Standardization ?

Standardization ?

Post by Arun Sharm » Thu, 13 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Linux lovers,

It seems to me that some of the user-unfriendliness of Linux springs
from the fact that there is no standard desktop or installation
procedure, which makes downloading a piece of software and editing the
Makefile, configuration, installing and running such a pain for the
novice.

Is there a "standard" desktop and an installation template, which
might use some GUI (Tcl/Tk ?) that all programs written for Linux are
going to follow, so that installation to could be as easy as clicking
on a couple of buttons ?

Has anyone tried writing a GUI based GNU autoconfigure ?

Some random thoughts..

        -Arun
--

 
 
 

Standardization ?

Post by Mats Andtback » Fri, 14 Mar 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>It seems to me that some of the user-unfriendliness of Linux springs

Linux is *not* user unfriendly. it's just picky about who it makes
friends with.

Quote:>from the fact that there is no standard desktop or installation
>procedure,

why'd you want a standard desktop? no matter which one you suggest,
i'll insist on using another because i like it better. installation
procedure? unpack, compile, throw the binaries and man pages where
they belong - how could it get any easier?

Quote:>which makes downloading a piece of software and editing the
>Makefile, configuration, installing and running such a pain for the
>novice.

pain teaches.
--
        "...it's all wrong
         but it's alright..."          -- Clapton

 
 
 

Standardization ?

Post by Christopher Bib » Fri, 14 Mar 1997 04:00:00



>Linux lovers,
>Is there a "standard" desktop and an installation template, which
>might use some GUI (Tcl/Tk ?) that all programs written for Linux are
>going to follow, so that installation to could be as easy as clicking
>on a couple of buttons ?

I'd have to say that Red Hat's RPMs come pretty close to this.  For
many users who don't know or don't care to bother, the RPM system
makes it trivial to install new packages, upgrade old ones, or remove
the ones you don't like.  Now I'm not saying its perfect, far from
it, but for the casual user it certainly improves the viability of
Linux.
--
Christopher Bibbs  |  "Do not disrupt my carefully controlled pattern of hype or

Lear IT Center     |     -- Kibo
 
 
 

Standardization ?

Post by Chris Spieg » Sat, 15 Mar 1997 04:00:00




Quote:> Linux lovers,

> It seems to me that some of the user-unfriendliness of Linux springs
> from the fact that there is no standard desktop or installation
> procedure, which makes downloading a piece of software and editing the
> Makefile, configuration, installing and running such a pain for the
> novice.

Hm. Never tried it, but from what I hear RPMs should do just that.  Red
Hat is probably best for the beginner (I prefer Slackware, but hey, to
each his own..:)

Quote:> Is there a "standard" desktop and an installation template, which
> might use some GUI (Tcl/Tk ?) that all programs written for Linux are
> going to follow, so that installation to could be as easy as clicking
> on a couple of buttons ?

Writing a RPM interface in tcl/tk shouldn't be too hard.  I personally
like being able to compile the stuff I dl.  I can fix what doesn't work,
or make things a little better.  But for the novice, your idea definately
has merit...
 --
  //   () __    _  _ _  _
 //   // //\\  // // \\//
//__ // // // //_//  //\\  

 
 
 

Standardization ?

Post by William Taylor Wilso » Sat, 15 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Excerpts from netnews.comp.os.linux.advocacy: 13-Mar-97 Re:

Quote:> I'd have to say that Red Hat's RPMs come pretty close to this.  For

Red Hat and Debian both have very good "package" programs that are
extremely capable at adding and installing PROGRAMS.  Unfortunately,
this sort of solution is more like Win95's "Add/Remove Programs" feature
(except that unlike the version in Win95, RPM works).  This is very good
for upgrading programs.  It brings more non-wizards into the Linux
world, and as far as I'm concerned, about the only thing Linux needs now
is USERS USERS USERS.  Unfortunately, installing the actual OS is not
simpler.  While computers come pre-installed with Win95 and devices
include Win95 drivers that install by the "insert disk and click OK"
method, Linux installs, kernel compiles, and device installation is much
more complex and still requires that users know things about their
computer.  Only when Linux comes pre-installed and available in stores
at about the level of the Macintosh, and more visible than OS/2 (in the
home market) will software developers begin to support it in a major way
(right now, the only "big-name" commercial developer that comes to mind
is Id Software the game company).  Not that there aren't other
commercial applications- far from it- but there's no Office 95 for Linux
(obviously) or even a Corel Office for Linux (though I bet they could
sell some), nor is there a Photoshop... granted similar software is
available, but it's not the "big name" brand...
 
 
 

Standardization ?

Post by Nathan Han » Sun, 16 Mar 1997 04:00:00





> > Linux lovers,

> > It seems to me that some of the user-unfriendliness of Linux springs
> > from the fact that there is no standard desktop or installation
> > procedure, which makes downloading a piece of software and editing the
> > Makefile, configuration, installing and running such a pain for the
> > novice.

This has been recognised. Check out www.kde.org and www.gnustep.org
which are two projects attempting to provide a linux/unix desktop.

Quote:> Hm. Never tried it, but from what I hear RPMs should do just that.  Red
> Hat is probably best for the beginner (I prefer Slackware, but hey, to
> each his own..:)

RPM's are nice.

Quote:> > Is there a "standard" desktop and an installation template, which
> > might use some GUI (Tcl/Tk ?) that all programs written for Linux are
> > going to follow, so that installation to could be as easy as clicking
> > on a couple of buttons ?

> Writing a RPM interface in tcl/tk shouldn't be too hard.  I personally
> like being able to compile the stuff I dl.  I can fix what doesn't work,
> or make things a little better.  But for the novice, your idea definately
> has merit...

Already been done. It's called "glint" and available from RedHat.

--
Open mind for a different view, and nothing else matters.

 
 
 

Standardization ?

Post by Jon Chey » Wed, 19 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>Writing a RPM interface in tcl/tk shouldn't be too hard.  I personally
>like being able to compile the stuff I dl.  I can fix what doesn't work,
>or make things a little better.  But for the novice, your idea definately
>has merit...

Is this not what Glint is already?

Jon

 
 
 

1. Standardization of HTTP MIB

An effort is underway to create an IETF standard for a MIB for HTTP.  If
you are interested in contributing to the technical discussion or
requirements, please see:

http://www.onramp.net/~cwk/http-mib/

Carl

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Carl W. Kalbfleisch           |                 Computers For Christ
 Senior Software Engineer    --+--              http://www.cforc.com/
 OnRAMP Technologies           |            
 http://www.onramp.net         |     http://rampages.onramp.net/~cwk/
----------------------------------------------------------------------

2. PPP server authentication problems

3. Standardization of HTTP-MIB...

4. Wintrolls on MSFT board (ot)

5. ftp standardization

6. UNIX Can't Find Parallel Port

7. HELP: Performance tuning / Standardisation

8. More missing includes [2/4]

9. /home and standardisation between Soloaris and Linux

10. Standardization of Procedures in the Data Center

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12. Standardization of Procedures in the Data Center

13. Kernel Bootup Messages Standardization: NEEDED!