Stupid, stupid question

Stupid, stupid question

Post by Joe Cipal » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 00:41:11



Hate to bother you folks,but, well, here goes.

I have over 12 yrs of Unix experience and several years of 'C'
experience. Problem is, none of it is in RAD (Rapid Application
Developemnt) or WIndows/GUI programming. I have had
very little C++ training as well.

I want to enhance my coding skills, which means learning
Object-oriented development. I want to learn C++ AND
Linux/Unix GUI skills. Can someone, anyone, recommend a
good book or two ro three that covers these topics?

Thank you in advance!

Joe Cipale

 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by John Hasle » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 01:32:57


Quote:Joe Cipale writes:
> I have over 12 yrs of Unix experience and several years of 'C'
> experience. Problem is, none of it is in RAD (Rapid Application
> Developemnt) or WIndows/GUI programming.

Not a problem.  It just means you have less to unlearn.

Quote:> I want to enhance my coding skills, which means learning Object-oriented
> development.

Learn Python.
--
John Hasler

Dancing Horse Hill
Elmwood, WI

 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by Pete Zaitc » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 04:40:03



> I want to enhance my coding skills, which means learning
> Object-oriented development. I want to learn C++ AND
> Linux/Unix GUI skills. [...]

I don't think it would be an "enhancement" to your skills if
you take the O-O bullshit too seriously. But by all means,
learn whatever you like to expand your horizons. Keep in mind
that true O-O and C++ do not match well, so if you are interested
in O-O you might want to learn something like Java or Python,
or some other less hyped language.

-- Pete

 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by Robert J. Hanse » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 06:14:17


Quote:> I want to enhance my coding skills, which means learning Object-oriented
> development. I want to learn C++ AND Linux/Unix GUI skills. Can someone,
> anyone, recommend a good book or two ro three that covers these topics?

The other people so far have recommended Python and decried C++, which
is... well, not answering your question at all.  :)  So let me give a pass
at it.

1.  Core C++ Programming.  O'Reilly Press.  Read this book, learn this
book, love this book.

2.  The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Edition.  Bjarne Stroustrup.  Once
you finish the O'Reilly book, read this one.  You don't need to understand
everything in it, but at least skim it.  You'll find yourself referring to
it again and again as you write your C++ code.

3.  Programming Qt.  Matthias Kalle Dallheimer.  O'Reilly Press.  This one
will get you started with the Qt toolkit, which is a *fantastic*
cross-platform C++ toolkit.  Qt is also the basis for KDE.

4.  KDE 2.0 Development, David Sweet, Sam's Publishing.  A surprisingly
good overview of how to develop for the KDE desktop.

5.  The Gtk-- project, at gtkmm.sourceforge.net.  Good (stunningly good,
IMO) C++ bindings for the GTK+ toolkit.  I've completely given up on the C
bindings for GTK+ after using Gtk--.

... That said, I do encourage you to learn Python somewhere along the
line.  It is a wonderful language.  I do most of my programming in C++ and
Python, but I really don't have any truck with those who say "oh, you want
to use /this/ language instead of that one".  Use whatever language
appeals to you.  Have fun.  That's the most important thing.  :)

 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by Joe Cipal » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 07:47:12




Quote:> > I want to enhance my coding skills, which means learning Object-oriented
> > development. I want to learn C++ AND Linux/Unix GUI skills. Can someone,
> > anyone, recommend a good book or two ro three that covers these topics?

> The other people so far have recommended Python and decried C++, which
> is... well, not answering your question at all.  :)  So let me give a pass
> at it.

> 1.  Core C++ Programming.  O'Reilly Press.  Read this book, learn this
> book, love this book.

Will look for this one tonight at B&N...

Quote:

> 2.  The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Edition.  Bjarne Stroustrup.  Once
> you finish the O'Reilly book, read this one.  You don't need to understand
> everything in it, but at least skim it.  You'll find yourself referring to
> it again and again as you write your C++ code.

Got this one at home. Picked it up (1st edition) when I was working for
Mentor Graphics.

Quote:

> 3.  Programming Qt.  Matthias Kalle Dallheimer.  O'Reilly Press.  This one
> will get you started with the Qt toolkit, which is a *fantastic*
> cross-platform C++ toolkit.  Qt is also the basis for KDE.

WIll look for this one as well...
Quote:

> 4.  KDE 2.0 Development, David Sweet, Sam's Publishing.  A surprisingly
> good overview of how to develop for the KDE desktop.

Hmmmm... Might be a good secondary resource, although I prefer either mwm
or fvwm. Still, one must know the standards.

Quote:> 5.  The Gtk-- project, at gtkmm.sourceforge.net.  Good (stunningly good,
> IMO) C++ bindings for the GTK+ toolkit.  I've completely given up on the C
> bindings for GTK+ after using Gtk--.

> ... That said, I do encourage you to learn Python somewhere along the
> line.  It is a wonderful language.  I do most of my programming in C++ and
> Python, but I really don't have any truck with those who say "oh, you want
> to use /this/ language instead of that one".  Use whatever language
> appeals to you.  Have fun.  That's the most important thing.  :)

Thanks for the help, Robert! This has been good reading.

Joe Cipale

 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by bowma » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 11:17:29



> Got this one at home. Picked it up (1st edition) when I was working for
> Mentor Graphics.

Hate to break the bad news, but the 1st Edition is mostly a historical
artifact at this point. Go for the 3rd.
 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by Robert J. Hanse » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 15:10:56


Quote:>> 1.  Core C++ Programming.  O'Reilly Press.  Read this book, learn this
>> book, love this book.

> Will look for this one tonight at B&N...

It's definitely a beginner's book.  Don't expect it to be more than that,
because it's not.  It is, however, probably the best introductory C++ book
out there.

Quote:>> 2.  The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Edition.  Bjarne Stroustrup.

> Got this one at home. Picked it up (1st edition) when I was working for
> Mentor Graphics.

Buy the 3rd edition.  1st and 2nd Eds were pre-C++97 (the ISO spec).  3rd
Ed is post-C++97, and covers the C++97 spec.  If you're going to learn the
innards of C++, then learn the spec, *not* some pre-spec implementation.
 
 
 

Stupid, stupid question

Post by Ken Sodeman » Sun, 30 Dec 2001 00:10:06



>> I want to enhance my coding skills, which means learning Object-oriented
>> development. I want to learn C++ AND Linux/Unix GUI skills. Can someone,
>> anyone, recommend a good book or two ro three that covers these topics?

> The other people so far have recommended Python and decried C++, which
> is... well, not answering your question at all.  :)

Not only that, but it is just plain silly, and often just wrong-headed
parrotting of things they have heard others say....

Anyhow, I would add to the list of books:
C++ FAQ's by Marshal Kline
Any of the Meyer's books (Effective C++, Even More Effective C++, etc.)

These are excellent books once you have learned the syntax.  What they will
not teach you the language.  What they will teach you is the proper
application of the language (IOW, proper technique and style).  After all,
just like C, C++ gives you all the rope you need to hang yourself, and then
some (which is one of the few totally valid criticisms I have heard of the
language).

--
Ken Sodemann

http://www.execpc.com/~stuffle
NASCAR fan, Packer fan | Go #17, #19, #20, #24, #26, #97 | Go Pack!!