HLA v1.39 (High Level Assembler) is now available for Linux

HLA v1.39 (High Level Assembler) is now available for Linux

Post by Randall Hyd » Sun, 14 Jul 2002 06:02:48



HLA v1.39, the High Level Assembler,  is now available for
Windows and Linux from Webster on the HLA Download
page (follow the Downloads link from http://webster.cs.ucr.edu).

HLA v1.39 changes:
Support for Unicode string and character literal constants.
New parameter passing features.
Faster compilation/assembly when using namespace (dramatically
reduces compile times for large include files, e.g., the Windows
and Linux include files).
New support for zero-terminated strings in the HLA Standard Library.
Several bug fixes.

---------------------------------------------------------------
General information about the High Level Assembler (HLA):
---------------------------------------------------------------
HLA, the High Level Assembler, is an x86 assembler that uses
a high level language-like syntax (based on Pascal, C, C++,
Ada, Modula-2, etc.).  HLA was designed to make learning
assembly language programming very easy for those who already
know how to program using a high level language like Pascal or C.

In addition to being great for beginners, HLA is an extrememly
powerful programming language with features far exceeding those
found in traditional assemblers like Gas, MASM, TASM, and NASM.

The HLA system includes the HLA standard library containing hundreds
of practical and useful functions for I/O (file and console I/O), string
manipulation, pattern matching, character set operations, array
manipulation, memory management, date/time calculations, math functions,
exception handling, and much more.

HLA is a public domain system and all source code is available
(including all the source code for the routines found in the
HLA Standard Library as well as the compiler itself).

HLA is available for both Linux and Windows (Win32).
Carefully written programs (i.e., those that use the HLA Standard
Library) will compile and run under either operating system
without change.

There are two editions of "The Art of Assembly Language
Programming" specifically written for HLA (both editions
are available on Webster).  "The Art of Assembly" is a
1,500-page introductory text on x86 assembly language
programming.

There are nearly 100,000 lines of example HLA source
code available on Webster.

For more details, check out HLA on Webster at http://webster.cs.ucr.edu
Randy Hyde

 
 
 

1. HLA v1.39 (the High Level Assembler) is now available for Linux

HLA v1.39, the High Level Assembler,  is now available for
Windows and Linux from Webster on the HLA Download
page (follow the Downloads link from http://webster.cs.ucr.edu).

HLA v1.39 changes:
Support for Unicode string and character literal constants.
New parameter passing features.
Faster compilation/assembly when using namespace (dramatically
reduces compile times for large include files, e.g., the Windows
and Linux include files).
New support for zero-terminated strings in the HLA Standard Library.
Several bug fixes.

---------------------------------------------------------------
General information about the High Level Assembler (HLA):
---------------------------------------------------------------
HLA, the High Level Assembler, is an x86 assembler that uses
a high level language-like syntax (based on Pascal, C, C++,
Ada, Modula-2, etc.).  HLA was designed to make learning
assembly language programming very easy for those who already
know how to program using a high level language like Pascal or C.

In addition to being great for beginners, HLA is an extrememly
powerful programming language with features far exceeding those
found in traditional assemblers like Gas, MASM, TASM, and NASM.

The HLA system includes the HLA standard library containing hundreds
of practical and useful functions for I/O (file and console I/O), string
manipulation, pattern matching, character set operations, array
manipulation, memory management, date/time calculations, math functions,
exception handling, and much more.

HLA is a public domain system and all source code is available
(including all the source code for the routines found in the
HLA Standard Library as well as the compiler itself).

HLA is available for both Linux and Windows (Win32).
Carefully written programs (i.e., those that use the HLA Standard
Library) will compile and run under either operating system
without change.

There are two editions of "The Art of Assembly Language
Programming" specifically written for HLA (both editions
are available on Webster).  "The Art of Assembly" is a
1,500-page introductory text on x86 assembly language
programming.

There are nearly 100,000 lines of example HLA source
code available on Webster.

For more details, check out HLA on Webster at http://webster.cs.ucr.edu
Randy Hyde

2. Slackware 1.1.2 installation report

3. HLA (High Level Assembler) is now available for Linux!

4. Setting up X?

5. HLA (High Level Assembler) Is Now Available for Linux!

6. ODBC drivers

7. HLA v1.33 for Linux is now available

8. Error Message That I can't Figure Out

9. HLA v1.38 is now available

10. HLA v1.37 Available

11. HLA v1.38 is now available

12. HLA v1.40 is now available

13. HLA v1.33 Is Now Available