Fed up with WROX

Fed up with WROX

Post by wwe.. » Wed, 02 Sep 1998 04:00:00



If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

Ware! It looks impressive, but if you want to do anything past the examples,
this book falls silent.

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by David M. Co » Wed, 02 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
>throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
>2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

This is an excellent book, IMO.  It covers quite a bit, yet covers most of
it very well.  It does assume, however, that the reader has already mastered
C.

Yours is the first negative comment I've seen.

You can also find reviews at amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1874416680/002-4381763-1400625

Do you have any specific criticisms?

Dave Cook

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Jeev » Wed, 02 Sep 1998 04:00:00



>If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
>throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
>2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

>Ware! It looks impressive, but if you want to do anything past the examples,
>this book falls silent.

You know, it's funny you should dislike WROX...I have a WROX book called _The
Revolutionary Guide to Assembly Language_, and it's by far the *weirdest*
programming book I've ever read. It forward-references itself so much that in
order to read the book and understand it, you already have to know assembly
language. The first chapter presents a 500 line BAT file for DOS that parses
assembly source files and decides what assembler/linker to use! The book is
*huge*, and the only useful feature is a detailed reference to all the DOS and
BIOS interrupts in the back. It was written by four guys from Moscow of whom
I've never heard, and the whole book is just bizzare. For example, it has
constant glue code for the Clipper language, whatever tf that's about.

I guess WROX just publishes weird (bad?) stuff...

My $.01...

-- Jeeves

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Erik de Castro Lop » Wed, 02 Sep 1998 04:00:00




> >If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
> >throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
> >2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

> This is an excellent book, IMO.  It covers quite a bit, yet covers most of
> it very well.  It does assume, however, that the reader has already mastered
> C.

Seconded.
--
+-------------------------------------------------+

+-------------------------------------------------+
"Usenet is like a herd of performing elephants with diarrhea;
massive, difficult to redirect, awe-inspiring, entertaining,
and a source of mind-boggling amounts of excrement when you
least expect it."
 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Lawrence Troxle » Wed, 02 Sep 1998 04:00:00


: If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
: throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
: 2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

: Ware! It looks impressive, but if you want to do anything past the examples,
: this book falls silent.

Huh? It's the best book I've found so far on the subject. What,
specifically did you find wrong with it?

Larry

--

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Steve Hutt » Thu, 03 Sep 1998 04:00:00





>> >If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
>> >throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
>> >2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

>> This is an excellent book, IMO.  It covers quite a bit, yet covers most of
>> it very well.  It does assume, however, that the reader has already mastered
>> C.

>Seconded.
>--

I agree as well - an outstanding book, IMHO.  Clear examples,
and coverage of tons of stuff in detail.  Well-written.  This
is the book I'd recommend to anyone who knows C and is just
getting into coding under Linux.

Steve

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Greg Herlei » Thu, 03 Sep 1998 04:00:00



> If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd

<snip>

I disagree.  I think it's a great into for an experienced C programmer
just coming into the Linux/Unix world.  I recommend it heartily -
and whatsmore, the people I have recommended it to have loved it and
found it very useful.

I suspect that you might have been expecting more from it... but,
the title starts with "Beginning" after all.

Can you provide some concrete examples why you don't like it?  You mentioned
that going beyond the examples proved difficult - in what way?

Greg
(who has NOTHING to do with WROX)

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Ken Sodema » Thu, 03 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>I agree as well - an outstanding book, IMHO.  Clear examples,
>and coverage of tons of stuff in detail.  Well-written.  This
>is the book I'd recommend to anyone who knows C and is just
>getting into coding under Linux.

How well does "Beginning Linux Programming" compare to "Linux Application
Developement" by Johnon & Troan?  I am wanting to get a book on Linux
programming, and just want some opinions on these two (or any others that
people like).

Just for background, I am an experiances software engineer who is familiar
mostly with C, C++, Pascal, and Ada, but my Unix developement experiance
is a little light (I have been doing some stuff with GTK+, but that is
about it).  I am looking for a book that covers both the tools (make,
RCS, gcc, etc.), as well as a book that covers subjects like interfacing
with the kernel, the system libs, signal processing, sockets, job control,
etc....

It looks like both of the books mentioned above would fit the bill, and I
will probably end up getting both of them sooner or later.  Still, any
suggestions on which to look at first, or even other books that may fit
the bill would be appreciated.

Thanks;

--

http://www.pcii.net/~stuffel
NASCAR fan, Packer fan | Go #23, #24, #36 | Go Pack!!

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Matthew Busigi » Thu, 03 Sep 1998 04:00:00


: If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
: throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
: 2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

: Ware! It looks impressive, but if you want to do anything past the examples,
: this book falls silent.

Whoa.  Steady there ;-)
I found that the particular book you are talking about is the best book to
get if you want to delve in to Linux programming!!  Would you care to
enlighten the group on why you don't like it?  I found it VERY useful..

        Regards,
                Matt
--

--
"Wake up and smell the penguin!"
xwing.org Debian/GNU Linux: 233.42 BogoMips

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Robert Wues » Fri, 04 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I'd recommend Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment by Stevens
together with the Wrox book, Beginning Linux Programming.  Together, you
have most info you'll need.  I have Linux Application Development,
also.  It mostly sits unused when the other two books are around.



> >I agree as well - an outstanding book, IMHO.  Clear examples,
> >and coverage of tons of stuff in detail.  Well-written.  This
> >is the book I'd recommend to anyone who knows C and is just
> >getting into coding under Linux.

> How well does "Beginning Linux Programming" compare to "Linux Application
> Developement" by Johnon & Troan?  I am wanting to get a book on Linux
> programming, and just want some opinions on these two (or any others that
> people like).

> Just for background, I am an experiances software engineer who is familiar
> mostly with C, C++, Pascal, and Ada, but my Unix developement experiance
> is a little light (I have been doing some stuff with GTK+, but that is
> about it).  I am looking for a book that covers both the tools (make,
> RCS, gcc, etc.), as well as a book that covers subjects like interfacing
> with the kernel, the system libs, signal processing, sockets, job control,
> etc....

> It looks like both of the books mentioned above would fit the bill, and I
> will probably end up getting both of them sooner or later.  Still, any
> suggestions on which to look at first, or even other books that may fit
> the bill would be appreciated.

> Thanks;

> --

> http://www.pcii.net/~stuffel
> NASCAR fan, Packer fan | Go #23, #24, #36 | Go Pack!!

--
Robert Wuest, PE             Empowered
Sirius Engineering Company          by

http://www.salonmagazine.com/21st/feature/1998/06/cov_26feature.html

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by David M. Co » Fri, 04 Sep 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>How well does "Beginning Linux Programming" compare to "Linux Application
>Developement" by Johnon & Troan?  I am wanting to get a book on Linux
>programming, and just want some opinions on these two (or any others that
>people like).

I find the books more complementary than finding one better than the other.
For instance LAD covers Berkeley db and SLang whereas BLP covers gdbm and
ncurses.  BLP also has a good chapter on BASH and nice reviews of Tcl/Tk,
HTML and CGI.  LAD has better coverage of creating libraries and a really
cool chapter on debugging dynamic memory allocation.  Despite the title, LAD
seems stronger on system programming than BLP; the main example code in the
LAD book is an implementation of a simple shell (ladsh).

If you are more interested in coverage of tools, you might look at the
O'Reilly _Programming with GNU Software_ book.

Quote:>about it).  I am looking for a book that covers both the tools (make,
>RCS, gcc, etc.), as well as a book that covers subjects like interfacing
>with the kernel, the system libs, signal processing, sockets, job control,
>etc....

O'Reilly's _Linux Device Drivers_ would probably be a better place to look
for info on interfacing with the kernel.

So many books, so little time.

Dave Cook

 
 
 

Fed up with WROX

Post by Alasta » Sat, 05 Sep 1998 04:00:00




>>If that WROX pulication _Beginning_Linux_Programming_ weren't so big I'd
>>throw it across the room. Many trees died in vain to put that next-to-useless
>>2 1/2 linear inches on the shelves.

>>Ware! It looks impressive, but if you want to do anything past the examples,
>>this book falls silent.

I'd have to disagree with both of you. This is one of the best introductory unix
programming books around IMHO.

--

Alastair