IBM takeover of Sun - Say it ain't so !

IBM takeover of Sun - Say it ain't so !

Post by Anil T Maliyek » Sat, 22 Aug 1998 04:00:00



: It *is* the number one selling RISC computer (as opposed to embedded) chip in the
: world.  I think this has a lot to do with some of IBM's failures.  They hype things
: and tout them as something they are not to the press.  By any other standard,
: PowerPC is a huge success.  When they go and say it will be serious competition to
: Intel they look like fools.  My fear is that they will cut back on it because it
: failed to live up to that impossible standard.  PowerPC is a wonderful product that
: is creating a nice little niche and they should stick with it.  I'd love it if
: IBM/Motorola embraced the geek community and started marketing low cost dual
: powerpc motherboards, just to get the technology into people's hands, even if only
: a small segment buys them.

: At one point in the game, OS/2 was a money maker.  It was creating a niche and then
: they said it was going to take over the windows market and looked like fools.

: OpenDoc's biggest problem was that too many people were talking and not enough were
: coding, it was the second coming in print and when it was all said and done it
: wasn't enough even though it was great technology and could have made a serious
: impact if they played the media games differently.

OpenDoc had other problems.  It simply was too complex and required too
many things to be written properly in order to work together properly.

: IBM is a simple company to understand.  There are a lot of people who work on a lot
: of different products and there goal is singular: make lots of money.  Once you
: realize that, you will understand that IBM is IBM's biggest enemy many times,
: shooting itself in the foot (PC Co (er PSG) not preloading OS/2 or using PowerPC,
: PSP porting to Solaris and not AIX, etc..)
: You try and mix that with a company like MS or Apple that is unified behind a
: product and things don't always work out correctly.  It's ironic that there are the
: rumors of IBM getting into the linux business and so many people see that as a good
: thing, I think it would be great for the company and open a lot of doors linux
: would never get behind on its own but with IBM's history...

IBM's problem was that they were product and technology focussed and
not market and solution focussed.  The result was that a lot fiefdoms
built around allegiences to technologies and products formed, creating
a lot of unnecessary conflict and redundant development.  They are
only beginning to try and solve those problems.  They still have a ways
to go though.  Ironically, the same problems are starting to appear
at Microsoft as it becomes larger.  

: Personally, I think Apple has done wonderfully from the PowerPC alliance.  They are
: gaining marketshare, cutting a profit,  and have a nice roadmap to the future.
: The company will survive and their products will continue to set standards.  They
: have single handedly made PowerPC the second top selling chip (for computers...)

Second top selling architecture.  Arguable the x86 clone makers sell more
chips.  But even still, I wouldn't give all the credit to Apple.  A lot
of Apple's success has to do with IBM and Motorola's design talent and
process technology.  

Anil

 
 
 

IBM takeover of Sun - Say it ain't so !

Post by Robato Y » Sat, 22 Aug 1998 04:00:00




>: It *is* the number one selling RISC computer (as opposed to embedded) chip in the
>: world.  I think this has a lot to do with some of IBM's failures.  They hype things
>: and tout them as something they are not to the press.  By any other standard,
>: PowerPC is a huge success.  When they go and say it will be serious competition to
>: Intel they look like fools.  My fear is that they will cut back on it because it
>: failed to live up to that impossible standard.  PowerPC is a wonderful product that
>: is creating a nice little niche and they should stick with it.  I'd love it if
>: IBM/Motorola embraced the geek community and started marketing low cost dual
>: powerpc motherboards, just to get the technology into people's hands, even if only
>: a small segment buys them.

They nearly did.  IBM had RS/6000 OEM and Motorola always had OEM on
their PowerPC Embedded, PReP/AIX, and Mac clone motherboards.  

But it costs plenty.  A Motorola MTX mobo with a 200MHz 604e in early
1997 sets you about $1800, although it had a lot of integrated I/O
included.   (But still enough to let you build an AIX workstation for
under $2,500) with a two user license on the OS.   The mobo would fit on
an ATX case.  

My feeling with the embedded PowerPC market is that it may take off.  I
got a $16,000 new Xerox Digital Copier that supports scanning, scanning
and network printing.  That thing alone may have about two or three
200MHz 603e's.  Xerox machines used to use MicroSparcs.  

Quote:

>: At one point in the game, OS/2 was a money maker.  It was creating a niche and then
>: they said it was going to take over the windows market and looked like fools.

>: OpenDoc's biggest problem was that too many people were talking and not enough were
>: coding, it was the second coming in print and when it was all said and done it
>: wasn't enough even though it was great technology and could have made a serious
>: impact if they played the media games differently.

>OpenDoc had other problems.  It simply was too complex and required too
>many things to be written properly in order to work together properly.

This is not how it really was just before it had its head cut off.
Surprisingly, OpenDoc 1.2 (the very last version of OpenDOC in MacOS 8)
was a slim framework (about 2-3MB in overhead), and worked considerably
quite fast and very reliable.  It's last and only great application, the
*dog internet suite, is more reliable than the Mac versions of
Communicator and Internet Explorer.  

Quote:

>: IBM is a simple company to understand.  There are a lot of people who work on a lot
>: of different products and there goal is singular: make lots of money.  Once you
>: realize that, you will understand that IBM is IBM's biggest enemy many times,
>: shooting itself in the foot (PC Co (er PSG) not preloading OS/2 or using PowerPC,
>: PSP porting to Solaris and not AIX, etc..)
>: You try and mix that with a company like MS or Apple that is unified behind a
>: product and things don't always work out correctly.  It's ironic that there are the
>: rumors of IBM getting into the linux business and so many people see that as a good
>: thing, I think it would be great for the company and open a lot of doors linux
>: would never get behind on its own but with IBM's history...

>IBM's problem was that they were product and technology focussed and
>not market and solution focussed.  The result was that a lot fiefdoms
>built around allegiences to technologies and products formed, creating
>a lot of unnecessary conflict and redundant development.  They are
>only beginning to try and solve those problems.  They still have a ways
>to go though.  Ironically, the same problems are starting to appear
>at Microsoft as it becomes larger.  

>: Personally, I think Apple has done wonderfully from the PowerPC alliance.  They are
>: gaining marketshare, cutting a profit,  and have a nice roadmap to the future.
>: The company will survive and their products will continue to set standards.  They
>: have single handedly made PowerPC the second top selling chip (for computers...)

>Second top selling architecture.  Arguable the x86 clone makers sell more
>chips.  But even still, I wouldn't give all the credit to Apple.  A lot
>of Apple's success has to do with IBM and Motorola's design talent and
>process technology.  

Apple's maneuverings on the common PowerPC platform kept it pretty much
an  Apple dominated affair on the desktop, although in a way made sense
from their position since they never had a profitable business plan for
a common multiple OS open clonable platform.

IBM and Motorola had the brightest engineers, but their marketing is
moronic and their corporate backbone is built on jelly.

IBM and Motorola's greatest neglect now is that PowerPC Linux may now be
their greatest hope for a non Apple PowerPC desktop platform, just as
Linux helped Alpha desktop and small servers.  Ironically, clone-killer
Apple is the company that is also responsible for the most used Linux
variant on the PowerPC, MKLinux.  It's either that or or they
should sponsor BeOS.

Rgds,

Chris

(counting down from top 50 oxymorons...)
10.  Tight slacks  
9.   Definite maybe
8.   Pretty ugly
7.   Twelve-ounce pound cake
6.   Diet ice cream
5.   Rap music
4.  Working vacation  
3.  Exact estimate  
2.  Religious tolerance
And the NUMBER ONE top oxy-MORON
1.   Microsoft Works
---From the Top 50 Oxymorons (thanks to Richard Kennedy)

 
 
 

1. IBM takeover of Sun - Say it ain't so !

Apparently Sun's not denying it ... yet.

http://www.zdii.com/industry_list.asp?mode=news&doc_id=ZE202383&pic=y

'Sun Microsystems soars on IBM takeover rumor'

"IBM has made no secret of its intent to grow its business on the
Internet," said Don Collier, an analyst at ProLytix Corp. "Sun's Java
platform was made for the Internet. If it did happen, Sun would benefit
from IBM's enormous financial resources and IBM would benefit from Sun's
technical expertise."

--
m$-Hotmail: "Where do you want Sun Solaris to take you today ?"

Howard J. Smith        | Building a better world thru a micro$oft
                       | free environment with Java, Netscape and

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