Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by Phil Gra » Sun, 14 Sep 1997 04:00:00



Hi can anyone help (Toby ?)

We have an ongoing saga with a server which we have upgraded from
5.0.2 to 5.0.4 basically to get the vision FS software.

We had a lot of trouble with this software for a while basically
because we couldn't get it to install in fully licensed and not eval
mode.

Depite all this, whilst it was in eval mode everything worked fine.
However, as soon as the problem was resolved with regard to the
licensing, it stopped working.

From a Windown 95 machine it no longer shows up in Network
Neighborhood and cannot be found with Find|Computer.

We have not changed ANY settings since it was working in eval mode,
Honest, none at all ......

Any help would be much appreciated !

Phil.

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by Toby Darlin » Tue, 16 Sep 1997 04:00:00



> >> We have an ongoing saga with a server which we have upgraded from
> 5.0.2 to 5.0.4 basically to get the vision FS software. <<

> I know I'm not answering your question but...

> Why did you select Vision FS over Advance File and Print?  I need to
> make this decision for a client pretty soon.  They will have a network
> of Windows 95 machines, using the Unix server as a file server.  We want
> to setup the Unix host as a POP3 server that will exchange mail with a
> local ISP.

> Does Vision FS provide a Windows 95 e-mail client that allows them to
> use the Unix mail so that Windows 95 and dumb terminal users can
> exchange messages with each other and the Internet?

AFPS has far better integration with Windows NT networks:
   primary/backup domain server
   file replication
   support of NT style local/global groups
    including browser support
   support for multi-domain trust relationships
see http://www.sco.com/products/Datasheets/afps.htm for more details.
VisionFS details are available from
http://www.vision.sco.com/products/visionfs

VisionFS does not ship with an email client. If you are running a POP3
server on the Unix side, there are a number of POP3 clients available
for both Unix and Windows. POP3 and SMB are unrelated.

Cheers
Toby

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by Dan Sada » Tue, 16 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>> We have an ongoing saga with a server which we have upgraded from

5.0.2 to 5.0.4 basically to get the vision FS software. <<

I know I'm not answering your question but...

Why did you select Vision FS over Advance File and Print?  I need to
make this decision for a client pretty soon.  They will have a network
of Windows 95 machines, using the Unix server as a file server.  We want
to setup the Unix host as a POP3 server that will exchange mail with a
local ISP.  

Does Vision FS provide a Windows 95 e-mail client that allows them to
use the Unix mail so that Windows 95 and dumb terminal users can
exchange messages with each other and the Internet?

TIA

!^NavFont02F02130007QG68HI[87BB

--
<...\<Dan Sadaka\...........>
<.................Web-Site One, Inc>
<...................................Your Home on the Web>

<...http://www.web-site1.com>

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by Dan Sada » Wed, 17 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>> AFPS has far better integration with Windows NT networks:

   primary/backup domain server
   file replication
   support of NT style local/global groups
    including browser support
   support for multi-domain trust relationships
see http://www.sco.com/products/Datasheets/afps.htm for more details.
VisionFS details are available from
http://www.vision.sco.com/products/visionfs

VisionFS does not ship with an email client. If you are running a POP3
server on the Unix side, there are a number of POP3 clients available
for both Unix and Windows. POP3 and SMB are unrelated. <<

Thanks for the reply.

The NT domain's don't interest me.  They never have :-)  Are there any
other differences I should know about?  Software compatibility, etc.?
Is it a fair assumption to make that VisionFS is more like Windows 95
networking without an NT server?  Just like if I put up an NTWS or just
another 95 machine and shared the files and the printers?

As for the POP3 server, I know the Netscape mail server  talks POP3.
Does sendmail?

If so, which will allow...

a) both Windows 95 users (using the GUI client of choice)  and dumb
terminals (using mail?) to exchange messages directly?  i.e. as though
they were *all* using mail.

b) exchange mail with an ISPs POP3 server

!^NavFont02F04140016NGC1HGF0NHeHH49QHEAHK\602C

--
<...\<Dan Sadaka\...........>
<.................Web-Site One, Inc>
<...................................Your Home on the Web>

<...http://www.web-site1.com>

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by James R. Sulliva » Wed, 17 Sep 1997 04:00:00




>> VisionFS does not ship with an email client. If you are running a POP3
>> server on the Unix side, there are a number of POP3 clients available
>> for both Unix and Windows. POP3 and SMB are unrelated. <<

While VisionFS does not ship with a POP3 client, a POP3 client is not
required for this configuration.

For a simple e-mail environment, it is sufficient to provide only
terminal emulation from the Windows client to the Unix server.
SCO OpenServer ships with several e-mail clients, including the
graphical scomail, the non-graphical, but easy to use 'scosh email',
and the various incarnations of mail/mailx for the true *s
in the group (remember when they were the only e-mail clients you
could run!).

SCO OpenServer Release 5.0.4 also ships with a terminal emulator,
SCO TermLite, that you can distribute with VisionFS.  So, with
Release 5.0.4 you have all the parts you need to deliver e-mail
in your environment.

Quote:> Thanks for the reply.

> The NT domain's don't interest me.  They never have :-)  Are there any
> other differences I should know about?  Software compatibility, etc.?
> Is it a fair assumption to make that VisionFS is more like Windows 95
> networking without an NT server?  Just like if I put up an NTWS or just
> another 95 machine and shared the files and the printers?

That's one way to look at it.

Quote:> As for the POP3 server, I know the Netscape mail server  talks POP3.
> Does sendmail?

OpenServer will talk POP3 to any POP3 client, regardless of the
underlying Mail Transfer Agent (sendmail or mmdf).  The Netscape
Mail Server adds some additional functionality and can be added to
an OpenServer solution if desired (but it is not required).

Quote:> If so, which will allow...

> a) both Windows 95 users (using the GUI client of choice)  and dumb
> terminals (using mail?) to exchange messages directly?  i.e. as though
> they were *all* using mail.

Yes.  I use Eudora on my laptop, but I regularly communicate with
people who use dumb terminals.  Sometimes, I look at my mailbox from
a dumb terminal, using elm (yes, I do remember those days :-).  If
your clients have Netscape, then they already have a POP3 client.

Quote:> b) exchange mail with an ISPs POP3 server

This part confuses me, or maybe leads me to believe that you are
confused.  From my understanding, a POP3 client receives its mail
from a POP3 server, but sends it mail through an SMTP server (at
least that's how I've seen it work).  Exchanging mail implies a
two way communication.  Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

--

----
Jim Sullivan           "Don't plant your bad days.  They grow into bad
SMB Segment Marketing   weeks and then bad months and before you know it

416 216 4611

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by Dan Sada » Thu, 18 Sep 1997 04:00:00




Quote:>> b) exchange mail with an ISPs POP3 server

> This part confuses me, or maybe leads me to believe that you are
> confused.  From my understanding, a POP3 client receives its mail
> from a POP3 server, but sends it mail through an SMTP server (at
> least that's how I've seen it work).  Exchanging mail implies a
> two way communication.  Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

Let me put this question another way...  This client will not have a
dedicated connection to the Internet.  Therefore, we want our internal
mail server to dial-out hourly and exchange mail with the POP3 server at
the ISP.  How can I accomplish this with the tools included in OSR
5.0.4?

Thanks for the reply, its been like pulling teeth trying to get my
questions answered here.  Great to hear that dumb and smart terminals
will share the same mail.  Did I also understand that either a POP3
client or SCO's graphical client can be used interchangeably?  Which
engine should I use?  sendmail or mmdf?  I know sendmail can get a bit
overwhelming.

TIA

!^NavFont02F039F0008QH8FHJA0FDB1

--
<...\<Dan Sadaka\...........>
<.................Web-Site One, Inc>
<...................................Your Home on the Web>

<...http://www.web-site1.com>

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by James R. Sulliva » Thu, 18 Sep 1997 04:00:00





> >> b) exchange mail with an ISPs POP3 server

> > This part confuses me, or maybe leads me to believe that you are
> > confused.  From my understanding, a POP3 client receives its mail
> > from a POP3 server, but sends it mail through an SMTP server (at
> > least that's how I've seen it work).  Exchanging mail implies a
> > two way communication.  Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

> Let me put this question another way...  This client will not have a
> dedicated connection to the Internet.  Therefore, we want our internal
> mail server to dial-out hourly and exchange mail with the POP3 server at
> the ISP.  How can I accomplish this with the tools included in OSR
> 5.0.4?

Consider the following diagram:

ISP <--A--> SCO OpenServer <--B--> Windows Clients

Connection A is transient.  SCO OpenServer will establish a connection
with this server hourly.

Connection B is constant.  It's the internal network.

In the words of Bill Nye, Please, Consider the Following:

Electronic mail is based on a store and forward concept.  Email moves
through the network by being copied from one machine to another,
until it reaches it's destination.  Generally, at the centre of the
network is a hub, which touches all incoming and outgoing mail.
The movement between the systems is accomplished using Simple Mail
Transfer Protocol (SMTP).  Programs like sendmail and mmdf are
Mail Transfer Agents that can talk SMTP.  In our example, on
connection A you want to talk SMTP.

Mail is read by nodes in the network.  In our example, the SCO
OpenServer box is the final resting place for e-mail.  This is
the Post Office Box that mail is sent to.  Once the mail has arrived
there, it is considered 'sent' by SMTP.  A Mail User Agent then
reads this mail.  Some Mail User Agents (Eudora, Netscape Mail)
use a Post Office Protocol to read the PO Box and transfer the
mail to another machine.  This is different from SMTP.  Other Mail
User Agents (mailx, scomail, scosh email) let the user read the mail
directly from the PO Box.

When a POP Mail User Agent sends mail, it cause an SMTP connection
to be created between the Mail Server and the Mail Client.  In our
example, the SCO box would talk SMTP to the windows clients to receive
their outgoing mail and then forward it on to the ISP when the
hourly connection is made.

Understand?  Thank you for Considering the Following.

Quote:> Thanks for the reply, its been like pulling teeth trying to get my
> questions answered here.

I'm assuming that you mean the newsgroup.  I think your questions
are a little fuzzy and so people aren't taking the time to answer
them because the answers aren't simple.  Part of this is because
you don't fully understand the nature of e-mail.  There are some
very good books out there about e-mail and the SCO documentation
is actually pretty good as well.  Look at the Mail and Messaging
Guide.

Quote:>  Great to hear that dumb and smart terminals
> will share the same mail.  Did I also understand that either a POP3
> client or SCO's graphical client can be used interchangeably?

Depends on how you have your POP Client configured.  On my system,
I have my e-mail client (Eudora) configured to leave the messages
on the server when I retrieve them.  It only deletes them after
14 days or when I delete them, which ever comes first.  This is a
precausion against my laptop crashing and burning.  If something
happened to my laptop, I'd still have the last couple weeks of
mail around.  I can look at the e-mail on my server independantly
from my Eudora client.

Quote:>  Which
> engine should I use?  sendmail or mmdf?  I know sendmail can get a bit
> overwhelming.

Religious debate.  Pick one, join the sect :-).

If this is your first time configuring e-mail, you probably want
to get some assistance.  Have you talked to a local SCO Reseller
in your area?  If not, perhaps we could connect you with one.
--

----
Jim Sullivan           "Don't plant your bad days.  They grow into bad
SMB Segment Marketing   weeks and then bad months and before you know it

416 216 4611

 
 
 

Can't see VisionFS server from Win95 network !!!

Post by Dan Sada » Sat, 20 Sep 1997 04:00:00







>>>> b) exchange mail with an ISPs POP3 server

>>> This part confuses me, or maybe leads me to believe that you are
>>> confused.  From my understanding, a POP3 client receives its mail
>>> from a POP3 server, but sends it mail through an SMTP server (at
>>> least that's how I've seen it work).  Exchanging mail implies a
>>> two way communication.  Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

>> Let me put this question another way...  This client will not have a
>> dedicated connection to the Internet.  Therefore, we want our
>> internal mail server to dial-out hourly and exchange mail with the
>> POP3 server at the ISP.  How can I accomplish this with the tools
>> included in OSR 5.0.4?

> Consider the following diagram:

> ISP <--A--> SCO OpenServer <--B--> Windows Clients

> Connection A is transient.  SCO OpenServer will establish a connection
> with this server hourly.

> Snip ...

> Understand?  Thank you for Considering the Following.

Thanks for the details, but what I was looking for is product names.
Again, how can I accomplish this with the tools included in OSR 5.0.4?

Quote:

>> Thanks for the reply, its been like pulling teeth trying to get my
>> questions answered here.

> I'm assuming that you mean the newsgroup.  I think your questions
> are a little fuzzy and so people aren't taking the time to answer
> them because the answers aren't simple.  Part of this is because
> you don't fully understand the nature of e-mail.  There are some
> very good books out there about e-mail and the SCO documentation
> is actually pretty good as well.  Look at the Mail and Messaging
> Guide.

I admit I don't fully understand all the nuances of e-mail, especially
in the SCO world. However, I am making up a proposal and, therefore,
only need to know which products are necessary to accomplish this task
at this point.  (And approximate setup time.)

Quote:

>> Great to hear that dumb and smart terminals
>> will share the same mail.  Did I also understand that either a POP3
>> client or SCO's graphical client can be used interchangeably?

> Depends on how you have your POP Client configured.  On my system,
> I have my e-mail client (Eudora) configured to leave the messages
> on the server when I retrieve them.  It only deletes them after
> 14 days or when I delete them, which ever comes first.  This is a
> precausion against my laptop crashing and burning.  If something
> happened to my laptop, I'd still have the last couple weeks of
> mail around.  I can look at the e-mail on my server independantly
> from my Eudora client.

Not sure how this answers the question.  By POP3 client, I meant, for
example a program like Eudora or Netscape mail (though I admit this
wasn't clear).  Whereas I understand that SCO has a graphical
(X-windows) client that could also be run on the Windows 95 workstation
as well as a program like Eudora.  The question was, can both be used.
(I believe they can.)

Quote:>> Which
>> engine should I use?  sendmail or mmdf?  I know sendmail can get a
>> bit overwhelming.

> Religious debate.  Pick one, join the sect :-).
> > If this is your first time configuring e-mail, you probably want
> to get some assistance.  Have you talked to a local SCO Reseller
> in your area?  If not, perhaps we could connect you with one.

Though I have been selling SCO since the mid 80s, this is the first time
I'll be using it for Internet connectivity.  Their PPP was not very
stable before the 5.x series (at least, that is what I was told at the
time.)

As a Novell dealer, I have setup GroupWise for internal mail with an
SMTP gateway to an ISP.  I have done much with e-mail, but I guess my
terminology is not quite there yet.

I did, finally, get the proposal made up after talking with someone I
met through Jones Business Systems (JBS).  What he does at his company
is exactly what I want for my client.  That is, the ability to use a
Windows 95 mail-enabled application (e.g. ACT!) to send mail to

a) Other windows users on the LAN
b) Dumb terminal users connected to the SCO Host.
c) Internet mail users outside the company.

He uses the Internet Mail applet that comes with 95 as a go-between.
This applet is setup to talk to the POP3 server on the SCO Unix host.
ACT! is setup to send mail to this applet.  The POP3 server drops the
mail into the same mailboxes that are accessed by the standard SCO mail
programs (mail, elf, mutt).

In addition, these messages are transferred to the ISPs server hourly.
I assume sendmail is doing this, but am not sure.

To wrap this one up, the answer is that all the products necessary to do
this are included in 5.0.4.  (At least this is my understanding at this
point :-)

Thanks again.

P.S.  I am signing up for the sendmail workshop at Networld.  Wish me
luck!

--
<...\<Dan Sadaka\...........>
<.................Web-Site One, Inc>
<...................................Your Home on the Web>

<...http://www.web-site1.com>

 
 
 

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