mkisofs

mkisofs

Post by Friedel Loing » Thu, 21 Nov 1996 04:00:00



I installed mkisofs-1.05 on both Linux and SunOS.

1.)
I noticed that mkisofs does not care how many files there are in a
subdirectory. But I once I had a directory-tree, where one of the
subdirectories contained > 4500 files. I did'nt get any warning during
preparing the iso-image, or when I used cdwrite for writing to the
CD-recorder.
But then the disc was unreadable in our CDROM-readers. The only
possibility to see the stored files was, to mount the CD-recorder in Linux
as a CD-reader. It seems that the CD-recorder has more memory than
the normal CD-readers, so that the system is able to see the files.
It is very important for me to know, what the maximal number of files
should be.

2.)
I did'nt succeed to use the '-i' option. Can you please give me an
example? Is it possible to add files to an existing iso-image and how?

3.)
How does 'mkisofs -l' handle filenames > 32 characters ?
Are the names shorten to 32 characters?

4.)
I tried to the options '-P' '-p', but how can I read this information
afterwards either in Linux or in Sun?

Thanks in advance for your help.

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mkisofs

Post by Jac Goudsmi » Thu, 21 Nov 1996 04:00:00




Quote:> I noticed that mkisofs does not care how many files there are in a
> subdirectory. But I once I had a directory-tree, where one of the
> subdirectories contained > 4500 files. I did'nt get any warning during
> preparing the iso-image, or when I used cdwrite for writing to the
> CD-recorder.
> But then the disc was unreadable in our CDROM-readers. The only
> possibility to see the stored files was, to mount the CD-recorder in Linux
> as a CD-reader. It seems that the CD-recorder has more memory than
> the normal CD-readers, so that the system is able to see the files.
> It is very important for me to know, what the maximal number of files
> should be.

I'm not exactly familiar with ISO-9660 standard so I don't know what the
limit (if any) is. I saw somewhere that it's unwise to put more than about
100 files in a directory, as it can take (inefficient) search programs
several minutes to retrieve large directories, because the operating system
needs to read each sector of the directory which can take a long time in some
cases.

I would expect that long directories aren't really a technical problem: I'd
think if they can extend across more than one sector (and they can), there
would be no limit to the total length. On the other hand if the software you
are using (or the operating system) reserves a specific amount of memory
space, it's possible that it runs out and gives an error. The memory capacity
of the recorder or CD-ROM drive is not an issue: they don't know anything
about ISO-9660 and directory structures - they just read sectors off the
disc.

If you mount a CD with SunOS, make sure the file system type is "hsfs" as in
"mount -t hsfs -o ro /dev/sr0 /cdrom". Otherwise, the disc will be
unreadable. In Linux, the file system type should be "iso9660" as in "mount
-t iso9660 -r /dev/cdrom /cdrom". Maybe that's the problem.

Quote:> How does 'mkisofs -l' handle filenames > 32 characters ?
> Are the names shorten to 32 characters?

No. The names are stored in a different way (I think it's called ISO level
II). I know from experience that Windows 95 and Amiga support this format.
It's not compatible with most other systems (including MS-DOS) I think.

What you should use for Unix is the Rock Ridge format (-R option). In that
case the file names are stored in a short 8.3 form but RR-enabled systems
(including Linux, SunOS, Windows NT - not Win95, Macintosh) can read the long
file names. This format also includes provisions for Unix-style access rights
and file-system links.

Quote:> I tried to the options '-P' '-p', but how can I read this information
> afterwards either in Linux or in Sun?

The Publisher and Preparer information is stored in the Table Of Contents
sector at sector 16(?) of the image (run a grep or hexdump and you'll find
the exact location). In Unix you can use the raw device to read sectors
directly off the CD, similar to "dd if=/dev/sr0 of=toc.sector bs=2048 skip=16
count=1" (I didn't try this but it won't hurt).

============================================================================
Jac Goudsmit
CD-i & PC Software Engineer
Codim Interactive Media CV
Eindhoven, The Netherlands
http://www.codim.nl


All unsolicited commercial E-mails to the above addresses will not be
read beyond the subject line and will be bounced to your postmaster.
============================================================================

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Richard Wat » Fri, 22 Nov 1996 04:00:00





>says...
[snip]
>We found this to be a problem with DOS based systems. If DOS sees more
>than 100 files in a directory it starts to gag.

 I think this may be in violation of ISO9660 - I have a vague
recollection of circa. 200 files/directory as the limit.

[snip]

Quote:

>> No. The names are stored in a different way (I think it's called ISO level
>> II). I know from experience that Windows 95 and Amiga support this format.
>> It's not compatible with most other systems (including MS-DOS) I think.

>ISO Level 2 gets you aup to 32 characters.

 .. and Joliet on '95/NT gets you up to 64 unicode characters or
128 non-unicode ones. However, if it can't find a Joliet SVD,
Win95 seems to happily use the PVD quite liberally - eg. you can
have files with two extensions and the like on the PVD, and
'95 won't blink.
 You can probably push the PVD further and make it go mixed-case
and up to 64 characters if you're feeling adventurous, but more
systems are likely to break if you do...

Quote:>Again, we found that Win95 may
>or may not read a Level 2 disc depending on phase of the moon, day of the
>week, elephant stampedes in Zambia...

 On our system, it depended on the drivers: if you're using real-mode
(ie. non-long-filename-aware, almost by definition) drivers,
ISO level II disks won't read (actually, on our drive they would,
but you got duplicate filenames in DIRs, and trying to access data
was a total nightmare). If you have protected-mode drivers which
use the long-filename API functions, Level II should work.

Quote:

>> What you should use for Unix is the Rock Ridge format (-R option). In that
>> case the file names are stored in a short 8.3 form but RR-enabled systems
>> (including Linux, SunOS, Windows NT - not Win95, Macintosh) can read the long
>> file names. This format also includes provisions for Unix-style access rights
>> and file-system links.

>NT cannot read Rock Ridge extensions. RR adds POSIX stuff and NT is not a
>POSIX compliant OS.

 That doesn't really matter - it could do the best it could. Joliet and
RR aren't mutually incompatible, but I have yet to find a program that
can write a mixed Joliet/RR disk. I might get around to writing one
some day ... (before you ask, hacking mkisofs is a non-starter -
it really doesn't like the idea of writing an SVD as well as its
PVD. You could probably hack it if you had a copy of iso9660, but I
don't).

 FWIW, our NT 4.0 boxen can't read Rock Ridge.

Richard.
PS. You can get the Joliet spec from
http://www.ms4music.com/devl/jolspec.htm and there's a Linux patch
for Joliet CDs at
http://www-plateau.cs.berkeley.edu/people/chaffee/joliet.html
--
'I can't think of a decent rhyme for elephant, so we'd better not set fire
  to any of those'
The University of Cambridge can't have these opinions even if it wants them.

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Robert J. Brashe » Fri, 22 Nov 1996 04:00:00



says...

Quote:> I'm not exactly familiar with ISO-9660 standard so I don't know what the
> limit (if any) is. I saw somewhere that it's unwise to put more than about
> 100 files in a directory, as it can take (inefficient) search programs
> several minutes to retrieve large directories, because the operating system
> needs to read each sector of the directory which can take a long time in some
> cases.

We found this to be a problem with DOS based systems. If DOS sees more
than 100 files in a directory it starts to gag.

Quote:> > How does 'mkisofs -l' handle filenames > 32 characters ?
> > Are the names shorten to 32 characters?

> No. The names are stored in a different way (I think it's called ISO level
> II). I know from experience that Windows 95 and Amiga support this format.
> It's not compatible with most other systems (including MS-DOS) I think.

ISO Level 2 gets you aup to 32 characters. Again, we found that Win95 may
or may not read a Level 2 disc depending on phase of the moon, day of the
week, elephant stampedes in Zambia...

Quote:> What you should use for Unix is the Rock Ridge format (-R option). In that
> case the file names are stored in a short 8.3 form but RR-enabled systems
> (including Linux, SunOS, Windows NT - not Win95, Macintosh) can read the long
> file names. This format also includes provisions for Unix-style access rights
> and file-system links.

NT cannot read Rock Ridge extensions. RR adds POSIX stuff and NT is not a
POSIX compliant OS.

--

Technical Services Manager        phone:  612-374-4643
The One-Off CD Shop Minneapolis     fax:  612-374-3901

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Andrey V Khavryutchenk » Fri, 22 Nov 1996 04:00:00





> > How does 'mkisofs -l' handle filenames > 32 characters ?
> > Are the names shorten to 32 characters?

> No. The names are stored in a different way (I think it's called ISO level
> II). I know from experience that Windows 95 and Amiga support this format.
> It's not compatible with most other systems (including MS-DOS) I think.

Does this means, that CD, written under Win95 with long filenames is
unreadable
by Linux?  If yes, are there plans to provide that option?

SY
--
Andrey V Khavryutchenko

Interests: Computational Chemistry, OOA&OOP, The Net

Quote of the week:
        There are no answers, only cross-references.

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Jac Goudsmi » Sat, 23 Nov 1996 04:00:00



> What you should use for Unix is the Rock Ridge format (-R option). In that
> case the file names are stored in a short 8.3 form but RR-enabled systems
> (including Linux, SunOS, Windows NT - not Win95, Macintosh) can read the
long
> file names. This format also includes provisions for Unix-style access
rights
> and file-system links.

As some people already pointed out, Windows NT cannot read RR discs. I was
misinformed (most of the other things were true though :-) Sorry about that.

Anyway the start of the sentence was what I wanted to say: for *UNIX* you
should use RR. (I suppose if you want to make a disc that runs on more than
one platform at once, ISO9660 is the way to go: no long-name format can be
read by all platforms).

============================================================================
Jac Goudsmit
CD-i & PC Software Engineer
Codim Interactive Media CV
Eindhoven, The Netherlands
http://www.codim.nl


All unsolicited commercial E-mails to the above addresses will not be
read beyond the subject line and will be bounced to your postmaster.
============================================================================

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Francois Baliga » Sat, 23 Nov 1996 04:00:00



>>Again, we found that Win95 may
>>or may not read a Level 2 disc depending on phase of the moon, day of the
>>week, elephant stampedes in Zambia...

> On our system, it depended on the drivers: if you're using real-mode
>(ie. non-long-filename-aware, almost by definition) drivers,
>ISO level II disks won't read (actually, on our drive they would,
>but you got duplicate filenames in DIRs, and trying to access data
>was a total nightmare). If you have protected-mode drivers which
>use the long-filename API functions, Level II should work.

        well something similar... Apparently Windows'95 got
        troubles with multisession disk sometime... sometime you
        see the disc correctly (last session) and sometime you only
        see the first session :)   maybe it's related to the
        temperature.. i should make tests ;)

        config: win95 french (+service pack 1 french)
        cdrom: ide cdrom samsung 8x
        driver: standard pmode 32bit win95 ide cdrom drivers

        regards, Francois Baligant

 .---- -- - ------ -- -- - - - ---- -- --- --- - ------- ---- --.

: -------------------------------------------------------------- :
:                http://www.pctrading.be/antares                 :
:              ftp://cubic.pctrading.be/pub/ketchup/             :
:                          Wired organizer                       :
:  edge.of.delight BBS - 50% control 50% chaos - +32-2-375.5651  :
`.___ _ __ ___ _ __ ___ _______ __ _ ____ _ ___ _ ___ _ _ __ __ .'

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Jac Goudsmi » Tue, 26 Nov 1996 04:00:00







> > > How does 'mkisofs -l' handle filenames > 32 characters ?
> > > Are the names shorten to 32 characters?

> > No. The names are stored in a different way (I think it's called ISO
level
> > II). I know from experience that Windows 95 and Amiga support this
format.
> > It's not compatible with most other systems (including MS-DOS) I think.

> Does this means, that CD, written under Win95 with long filenames is
> unreadable
> by Linux?  If yes, are there plans to provide that option?

I'm not sure about Linux... Sorry.

============================================================================
Jac Goudsmit
CD-i & PC Software Engineer
Codim Interactive Media CV
Eindhoven, The Netherlands
http://www.codim.nl


All unsolicited commercial E-mails to the above addresses will not be
read beyond the subject line and will be bounced to your postmaster.
============================================================================

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Robert J. Brashe » Tue, 26 Nov 1996 04:00:00



COMMERCIAL-EMAIL-PLEASE says...

Quote:

> > Does this means, that CD, written under Win95 with long filenames is
> > unreadable
> > by Linux?  If yes, are there plans to provide that option?

> I'm not sure about Linux... Sorry.

There is an alpha patch to mkisofs available for writing Joliet discs. We
have not tried it yet.

Linux will see truncated file name with that ~1 concoction.

--

Technical Services Manager        phone:  612-374-4643
The One-Off CD Shop Minneapolis     fax:  612-374-3901

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Dale Qui » Tue, 26 Nov 1996 04:00:00






>>says...
>[snip]
[snip]
> That doesn't really matter - it could do the best it could. Joliet and
>RR aren't mutually incompatible, but I have yet to find a program that
>can write a mixed Joliet/RR disk. I might get around to writing one
>some day ... (before you ask, hacking mkisofs is a non-starter -

CDR-Publisher claims this as one of it's features.  See
www.cdr1.com for additional information.

--
- Dale
"I don't think math is a science, I think it's a religion." - Calvin (&Hobbes)

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Andrey V Khavryutchenk » Wed, 27 Nov 1996 04:00:00




> COMMERCIAL-EMAIL-PLEASE says...

> > > Does this means, that CD, written under Win95 with long filenames is
> > > unreadable
> > > by Linux?  If yes, are there plans to provide that option?

> > I'm not sure about Linux... Sorry.

> There is an alpha patch to mkisofs available for writing Joliet discs. We
> have not tried it yet.

Well... And what about reading? And, anyway, where it is?  url, pls...

Quote:> Linux will see truncated file name with that ~1 concoction.

Good enough...

SY
--
Andrey V Khavryutchenko

Interests: Computational Chemistry, OOA&OOP, The Net

Quote of the week:
        There are no answers, only cross-references.

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Sylvan Butl » Fri, 06 Dec 1996 04:00:00



: > There is an alpha patch to mkisofs available for writing Joliet discs. We
: > have not tried it yet.

: Well... And what about reading? And, anyway, where it is?  url, pls...

http://www-plateau.cs.berkeley.edu/people/chaffee/joliet.html

sdb
--

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. --Benjamin Franklin, 1759
 "Don't Tread On Me!"

 
 
 

mkisofs

Post by Andrey V Khavryutchenk » Sat, 21 Dec 1996 04:00:00




> : > There is an alpha patch to mkisofs available for writing Joliet discs. We
> : > have not tried it yet.

> : Well... And what about reading? And, anyway, where it is?  url, pls...

> http://www-plateau.cs.berkeley.edu/people/chaffee/joliet.html

Uhh... Thanks.   Finally I've managed to download and install it.
I've been able to read one of my Joliet disks.  

But another one is written with 'interleaved files'.  

What does that means?  

Are there plans to put their support to the linux kernel?

Where I can read about them?  

I've did the altavista search, but found nothing usefull about
interleaved files and only few pages, describing iso9660 format.

SY,
--
Andrey V Khavryutchenko

Interests: Computational Chemistry, OOA&OOP, The Net

The Murphy Philosophy:  Smile. Tommorrow will be worse.

 
 
 

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distribution
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thanks,
-fared-

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