This is why businesses should avoid windoze/unix/linux ...

This is why businesses should avoid windoze/unix/linux ...

Post by Linonu » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 16:31:47



After takin' a swig o' grog, Mike Byrns belched out this bit o' wisdom:

Quote:> The evolution of VMS already runs on Intel.  It's called Windows XP.  Quit
> whining about old OSs.  They are dead.  XP is VMS with a real GUI.  Ask the
> maker.

Yeah, ask him.  He's the guy grumbling in the corner about how Microsoft
screwed up his work.  Yeah, he's reallllly happy with the stability of
his "VMS" now.

Yeah, Bill Gates even has this guy fooled:

http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupdate/stories/main/0,14179,2819659,0...

   "So, even if XP is the sole survivor of the mid 2000's OS wars,  both
   concepts and code, not to mention the file structure of VMS will  live on
   for the foreseeable future. And to use an operation system that  is so
   friendly, rugged, dependable, with built-in help and an intuitive user
   interface, well, it just makes me happy. Actually, I see VMS  having a
   renaissance/revival that nary an operating system has ever  seen.  VMS on
   a notebook...I'm counting the days..."

I'm actually going to cross post this to COLA, so the VMS users can
read this stuff.

And Bill gates was happy to "steal" VMS concepts:

http://www.melbournelinux.com/nt_history.html

  "To divert a legal action threatened by Digital, in 1995 Microsoft payed
   to Digital between 65 million and 100 million dollars [3]. More
   importantly, Microsoft also agreed to support Windows NT for Digital's
   Alpha chip, which as a newcomer to the chip market was in desperate
   position against Intel. This deal with the devil was just another in a
   series of mistakes made by Digital, which eventually brought the computer
   giant down to it's knees."

I like this one:

http://www.winntmag.com/Articles/Index.cfm?ArticleID=4494&Action=Comm...

   History cannot be changed. David and VMS are the origins of NT. But, who
   removed VMS's stability from NT? What about NT's equivalent of VMS's
   Mount Verification (MV)? I am a systems administrator, and we have a VAX
   VMS and five NT 4.0 servers. The VAX VMS has run without a crash or
   problem for the past 4 years. Meanwhile, the NT servers have crashed
   several times in the first few months of use. Plenty of tweaking and
   adding extra hardware have decreased the number of crashes, but NT will
   never be like VMS. Will NT make it to its 20th anniversary, as VMS did in
   October 1998?

Chris

 
 
 

This is why businesses should avoid windoze/unix/linux ...

Post by GreyClou » Mon, 10 Jun 2002 19:12:22



> After takin' a swig o' grog, Mike Byrns belched out this bit o' wisdom:

> > The evolution of VMS already runs on Intel.  It's called Windows XP.  Quit
> > whining about old OSs.  They are dead.  XP is VMS with a real GUI.  Ask the
> > maker.

> Yeah, ask him.  He's the guy grumbling in the corner about how Microsoft
> screwed up his work.  Yeah, he's reallllly happy with the stability of
> his "VMS" now.

> Yeah, Bill Gates even has this guy fooled:

> http://www.veryComputer.com/,14179,2819659,0...

>    "So, even if XP is the sole survivor of the mid 2000's OS wars,  both
>    concepts and code, not to mention the file structure of VMS will  live on
>    for the foreseeable future. And to use an operation system that  is so
>    friendly, rugged, dependable, with built-in help and an intuitive user
>    interface, well, it just makes me happy. Actually, I see VMS  having a
>    renaissance/revival that nary an operating system has ever  seen.  VMS on
>    a notebook...I'm counting the days..."

> I'm actually going to cross post this to COLA, so the VMS users can
> read this stuff.

> And Bill gates was happy to "steal" VMS concepts:

> http://www.veryComputer.com/

>   "To divert a legal action threatened by Digital, in 1995 Microsoft payed
>    to Digital between 65 million and 100 million dollars [3]. More
>    importantly, Microsoft also agreed to support Windows NT for Digital's
>    Alpha chip, which as a newcomer to the chip market was in desperate
>    position against Intel. This deal with the devil was just another in a
>    series of mistakes made by Digital, which eventually brought the computer
>    giant down to it's knees."

> I like this one:

> http://www.veryComputer.com/

>    History cannot be changed. David and VMS are the origins of NT. But, who
>    removed VMS's stability from NT? What about NT's equivalent of VMS's
>    Mount Verification (MV)? I am a systems administrator, and we have a VAX
>    VMS and five NT 4.0 servers. The VAX VMS has run without a crash or
>    problem for the past 4 years. Meanwhile, the NT servers have crashed
>    several times in the first few months of use. Plenty of tweaking and
>    adding extra hardware have decreased the number of crashes, but NT will
>    never be like VMS. Will NT make it to its 20th anniversary, as VMS did in
>    October 1998?

> Chris

Hey Chris, where'd you find this lulu???
Tell the bozo that VMS and NT have nothing in common.
Especially XPee.  It's an insult to us OpenVMS to be
compared to the*XPee. :-)

 
 
 

1. This is why businesses should avoid windoze/unix/linux ...

VMS is the only secure web alternative today ...

Study: Open-source poses security risks

By Matthew Broersma
ZDNet (UK)
May 31, 2002, 9:30 AM PT

A conservative U.S. think-tank suggests in an upcoming report that
open-source software is inherently less secure than proprietary
software, and will warn governments against relying on open-source for
national security.

The white paper, Opening the Open Source Debate, from the Alexis de
Tocqueville Institution (ADTI) will suggest that open source opens the
gates to hackers and terrorists. "Terrorists trying to hack or disrupt
U.S. computer networks might find it easier if the federal government
attempts to switch to 'open source' as some groups propose," ADTI said
in a statement released ahead of the report.

Open-source software is freely available for distribution and
modification, as long as the modified software is itself available
under open-source terms. The Linux operating system is the best-known
example of open source, having become popular in the Web server market
because of its stability and low cost.

Many researchers have also suggested that since a large community
contributes to and scrutinizes open-source code, security holes are
less likely to occur than in proprietary software, and can be caught
and fixed more quickly.

The ADTI white paper, to be released next week, will take the opposite
line, outlining "how open source might facilitate efforts to disrupt
or sabotage electronic commerce, air traffic control or even sensitive
surveillance systems," the institute said.

"Computer systems are the backbone to U.S. national security," said
ADTI chairman Gregory Fossedal. "Before the Pentagon and other federal
agencies make uninformed decisions to alter the very foundation of
computer security, they should study the potential consequences
carefully."

2. smbfs mounting of NT server.

3. Socket??

4. netstat help

5. Telnet with ZModem?

6. Why oh why does DOS/Windoze work while Linux fails?

7. Handspring sync to Linux vs CLIE to Windoze -> Linux 1 Windoze 10

8. I am nervous about switching to Linux for business.

9. Microsoft instructs Big Business on how to avoid using Free Software

10. Installing Windoze or linux first....<-reinstalling windoze