"

  Thanks very much for the info.  Your analysis is perfect.

Ben Rosenthal