Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Ash K » Sun, 01 Dec 2002 08:37:51



Hello Linux Gurus,

I have been lost in the dungeons of Windows/VB/Registries for as long, that
I can't even remember.  I have made an early new year's resolution to learn
Linux and start developing applications on this platform.

I am not expecting any shortcuts, however, much like Luke Skywalker, I am
already at a certain level with my programming skills.  I want to leverage
that.  I am interested in opinions on the following topics:
1. Where do I go next after my Red Hat 8.0 installation?
2. What is the most favorite language of choice for business development?
3. I have been spoiled by the III part components in the Visual Basic
development environment.  Are there such things in C++ (If that is what you
guys suggest)?
4. Are there any web based training courses available?  Red Hat has some.  I
somehow am not convinced with the value compared to its price.

Please, any help will be highly appreciated.

Regards.

AK

 
 
 

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Paul Lutu » Sun, 01 Dec 2002 09:01:48



> Hello Linux Gurus,

> I have been lost in the dungeons of Windows/VB/Registries for as long,
> that I can't even remember.  I have made an early new year's resolution
> to learn Linux and start developing applications on this platform.

> I am not expecting any shortcuts, however, much like Luke Skywalker, I
> am already at a certain level with my programming skills.  I want to
> leverage that.  I am interested in opinions on the following topics: 1.
> Where do I go next after my Red Hat 8.0 installation?

After installing Red Hat 8? Learn Red Hat 8. Unlike installing Windows,
installing Linux is the beginning, not the end, of an amicable,
educational experience. You could easily spend years learning Linux, and
every day spent would be potentially profitable in your future.

Quote:> 2. What is the most favorite language of choice for business

development?

There really is no "favorite language of choice". It depends on who the
client is, what they intend to do, and the lifecycle of the application.

For large, long-term projects with big time investments, C++ or something
like that.

For quick projects where an attractive interface is required, either Java
or a Web-page-based front end to something else.

But these are obviously highly personal choices and preferences.

Quote:> 3. I have been spoiled by the III part components in the Visual Basic
> development environment.  Are there such things in C++ (If that is what
> you guys suggest)?

No, in fact, even Microsoft doesn't plan to support Visual Basic in the
future, so you need to reevaluate this choice in your life, no matter what
you also do.

There are plenty of better alternatives for fast project development.

Quote:> 4. Are there any web based training courses available?  Red Hat has
> some.  I somehow am not convinced with the value compared to its price.

IMHO you are better off buying a few books, taking some time off, and
reading them -- while practicing with your computer, of course.

--
Paul Lutus
www.arachnoid.com

 
 
 

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Per Blomqvis » Sun, 01 Dec 2002 10:51:33


Revolution here, revolution there...
And alwais a fresh start?

Ever hear of:
"Dig where you stand"??



>>Hello Linux Gurus,

>>I have been lost in the dungeons of Windows/VB/Registries for as long,
>>that I can't even remember.  I have made an early new year's resolution
>>to learn Linux and start developing applications on this platform.

>>I am not expecting any shortcuts, however, much like Luke Skywalker, I
>>am already at a certain level with my programming skills.  I want to
>>leverage that.  I am interested in opinions on the following topics: 1.
>>Where do I go next after my Red Hat 8.0 installation?

> After installing Red Hat 8? Learn Red Hat 8. Unlike installing Windows,
> installing Linux is the beginning, not the end, of an amicable,
> educational experience. You could easily spend years learning Linux, and
> every day spent would be potentially profitable in your future.

>>2. What is the most favorite language of choice for business

> development?

<snip>

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> There really is no "favorite language of choice". It depends on who the
> client is, what they intend to do, and the lifecycle of the application.

> For large, long-term projects with big time investments, C++ or something
> like that.

> For quick projects where an attractive interface is required, either Java
> or a Web-page-based front end to something else.

> But these are obviously highly personal choices and preferences.

>>3. I have been spoiled by the III part components in the Visual Basic
>>development environment.  Are there such things in C++ (If that is what
>>you guys suggest)?

> No, in fact, even Microsoft doesn't plan to support Visual Basic in the
> future, so you need to reevaluate this choice in your life, no matter what
> you also do.

> There are plenty of better alternatives for fast project development.

>>4. Are there any web based training courses available?  Red Hat has
>>some.  I somehow am not convinced with the value compared to its price.

> IMHO you are better off buying a few books, taking some time off, and
> reading them -- while practicing with your computer, of course.

( u are pathetic )
 
 
 

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Steve B » Sun, 01 Dec 2002 12:51:10



Quote:> Hello Linux Gurus,

> I have been lost in the dungeons of Windows/VB/Registries for as
long, that
> I can't even remember.  I have made an early new year's resolution
to learn
> Linux and start developing applications on this platform.

> I am not expecting any shortcuts, however, much like Luke Skywalker,
I am
> already at a certain level with my programming skills.  I want to
leverage
> that.  I am interested in opinions on the following topics:
> 1. Where do I go next after my Red Hat 8.0 installation?

Now you need to learn Unix/Linux  especially if you plan to program
for the platform. There are many good books a general references on
most peoples shelves are:

Unix System Administration Handbook  by Evi Nemeth et al.
Unix in a Nutshell by Arnold Robbins

If you are serious about programming on Unix then Richard Stevens
books are on all serious Unix developers list

Beginning Linux Programming by Neil Matthew  is a good intro to Linux
development.

There are many other books and you find you are suddenly build an
library of O'Reilly books.

Quote:> 2. What is the most favorite language of choice for business

development?

It all depends on what type of development you need to do.  PHP for
web based, Perl for general purpose scripting language, C for systems
development, Java and many, many others.  What you will find it the
whole approach to programming on Unix is drastically different from
Windows.  Especially if you were a VB developer used to RAD tools.

Quote:> 3. I have been spoiled by the III part components in the Visual

Basic

I have no idea what you mean by "III part components". If you are
trying to say n-tier development, yes you can do multi-tier
development.  Web based development is the direction development is
taking on Unix and Windows. You might be good for you to get started
by learn PHP development for Apache.

Quote:> development environment.  Are there such things in C++ (If that is
what you
> guys suggest)?

Developer environments (IDE) aren't used very much in the Unix world.
There are a few, but most are pretty basic.  There are some for Java
that have more maturity than the non-Java ones.  In general get used
to make files and your editor of choice.

Quote:> 4. Are there any web based training courses available?  Red Hat has
some.  I
> somehow am not convinced with the value compared to its price.

I don't know anything about RH programming classes.  Check out your
local colleges they usually have extension classes in Unix and Unix
programming.

Good luck and remember to have fun.

Steve Barnette

 
 
 

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Paul Lutu » Sun, 01 Dec 2002 16:56:47



> ( u are pathetic )

u are a troll of no consequence. And u are about to become invisible.

*PLONK*

--
Paul Lutus
www.arachnoid.com

 
 
 

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Ash K » Mon, 02 Dec 2002 02:51:35


I want to thank you all for valuable input.  I think those are the kind of
pointers I was looking.

One clarification from me:
I meant to write III party components (Software libraries developed by other
vendors) instead of III part components.  Sorry about that.  In the Visual
Basic world, if I need to write a POP3 mail reader, I did not need to know
about how POP3 works, or even TCP/Ip for that matter.  Someone has already
done it.  I would have used this "III party component" to develop my mail
reader.  Most of these components give royalty free distribution.  So, my
question was, if developers in Linux environment do the same, or everyone
writes every thing from scratch (Which has its merits).

Once again.  Thank you very much for your time and input.

Regards.

AK

 
 
 

Getting started with Linux (Training suggestions???)

Post by Steve B » Mon, 02 Dec 2002 06:17:50



> I want to thank you all for valuable input.  I think those are the kind of
> pointers I was looking.

> One clarification from me:
> I meant to write III party components (Software libraries developed by
> other
> vendors) instead of III part components.  Sorry about that.  In the Visual
> Basic world, if I need to write a POP3 mail reader, I did not need to know
> about how POP3 works, or even TCP/Ip for that matter.  Someone has already
> done it.  I would have used this "III party component" to develop my mail
> reader.  Most of these components give royalty free distribution.  So, my
> question was, if developers in Linux environment do the same, or everyone
> writes every thing from scratch (Which has its merits).

> Once again.  Thank you very much for your time and input.

> Regards.

> AK

In general no, Unix programmers don't use 3rd party components.  But with
open source you have access to all sorts of code.  But it isn't going to be
packaged up like VB components to drag and drop into your app.  You're too
used to RAD development.  Now if you get into Perl there are many modules
that do many things like you are talking about, but Perl by default isn't
GUI. As I said things are very different, but you have many more choices.

Steve Barnette

 
 
 

1. Getting off the STABLE train to catch the 4.5-RELENG train, how?

I switched from the RELENG_4_4 (4.4-RELENG)  tag in cvsup to RELENG_4
(STABLE) some time back to try out some of the new features and some
fixes.

Now I'd like to get off the STABLE branch and back onto the 4.5-RELENG
branch (because the is my main server, and stability is important. How
do I accomplich this, and when should I do it?

Where can I find out what labels are available in cvsup? Given past
naming conventions I would guess I should use RELENG_4_5 as the cvsup
tag, but last time I tried it (a few days ago) it proceeded to delete
my entire source tree - presumably because the tag wasn't available
yet.

Thanks,
Daniel

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