Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Mark A. Davi » Sat, 04 Oct 1997 04:00:00



OK, working really hard trying to develop a backup strategy which will
work for this new system (OS-5.0.4).  Reviewed Bela's old posts and the
SSL disks and documentation.

 | cpio -ocC 10240 > /dev/rct0

I have concluded that I should use cpio for backups, and that it should
contain "-c" for portability "-C 10240" for optimal performance on our
DDS-3 drive (tested as fastest), "> /dev/rct0"  to the tape drive.  For
those curious- on the LXPro 4x PPro200, NetRaid, DDS-3 drive, "find .
-print | cpio -cC 10240 > /dev/rct0" is showing about 1.57 MB/sec
performance.  Since the drive is showing about 1.6 to 1.8 on compression
ratio for the tests, I think this is acceptable throughput for a 1
MB/sec native drive, 2 MB/sec with max data compression.  (beats the
*HELL* out of my old Exabyte 8200 :) )

 find . -mount -depth -print |

After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

I have also decided that I want to split my backup into several chunks,
with setmarks between them (tape wsm) using the non-rewind device.  This
should allow me to zoom to certain sections of the tape and cut restore
times GREATLY.  But I can't think of a good way to organize this using
"find".  I thought about using "-prune" to exclude certain dirs, then
write setmarks, then continue with another cpio naming the excluded
directories one by one.  But "-prune" is incompatible with "-depth".
Very confusing.  Adding to this confusion is decrypting the man page
examples of:

 find . -name SCCS -prune -o -print

and

 find . -print -name SCCS -prune

Any recommendations for this situation? :

  create directory listing file (some incarnation of find or ls)
  instruct drive to load appropriate tape (robot drive) (hp mtx)
cpio the directory listing file first "/!tape_dir" (or similar)
cpio all files (not dirs) in /
cpio all directories EXCEPT /mis /op /home  (system and OA programs)
  setmark
cpio /mis    (large accounting and clinical apps & data)
  setmark
cpio /op     (operations apps & data)
  setmark
cpio /home   (all home directories and OA files)
  setmark
  rewind
  unload tape

I need something which is reliable, and will deal properly with all of
SCO Openserver's symbolic links.  (I prefer not to use prepackaged
backup software.)  Thanks for any assistance!
--
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Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Robert Li » Sun, 05 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>OK, working really hard trying to develop a backup strategy which will
>work for this new system (OS-5.0.4).  Reviewed Bela's old posts and the

This is seldom a good strategy in the long run.  (I can say that becuase
I used to do it your way.) There are several excellent backup/restore
programs around these days.   Just buy and use them.   For example, your
hard drive spins through the side of your computer and the service dude
hands you a new one on the spot, how long until you're running again?

Quote:>After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
>use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
>decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
>What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

It seems that way until you realize that permissions and timestamps
should be restored from the arhive instead of defaulting to whatever
your current uid/umask is.   If you use -depth, you'll create the
deepest file, then reset the inode stuff for it.   As you walk up,
you'll now "fix" the entries for th edirectories you just created.

Quote:>I have also decided that I want to split my backup into several chunks,
>with setmarks between them (tape wsm) using the non-rewind device.  This
>should allow me to zoom to certain sections of the tape and cut restore
>times GREATLY.  But I can't think of a good way to organize this using
>"find".  I thought about using "-prune" to exclude certain dirs, then

You could do a find to a file, then bust it up with traditional text
processing tools (awk, perl, sed).  

You could run multiple finds - I sometimes run one for users directories,
one for source code, one for hardware files, and one for everything else.
This is for exactly the reasons you list.

Quote:>I need something which is reliable, and will deal properly with all of
>SCO Openserver's symbolic links.  (I prefer not to use prepackaged
>backup software.)  Thanks for any assistance!

In all, this is not the place to skimp for $200 or whatever that type
of tool is selling for these days...

Good luck.

--


 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Jean-Pierre Radle » Sun, 05 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Robert Lipe propounded:

| >I need something which is reliable, and will deal properly with all of
| >SCO Openserver's symbolic links.  (I prefer not to use prepackaged
| >backup software.)  Thanks for any assistance!
|
| In all, this is not the place to skimp for $200 or whatever that type
| of tool is selling for these days...

IOW: bitwise, bytefoolish.

--

 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Kees Hendrik » Sun, 05 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> >  find . -mount -depth -print |

> > After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
> > use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
> > decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
> > What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

> "-depth" causes directories to come after their files.  So if you have
> directory /foo and file /foo/bar, they will come out in the order:
> /foo/bar, then /foo.  Some versions of cpio (I'm not sure about OSR5's)
> copy the permissions of the file onto the directory; that is, if you
> wrote /foo first, then /foo/bar, the directory foo would end up with
> foo/bar's ownership and permissions.  That could be bad.  By forcing the
> directories to come after any files that might override their
> permissions, you avoid this problem.

> I suspect it's a non-problem with versions of cpio shipped this decade.

The -depth flag makes it possible for non-root users to backup/restore
read-only directories, which otherwise fails:

   $ mkdir dir
   $ touch dir/file
   $ chmod 500 dir
   $ find dir | cpio -oac > backup
   1 blocks
   $ chmod 700 dir
   $ rm -r dir
   $ cpio -icdmuv < backup
   dir
   cpio: Cannot create <dir/file>: Permission denied (error 13)
   dir/file
   1 blocks

Root never needs -depth.

--

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Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Bela Lubki » Sun, 05 Oct 1997 04:00:00



>  find . -mount -depth -print |

> After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
> use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
> decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
> What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

"-depth" causes directories to come after their files.  So if you have
directory /foo and file /foo/bar, they will come out in the order:
/foo/bar, then /foo.  Some versions of cpio (I'm not sure about OSR5's)
copy the permissions of the file onto the directory; that is, if you
wrote /foo first, then /foo/bar, the directory foo would end up with
foo/bar's ownership and permissions.  That could be bad.  By forcing the
directories to come after any files that might override their
permissions, you avoid this problem.

I suspect it's a non-problem with versions of cpio shipped this decade.

Quote:>   create directory listing file (some incarnation of find or ls)
>   instruct drive to load appropriate tape (robot drive) (hp mtx)
> cpio the directory listing file first "/!tape_dir" (or similar)
> cpio all files (not dirs) in /
> cpio all directories EXCEPT /mis /op /home  (system and OA programs)
>   setmark
> cpio /mis    (large accounting and clinical apps & data)
>   setmark
> cpio /op     (operations apps & data)
>   setmark
> cpio /home   (all home directories and OA files)
>   setmark
>   rewind
>   unload tape

Yes, create the listing first, then automatically split it into
sections.  I recommend using a one-pass filter to identify which set
each file belongs to, e.g.:

  find .... > file_list
  awk '
    /^\/mis[\/.]/ { print >> "mis_list" }
    /^\/op[\/.]/ { print >> "op_list" }
    ...' file_list
  cpio -ocC10240 -O /dev/nrct0 < mis_list
  tape wsm /dev/rct0
  cpio -ocC10240 -O /dev/nrct0 < op_list
  tape wsm /dev/rct0
  ...

I agree with others that a packaged backup solution is a good idea.  You
might still make this sort of layer on top of it (if it doesn't already
support it).  But for recoverability, the super-tar packages are
unbeatable.

Quote:>Bela<

--
Sandy & Bela Lubkin are traveling around the world for a year!  Currently
posting from Moscow, Russia.  Next: St. Petersburg; then Europe.  Stories
and pictures are at http://www.armory.com/~alexia/trip/trip.html
 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Juergen Ru » Mon, 06 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:> find . -mount -depth -print |
>After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
>use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
>decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
>What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

It depends on who restores it. If the superuser restores it, it is not
necessary.
"-depth" will first show all directory entries, then the directory,
whereas without -depth the find command will show first the directory,
then the entries.
Now consider the case, you (as normal user) have a backup that was
taken without -depth. You want to restore it. You first restore the
directory and cpio does an implicit chown() and chmod() to that dir.
Then come the files and you are maybe no longer permitted to write into
that directory.
Now consider the -depth case. You first restore the files. In order to
do that cpio has to create the directory, but with your default
permissions. Then you restore the directory. Since it is already there,
cpio only has to chown() and chmod() it.

As you see, in the first case there is a danger that you cannot restore
completely, but only if you restore as normal user.

Good bye
Juergen
--
Berlin                    Juergen Russ                           Germany

 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Peter Bisse » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00


I only have 5.0.2 so don't know if this is on .4 or not, but have you
looked at /usr/lib/sysadmin/cbackup. It does everything that you are
talking about. Works too!

 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Mark A. Davi » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> >OK, working really hard trying to develop a backup strategy which will
> >work for this new system (OS-5.0.4).  Reviewed Bela's old posts and the

> This is seldom a good strategy in the long run.  (I can say that becuase
> I used to do it your way.) There are several excellent backup/restore
> programs around these days.   Just buy and use them.

Hmm

Quote:> For example, your
> hard drive spins through the side of your computer and the service dude
> hands you a new one on the spot, how long until you're running again?

RAID-5 with hot spare.... 0 downtime :)  Auto-reconstruct.  But assuming
otherwise, I suppose I would just use the emergency boot disk and the
last complete cpio tape, no?

Quote:> >After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
> >use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
> >decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
> >What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

> It seems that way until you realize that permissions and timestamps
> should be restored from the arhive instead of defaulting to whatever
> your current uid/umask is.   If you use -depth, you'll create the
> deepest file, then reset the inode stuff for it.   As you walk up,
> you'll now "fix" the entries for th edirectories you just created.

But is that still a problem in modern cpio's??  It seems hard to imagine
it still would be a problem in 1997!

Quote:> >I have also decided that I want to split my backup into several chunks,
> >with setmarks between them (tape wsm) using the non-rewind device.  This
> >should allow me to zoom to certain sections of the tape and cut restore
> >times GREATLY.  But I can't think of a good way to organize this using
> >"find".  I thought about using "-prune" to exclude certain dirs, then

> You could do a find to a file, then bust it up with traditional text
> processing tools (awk, perl, sed).

Yep, that is what Bela suggested also.  I have to think about it for a
while, I was originally thinking of using separate "finds", hence my
asking about "-prune" and "-depth" and such

Quote:> You could run multiple finds - I sometimes run one for users directories,
> one for source code, one for hardware files, and one for everything else.
> This is for exactly the reasons you list.

Yep :)   I am just concerned mostly about -depth, which is kind of
backward from what I am used to seeing/thinking.  The reason this is all
an issue right now is because I am moving things over from the old
system, and I have the opportunity to move directory structures around
easily.  So I was thinking about what limitations/caveats for backups
locations would have.

Quote:> >I need something which is reliable, and will deal properly with all of
> >SCO Openserver's symbolic links.  (I prefer not to use prepackaged
> >backup software.)  Thanks for any assistance!

> In all, this is not the place to skimp for $200 or whatever that type
> of tool is selling for these days...

See other posting.. I had a feeling I would have to explain :) :)

Quote:> Good luck.

Thanks!

--
/--------------------------------------------------------------------\
|   Mark A. Davis,  |Lake Taylor| Voice: (757)-461-5001x431 8-4:30ET |

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\--------------------------------------------------------------------/

 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Mark A. Davi » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Jean-Pierre Radley wrote:

> Robert Lipe propounded:
> | In <34356036.4...@yy.laketaylor.org> "Mark A. Davis" <m...@yy.laketaylor.org> writes:
> | >I need something which is reliable, and will deal properly with all of
> | >SCO Openserver's symbolic links.  (I prefer not to use prepackaged
> | >backup software.)  Thanks for any assistance!
> |
> | In all, this is not the place to skimp for $200 or whatever that type
> | of tool is selling for these days...

> IOW: bitwise, bytefoolish.

Oh, I could not agree further!  But it is not a cost issue here.  I
prefer using stock tools and shell scripts, especially when it is not a
problem, I already have the tools, and when it might be necessary anyway
to take advantage of special robot drive features.

I have received lots of messages from people saying I should use a
pre-canned backup program.  I will use LoneTar as an example.  I have
nothing against Lone-Tar or Cactus software, if fact I have a great deal
of respect for them and would recommend their products to sites who can
benefit from their products.  I just want to illustrate that perhaps it
is not needed here, and/or not what I had in mind for a backup.  I took
their list of features:

===

  1. Available on most flavors of UNIX.

cpio everywhere.  With cpio -c, I'm sure compatability is good

  2. Easy to use MENU interface. All LONE-TAR Features are accessible
     through the Menu System.

not needed here

  3. Includes interface source code for easy modifications and enduser
     customizing.

sh scripting- ultimate in flexibility

  4. BIT-LEVEL Verification of archived data.

Don't need.  Tape drive verification, see below

  5. On-the-fly data compression, guarantees to at least double the
storage
     capacity of your backup device.

Tape drive does that

  6. DOUBLE-BUFFERING for increased speed.

NA- done at night, plenty of time.  Close to full tape speed with cpio
as is.

  7. Wild card support during Backups and Restores.

find *    cpio -i *

  8. Backs up everything including device files, empty directories,
links,
     symbolic links, Virtual Files and NFS mounted file systems.

cpio too

  9. Backs up RAW Partitions (i.e. Informix, Oracle and Progress
Databases,
     just to name a few).

NA here

 10. Includes TAPE-TELL, which prevents the accidental overwriting of
your
     most current backup.

Not needed here

 11. Includes CRONY, a complete interface to manage all your "cron"
jobs,
     especially LONE-TAR unattended backups.

Not needed here

 12. Ability to Log-off users before starting the backup, and keep them
off
     until the backup is complete.
quiet system at night

 13. Capable of automatically ejecting 4mmDAT and 8mm tapes upon
successful
     completion of backup and verification.

mtx eject

 14. Full on-line documentation

man, scohelp

 15. Command line operation using familiar "tar" options and modifiers

sh

 16. Outstanding Technical support services, with 24 hour/7 day a week
     Technical Support during a system crash, for AIR-BAG users.

Not needed here

 17. FLAT FILE restore allows restoring files exactly where you want
them.

cpio -A

 18. Pre-configured Inclusion and Exclusion lists.

find

 19. Non-Destructive restore with interactive option.

Not needed

 20. Password security.

Not needed

 21. Hardware independent.

cpio

 22. Complete log files of Backups, Restores and Verifications.

sh logging

 23. Error recovery from bad media, tape or hard drive.

not sure about that one

 24. Allows Incremental backups to run unattended, and in most cases,
fit on
     only one tape.

I have more than enough space

 25. DOES NOT use "tar" but is completely "tar" compatible, to provide
an
     easy learning curve from standard Unix systems.
 26. Easy file recovery from any "tar" format tapes.

what about special files and such?  not an issue with cpio, right?

 27. Backup status reports and automatic logging.

sh logging

 28. Override file locking, for backups while the system is running.

Is that a problem with find & cpio??

 29. Notification of file size changes during backup or verify.

there are no changing files at night I am worried about

 30. Master and Incremental Strategy as well as Selective backup, both
     from a Menu or command line usage.

We will always back up the whole system- never incremental

 31. Support for larger blocking factors than "tar" for increased speed.

cpio -C

 32. Easy view of backup history from the Menu.
 33. Log files created to provide easy view of all archive files
involved
     in last operation (i.e. Backup, Restore, Verify).

cpio -i < /dev/rct0 ./!tape_dir ; more !tape_dir ; fgrep whatever
!tape_dir

 34. Compression to non-seeking devices such as tape.
we will be using only 4mm & 8mm

 35. All file information is recorded including: date, time, size,
     attributes, permissions, owner, group and version.

cpio

 36. Error recovery - able to do salvage backup of failing hard drive.

RAID 5

 37. Ability to set the depth level of sub-directories to backup.

find -depth -purge -level

 38. Non-destructive Restore option, interactive or fully automated.

cpio -A

 39. Volume number checking to prevent restoring out of sequence.

Not an issue here

 40. Large blocking support for faster restores.

cpio -C

 41. Error Recovery - can recover from bad spots on tape or floppy, and
the
     familiar "Directory not in proper format" error.

8mm & 4mm drives

 42. Relative restore option, allows an entire section of the archive to
be
     restored as the directory tree under a directory of the user's
choice.
 43. Flat file restore strips off absolute pathnames to directly restore
     files to the directory of your choice.

cpio -A

 44. Selective file restore by name or wild card.

cpio -i    *name*

 45. Update Restore, updates files on hard disk out of date with files
on
     the archive.

Not needed here

 46. Restore files by date of creation/modification, (i.e. all files
created
     after November 5, 1990)

Not needed here- we would go by the tape listings

 47. Trim filenames to 14 characters, for transferring to Operating
Systems
     which don't support extended length filenames.

Not an issue

 48. Supports Dos-Tar from Cactus International.
 49. DOS Text-mode conversion when restoring files from a DOS Platform.

Don't use MS-DOS

 50. THREE LEVELS OF VERIFICATION:
 51. Verification of files from the Menu, or command line usage.
 52. Verification log reports:

I really don't think I need to verify from tape to HD contents.  This is
a 4MM drive, which will read-after-write and the data is coming from a
RAID-5 platform.  Granted, I suppose it is possible that the SCSI bus or
drivers could lose something, but it is extremely remote.  Anway, if I
really had to, I could verify using cpio, although it would take a
while.

===

Certainly Lone-Tar is an excellent product for many types of
environments.  But
with our situation and hardware, it doesn't seem to offer anything much
over
what we already have and what our requirements are.

Now, what it appears it does not do that I need:

1) splitting backups into sections with setmarks between them (file
seeking)

2) robotic drive control

both of which I can do with stock tools.

And possible negatives for us:

1) Costs money (certainly not much, it is a good value, but not if I
don't
   need it!)

2) Another thing to load, maintain, update.

3) Possibly another step in system restoration, if regular tar will not
work with it to restore empty files, special files, FIFO's, etc

So, now, anyone brave enough to read all my rambling ;) understands why
I would prefer to just use stock tools.

--
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Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Mark A. Davi » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> >  find . -mount -depth -print |

> > After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
> > use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
> > decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
> > What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

> "-depth" causes directories to come after their files.  So if you have
> directory /foo and file /foo/bar, they will come out in the order:
> /foo/bar, then /foo.  Some versions of cpio (I'm not sure about OSR5's)
> copy the permissions of the file onto the directory; that is, if you
> wrote /foo first, then /foo/bar, the directory foo would end up with
> foo/bar's ownership and permissions.  That could be bad. By forcing the
> directories to come after any files that might override their
> permissions, you avoid this problem.

Hmm, that does sound kind of historical.  Is there some test I can
perform or way to find out if that is still a problem (or ever has been)
in OS-5?

Quote:> I suspect it's a non-problem with versions of cpio shipped this decade.

I tend to agree with that premise, it just seems like something that
would have been known and corrected a long time ago.

--
/--------------------------------------------------------------------\
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|Information Systems|Norfolk, VA| from USENET remove anti-spam "yy." |
\--------------------------------------------------------------------/

 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Bela Lubki » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> > For example, your
> > hard drive spins through the side of your computer and the service dude
> > hands you a new one on the spot, how long until you're running again?

> RAID-5 with hot spare.... 0 downtime :)  Auto-reconstruct.  But assuming
> otherwise, I suppose I would just use the emergency boot disk and the
> last complete cpio tape, no?

Yes, you could, but it will take longer than with a packaged recovery
product.  You will be struggling through in a panic, inventing your own
emergency restore procedure under pressure.  From your long list of
reasons you don't need it, this sounds like the main reason you *do*.
If your ad hoc restore procedure doesn't work the first time, how many
consecutive hours of down time can the hospital sustain?

Oh, and regarding RAID: if the RAID controller board bursts into flames,
then what?  It could still take a long time to assemble replacement
hardware; RAID 5 only protects against *drive* failures -- and then only
1 or maybe 2 drives can go down at once.  An earthquake or lightning
strike might kill more (or for a more likely example, a water leak or a
fire).

Quote:> > >After reading and testing and playing, I am still not sure WHY I want to
> > >use "-depth", but all the examples show it.  It seems backwards to
> > >decend completely down a directory and back it up to tape backwards.
> > >What gives?  Is this really necessary for a superuser backup?

> > It seems that way until you realize that permissions and timestamps
> > should be restored from the arhive instead of defaulting to whatever
> > your current uid/umask is.   If you use -depth, you'll create the
> > deepest file, then reset the inode stuff for it.   As you walk up,
> > you'll now "fix" the entries for th edirectories you just created.

> But is that still a problem in modern cpio's??  It seems hard to imagine
> it still would be a problem in 1997!

It is -- Robert's post reminded me.  But only for users, not for root,
so probably not a problem for you.  Why?  Because if root creates a
directory which is write-protected against owner (root), root can still
write to it.  Write-protection isn't effective against root.

Quote:>Bela<

--
Sandy & Bela Lubkin are traveling around the world for a year!  Currently
posting from Moscow, Russia.  Next: St. Petersburg; then Europe.  Stories
and pictures are at http://www.armory.com/~alexia/trip/trip.html
 
 
 

Define find "-depth",cpio stuff,tape fun!

Post by Randolph B. Bro » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00



: Robert Lipe wrote (also in part -- rbb):

: > For example, your
: > hard drive spins through the side of your computer and the service dude
: > hands you a new one on the spot, how long until you're running again?

: RAID-5 with hot spare.... 0 downtime :)  Auto-reconstruct.  But assuming
: otherwise, I suppose I would just use the emergency boot disk and the
: last complete cpio tape, no?

I'm certainly no expert on OS5, but I have fought with CMW+ (based on
ODT3, for those of you who don't know). Beware the Emergency Boot
Floppy. It can get you out of a lot of fixes, but starting with a
fresh disk isn't one of them. (Again, CMW+, remember... so YMMV)

I have to deliver a highly customized system to clients thousands of
miles away. I want to give them the ability to restore the system as
I sent it to them, or to create their own complete, self-contained
backups, and I need to keep a self-contained copy for myself to
simulate their system in my lab. I started off with the ODT3 EBF and
a complete backup tape (written with spax, a secure version of pax,
which I prefer to tar and cpio, but hey...) but then had to go ten
rounds with "mkdev fd" to get the tools I really needed onto the EBF.
I was missing such little things as mkfs, and I believe fdisk and
divvy and ... I also had to spend some time writing a shell script to
perform the error-prone parts of the restore, and getting that and
the tools to execute it onto the EBF.

I now can do a complete restore to a brand-new system using only my
modified EBF set and the tape; but it took a lot of practice first.
So don't assume the EBF will solve all problems. You may find that
you have to go back to the distribution media and repeat exactly your
original incantations before you can restore your backup.

This is not a argument that you shouldn't do what you want; I just
hope you can practice working out the bugs before you need to do it
for real with the users watching over your shoulder. ... rb

 
 
 

1. Need help making tape drive "Available" after "Defining"

 I'm looking for some help with our RS-6000 and its accompanying
 IBM 7207-001  SCSI 1/4" tape drive (not model 011).

 I am able to use SMIT or mkdev (by hand) to define the 150mb drive
 but I am never able to "configure" it to the Available state so that
 I can install (via SMIT ->  root# smit iou)  other software from
 various vendors.

 This is the error (from smit and command line):

    # mkdev -l rmt0
    Method error (/etc/methods/cfgsctape):
        0514-047 Cannot access a device.

 I have tried the following techniques along with IBM tech support,
  but with no luck:

 0)  power-cycled the tape drive/stuck in a tape
 1)  checking all the cables/terminators
 2)  verify scsi board, visually.   probably ok since the 400mb
        SCSI disk is operating properly.
 3)  verify scsi address (was 3, we tried 4 just for kicks - same result)
 4)  completely removing the device via s/w and tried mkdev again.

 Step 4 was repeated many times.
 The device address is 00-01-00-40   or something similar.

 The "Defining" command  is right from the man page and seems to work:

 # mkdev -d -c tape -t 150mb -s scsi -p scsi0 -w 40

  There is the distinct possibility that the drive is faulty, but a few weeks ago
 (when it was last used) it successfully booted from tape so that I could install
 AIX windows from one of the 4 AIX3.2 tape volumes.  No problems there.

 I appreciate any insight to the problem or helpful hints.  Thanks in advance..

 Mike
        (415)-322-6390 x185

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