Here is location of GNU pascal

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by Dan Min » Tue, 23 Jun 1992 23:26:16



        I got alot of people asking me where...?
Ok.

You can find it at kampi.hut.fi  in  jtv/gnu-pascal

It's a funny compiler and is in ultra-alpha testing.. :)
I just don't that the space to compile it, so I pass it to
anyone who will.  I may have to suffice with the p2c translating
program...

Dan "poor boy" Miner

--
 Dan Miner

Computer Science          
University of Missouri-Rolla             "It all begins with a glimmer."

 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by James Henricks » Fri, 26 Jun 1992 13:07:02



>    I got alot of people asking me where...?
>Ok.

>You can find it at kampi.hut.fi  in  jtv/gnu-pascal

>It's a funny compiler and is in ultra-alpha testing.. :)
>I just don't that the space to compile it, so I pass it to
>anyone who will.  I may have to suffice with the p2c translating
>program...

>Dan "poor boy" Miner

>--
> Dan Miner

>Computer Science          
>University of Missouri-Rolla             "It all begins with a glimmer."

If someone does compile it, will they please distribute it in .a form?  I
am slowly replacing a lot of broken programs that were linked with static
libraries or shared libs that don't exist anymore.  Distributing in .a
form should enable Linuxers to upgrade to newer kernels with less difficulty.

I've got another question.  (HELP!)  :-)  I have two or three sets of shared
libs and would like to recompile my programs so they only use the latest.  Is
there a way to find out which shared libs a program uses?  I'd hate to just
delete the old libs and find out the hard way.

--
Jim H.
*
* James L. Henrickson
* "Yet another Jim in the Linux world."  :-)

 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by Claude Mor » Sat, 27 Jun 1992 01:49:01



Quote:>I've got another question.  (HELP!)  :-)  I have two or three sets of shared
>libs and would like to recompile my programs so they only use the latest.  Is
>there a way to find out which shared libs a program uses?  I'd hate to just
>delete the old libs and find out the hard way.

There are two ways: any easy way and a difficult way.
(isn't that always the case? :-)

Difficult) run 'strings' on the executable you're investigating.  Somewhere
           you should see a string of the form "/lib/libxxxx", where "xxxx" is
           usually "92.04.06" or "c_v_11c".  If you're examining a shared
           executable, this string is most likely the name of the shared
           library.  Do this for *all* your executables (yecchh).  Note that
           you can always resort to 'less' if you don't have 'strings'.

Easy)      to avoid this problem in the future, retrieve the file 'ldd.tar.Z'
           from tsx-11.  If you follow the instructions, you'll be able to
           type "ldd <executable>" to (L)ist the (D)ynamic (D)ependencies of
           the executable.  In other words, 'ldd' prints the names of the
           shared libraries the executable needs.  'ldd' returns nothing
           for static executables.  Note that this won't work for executables
           linked before installation of 'ldd'; the results are unpredicatble.
           This means you can look forward to *another* spate of linking .a's.
           Enjoy :-)
---
Claude Morin
(that's "klode", NOT "clod"...French :-)
London, Ontario, Canada

 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by David Eng » Sat, 27 Jun 1992 02:15:00


:          for static executables.  Note that this won't work for executables
:          linked before installation of 'ldd'; the results are unpredicatble.
:          This means you can look forward to *another* spate of linking .a's.

One short note.  Recent versions of the compiler/libraries already
include support for ldd.  The only that needs to be installed is the
ldd program itself.

David
--
David Engel                        Optical Data Systems, Inc.

(214) 234-6400                     Richardson, TX  75081

 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by Al Cla » Sat, 27 Jun 1992 05:19:47



     [stuff deleted ]

Quote:

>I've got another question.  (HELP!)  :-)  I have two or three sets of shared
>libs and would like to recompile my programs so they only use the latest.  Is
>there a way to find out which shared libs a program uses?  I'd hate to just
>delete the old libs and find out the hard way.

>--
>Jim H.
>*
>* James L. Henrickson
>* "Yet another Jim in the Linux world."  :-)

I use "less" on the binary;  the library name is at byte 1152 decimal as
part of an error message "unable to find /lib/lib92.04.06" (for example).
This shows up about 2/3 of the way down the first page on an 80x25 page.
--

      *** Practice random kindness and senseless acts of beauty! ***
 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by Kevin Bro » Sat, 27 Jun 1992 07:18:37



[...]

Quote:>I've got another question.  (HELP!)  :-)  I have two or three sets of shared
>libs and would like to recompile my programs so they only use the latest.  Is
>there a way to find out which shared libs a program uses?  I'd hate to just
>delete the old libs and find out the hard way.

Yup.  Just move the shared libs elsewhere.  Make a directory, say, "oldlibs",
and move the shared libs into it.

Quote:>* James L. Henrickson
>* "Yet another Jim in the Linux world."  :-)

--
                                Kevin Brown



 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by A. V. Le Bla » Sat, 27 Jun 1992 22:15:45




>>Is
>>there a way to find out which shared libs a program uses?

>I use "less" on the binary;  the library name is at byte 1152 decimal as
>part of an error message "unable to find /lib/lib92.04.06" (for example).
>This shows up about 2/3 of the way down the first page on an 80x25 page.

Actually, there are two good ways of doing this:

(1)  Use ldd.  Disadvantages are that it doesn't work with early shared
     libraries, and that it sometimes aborts and dumps core.

(2)  Use 'egrep -l lib92.04.06 filenames'.  Disadvantages are error-prone
     typing and the off chance of getting a false positive.

     -- Owen

 
 
 

Here is location of GNU pascal

Post by Giles D Mal » Wed, 01 Jul 1992 12:27:58




Quote:>I have two or three sets of shared
>libs and would like to recompile my programs so they only use the latest.  Is
>there a way to find out which shared libs a program uses?  I'd hate to just
>delete the old libs and find out the hard way.

I hit this problem recently when I upgraded my compiler and wanted to recompile
all the old stuff that was using old shared libs. The following shell script is
what I finally resorted to (I use bash).

It will search *all* files for a match with the names of the files in /lib.
I did this as I wanted to find any reference, perhaps in source files, to the
old libs. It is a simple matter to change the `find' command to check only
executables.

Script outputs lines of the form $file<tab>$library
to stdout, so you can redirect / sort etc the output.
Note that the $file may appear more than once, such as if you compile
with the math libraries.

You may get some spurious output (such as I get /swapfile uses all the
shared libs), but at least it misses none (I hope !).

Hope it helps.

-----cut-----
#! /bin/sh
# libsused - Find modules using shared libs.
# Searches through *all* files except /usr/spool/news/*
# Put a -perms parm on the `find' command if you want to search
# only executables.
# Optional parms are to exclude listing files that use the given
# library (your latest libc.a ?) to cut down on noise.
# NOTE: Assumes all shared libraries are in /lib
#
# eg libsused -x libc_v2_11c

exclude=
if [ "$1" = "-x" ]
then
        exclude=/lib/$2
fi

set /lib/*
if [ "$1" = "$exclude" ]
then
        libs=$2
        shift
else
        libs=$1
fi
shift
findstr=$libs

while [ "$1" != "" ]
do
        if [ "$1" != "$exclude" ]
        then
                libs="$libs $1"
                findstr="$findstr|$1"
        fi
        shift
done

if [ "$libs" = "" ]
then
        echo "No libraries left to find." 1>&2
        exit 1
fi

for file in `find / -type f -a \
        \! -regex ^/usr/spool/news/\* \
        -exec egrep -l "$findstr" {} \;`
do
        for library in $libs
        do
                if `egrep -s $library $file`
                then
                        echo $file      $library
                fi
        done
done
exit 0
-----cut-----
--


 
 
 

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||  this  crazy  world full  of computers and  ||  \___________\  ||
||  defy nature in another way, ROLLER BLADE!  ||   (*)(*)(*)(*)  ||

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