Something lost, something gained

Something lost, something gained

Post by GeneralP » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 08:08:11



My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
in the two months I've had it.

Today I checked out HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
to see what starts up when I login.

I see the Dell keyboard thingy that makes the special keyboard buttons
work starts up here.  I want to shut it off because one of the buttons
makes the computer sleep, and it never wakes up again.

So I delete the key.  I logout, and log back in, CTRL-ALT-DEL, lo-and-
behold, it's not running.

To check to see if I was successful, I hit the 'E-mail' key.

Chalk that up to two BSODs since I've owned it.  There goes my 20-day
uptime.  (Yeah, I quit shutting it off when I'm done with it for
convenience.)

I rebooted and checked the buttons.  No BSOD.  Well, won't risk that,
so I put the registry key back.

On a positive note, it took me 5 minutes to install the dhcpd RPM
from Red Hat 7.3 (and upgrade the dhcpcd to 7.3's) and configure it,
then set my XP box to get its info from DHCP.  Now I can plug boxen
into the network and not have to configure statics.  That was a breeze.
Props to the DHCP HOWTO.

Question: I mount shares in my /etc/fstab by hostname.  But I had
to remove the host entries from /etc/hosts because their IPs are
dynamic now.  I don't want to do a host { } entry in my dhcpd.conf
to explicitly assign an IP to this box, so my question is:

can dhcpd automagically update /etc/hosts (or the kernel host table)
when a lease is granted?

Thanks,
GeneralPF

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Peter K?hlman » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 08:17:17



> My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
> in the two months I've had it.

> Today I checked out HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
> to see what starts up when I login.

> I see the Dell keyboard thingy that makes the special keyboard buttons
> work starts up here.  I want to shut it off because one of the buttons
> makes the computer sleep, and it never wakes up again.

> So I delete the key.  I logout, and log back in, CTRL-ALT-DEL, lo-and-
> behold, it's not running.

> To check to see if I was successful, I hit the 'E-mail' key.

> Chalk that up to two BSODs since I've owned it.  There goes my 20-day
> uptime.  (Yeah, I quit shutting it off when I'm done with it for
> convenience.)

> I rebooted and checked the buttons.  No BSOD.  Well, won't risk that,
> so I put the registry key back.

> On a positive note, it took me 5 minutes to install the dhcpd RPM
> from Red Hat 7.3 (and upgrade the dhcpcd to 7.3's) and configure it,
> then set my XP box to get its info from DHCP.  Now I can plug boxen
> into the network and not have to configure statics.  That was a breeze.
> Props to the DHCP HOWTO.

> Question: I mount shares in my /etc/fstab by hostname.  But I had
> to remove the host entries from /etc/hosts because their IPs are
> dynamic now.  I don't want to do a host { } entry in my dhcpd.conf
> to explicitly assign an IP to this box, so my question is:

> can dhcpd automagically update /etc/hosts (or the kernel host table)
> when a lease is granted?

Don't know about the hosts file, but DHCP can update a DNS running on your
box. Install a DNS, and your set

Peter
--
Linux is like a wigwam: no windows, no gates and an apache inside!

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Simon Cook » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 08:50:28



> My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
> in the two months I've had it.

> Today I checked out HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
> to see what starts up when I login.

> I see the Dell keyboard thingy that makes the special keyboard buttons
> work starts up here.  I want to shut it off because one of the buttons
> makes the computer sleep, and it never wakes up again.

> So I delete the key.  I logout, and log back in, CTRL-ALT-DEL, lo-and-
> behold, it's not running.

> To check to see if I was successful, I hit the 'E-mail' key.

> Chalk that up to two BSODs since I've owned it.  There goes my 20-day
> uptime.  (Yeah, I quit shutting it off when I'm done with it for
> convenience.)

God I hate that crap.

If you have the option, reinstall XP *without* all the Dell 'bonus'
software, do a System Restore checkpoint, and then slowly install all of
their addon apps one by one.

I did something similar when I got my Gateway at work. I don't know what
the hell they did to XP, but they managed to break the encryption store
so none of my passwords were being stored.

I wish the OEMs wouldn't put shitty software the system. Particularly
stuff that alters the basic system and obviously hasn't been tested out.
And ESPECIALLY anything that hooks the keyboard, mouse or message
queues -- because a bug in code in there will take down the GUI.

Simon

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Paul Cook » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 10:38:00



> My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
> in the two months I've had it.

> Today I checked out HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
> to see what starts up when I login.

> I see the Dell keyboard thingy that makes the special keyboard buttons
> work starts up here.  I want to shut it off because one of the buttons
> makes the computer sleep, and it never wakes up again.

> So I delete the key.  I logout, and log back in, CTRL-ALT-DEL, lo-and-
> behold, it's not running.

> To check to see if I was successful, I hit the 'E-mail' key.

> Chalk that up to two BSODs since I've owned it.  There goes my 20-day
> uptime.  (Yeah, I quit shutting it off when I'm done with it for
> convenience.)

> I rebooted and checked the buttons.  No BSOD.  Well, won't risk that,
> so I put the registry key back.

can't you do that with msconfig or whatever the equivalent is on XP???

so much safer than messing with registry keys... and you can easily check
the little box afterwards to re-enable the loading of that service

--
Paul Cooke
  Registered Linux user 273897 Machine registration number 156819
  Linux Counter: Home Page = http://counter.li.org/

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Sinister Midge » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 07:15:09


On Sun, 14 Jul 2002 06:50:28 +0000, Simon Cooke claimed:


>> My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
>> in the two months I've had it.

>> Today I checked out HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
>> to see what starts up when I login.

>> I see the Dell keyboard thingy that makes the special keyboard buttons
>> work starts up here.  I want to shut it off because one of the buttons
>> makes the computer sleep, and it never wakes up again.

>> So I delete the key.  I logout, and log back in, CTRL-ALT-DEL, lo-and-
>> behold, it's not running.

>> To check to see if I was successful, I hit the 'E-mail' key.

>> Chalk that up to two BSODs since I've owned it.  There goes my 20-day
>> uptime.  (Yeah, I quit shutting it off when I'm done with it for
>> convenience.)

> God I hate that crap.

> If you have the option, reinstall XP *without* all the Dell 'bonus'
> software, do a System Restore checkpoint, and then slowly install all of
> their addon apps one by one.

Did somebody fart? Something smells really awful!!!

Ahhh, it's just a troll!

Maybe he doesn't want to jump through MS-Hoops 8.0. Did you read anywhere
in there that he was asking for help with WinDoze? If so, you're worse off
than I thought.

Quote:> I did something similar when I got my Gateway at work. I don't know what
> the hell they did to XP, but they managed to break the encryption store
> so none of my passwords were being stored.

How cute. Maybe eX-Pee is broke? Naah!! Nothing from Micros~1 can be
blamed, huh?

Quote:> I wish the OEMs wouldn't put shitty software the system. Particularly
> stuff that alters the basic system and obviously hasn't been tested out.
> And ESPECIALLY anything that hooks the keyboard, mouse or message queues
> -- because a bug in code in there will take down the GUI.

Naturally it can't have anything to do with Micro-Soft hiding the code and
making it impossible for people to know what the hell they're doing when
they write hooks, right? If that was the problem, there'd probably be a
lot of blue screens and/or spontaneous rebooting. We know those never
happen! And if they did you can damned sure guarantee it was the OEM's
fault!!

Quote:> Simon

--
The box said Windows XP or better. So I installed linux.
 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by mlw » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 14:57:17



> My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
> in the two months I've had it.

That must be some strange usage of the word "stable" that I wasn't previously
aware of. If it *ever* blue-screens, the system is not stable.
 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by D. C. Session » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 19:11:06



> Question: I mount shares in my /etc/fstab by hostname.  But I had
> to remove the host entries from /etc/hosts because their IPs are
> dynamic now.  I don't want to do a host { } entry in my dhcpd.conf
> to explicitly assign an IP to this box, so my question is:

You can configure dhcpd to reserve specific IPs for each MAC,
so that you have a static IP dynamically assigned.

--
|              If it were easy, it wouldn't be fun!             |

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by GeneralP » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 23:18:18


On Sun, 14 Jul 2002 10:11:06 -0700, D. C. Sessions assert()ed:

>> Question: I mount shares in my /etc/fstab by hostname.  But I had
>> to remove the host entries from /etc/hosts because their IPs are
>> dynamic now.  I don't want to do a host { } entry in my dhcpd.conf

                 ^^^^^^^^^^^^
Quote:>> to explicitly assign an IP to this box, so my question is:

      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Quote:

> You can configure dhcpd to reserve specific IPs for each MAC,
> so that you have a static IP dynamically assigned.

I don't want to sound rude, but my last sentence said I want
to avoid explicit assignment.

Oh well, back to the drawing board...

Thanks anyway,
GeneralPF

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Johan Lindquis » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 23:29:04


Sun, 14 Jul 2002 at 08:08 GMT, peering quizzically at his shoes,

Quote:> Question: I mount shares in my /etc/fstab by hostname. But I had
> to remove the host entries from /etc/hosts because their IPs are
> dynamic now. I don't want to do a host { } entry in my dhcpd.conf to
> explicitly assign an IP to this box, so my question is:

First off, it's generally a bad thing having servers that change IP.
I wouldn't recommend it. If you're mounting samba shares, you might
get some help from wins, but I don't know if it updates itself quickly
enough for this scheme to work.

Quote:> can dhcpd automagically update /etc/hosts (or the kernel host table)
> when a lease is granted?

If you combine dhcp with dynamic dns (google for this, I neither
have the specifics nor personal experience), you can make the dhcp
server automagically update your dns when a dhcp client requests (and
receives) an IP.

hth.

--
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.      Perth ---> *
 11:25pm  up 14 days,  8:14,  1 user,  load average: 1.39, 1.59, 1.61
$ cat /dev/bollocks                      Registered Linux user #261729
disintermediate collaborative ROI

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Kenneth Down » Mon, 15 Jul 2002 16:46:10




>> My XP Home box has always been stable -- it's only blue-screened once
>> in the two months I've had it.

>> Today I checked out HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
>> to see what starts up when I login.

>> I see the Dell keyboard thingy that makes the special keyboard buttons
>> work starts up here.  I want to shut it off because one of the buttons
>> makes the computer sleep, and it never wakes up again.

>> So I delete the key.  I logout, and log back in, CTRL-ALT-DEL, lo-and-
>> behold, it's not running.

>> To check to see if I was successful, I hit the 'E-mail' key.

>> Chalk that up to two BSODs since I've owned it.  There goes my 20-day
>> uptime.  (Yeah, I quit shutting it off when I'm done with it for
>> convenience.)

> God I hate that crap.

> If you have the option, reinstall XP *without* all the Dell 'bonus'

                          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Quote:> software, do a System Restore checkpoint, and then slowly install all of

                                                     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Quote:> their addon apps one by one.

        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Your Attention Please.  The Windows Reinstall Advisory Notification System
has detected a  WRANS EVENT!  This is not a drill!  A Windows user has
recommended that somebody reinstall Windows in order to solve a problem.

On the WRANS ridicule scale of 1 to 4, this is a LEVEL 3 WRANS EVENT:

  Level 1:  Extreme virus/trojan/worm damage, generic malicious code
  Level 2:  Box just "doesn't seem to work right" anymore
  Level 3:  Single Setting Change or other small change caused BSOD
  Level 4:  Microsoft-provided Service Pack busted the box

Please form an ORDERLY LINE to ridicule and abuse this hopelessly clueless
troll.  WRANS sincerely hopes there will be no pushing or shoving.

Should you have medical training, please be advised that you may be called
upon to help Linux users who suffer harm as a result of reading the post by
the Windows users.  Broken bones may result from falling off chairs.  Burns
from spilled coffee may result.  In extreme cases, major surgery may be
required from split guts due to uncontrollable laughing.

If you are a member of the WRANS RHARP (Rapid HArdware Replacement
Program), please activate your RHARP hotline, as Level 3 WRANS Events are
known to cause a high demand for new keyboards and monitors due to hardware
damage caused by coffee and other liquids being sprayed or spilled all over
them when the Linux user reads the post from the Windows user.

As usual, WRANS will be accepting donations for our VOW program (Victims of
Windows), who, through no fault of their own, may rely on this person's
judgement and skill for their computing needs.

This ends this WRANS notification.

Quote:

> I did something similar when I got my Gateway at work. I don't know what
> the hell they did to XP, but they managed to break the encryption store
> so none of my passwords were being stored.

> I wish the OEMs wouldn't put shitty software the system. Particularly
> stuff that alters the basic system and obviously hasn't been tested out.
> And ESPECIALLY anything that hooks the keyboard, mouse or message
> queues -- because a bug in code in there will take down the GUI.

> Simon

--
Ken
Linux, the more you learn, the more you love
 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Simon Cook » Tue, 16 Jul 2002 02:04:06




>> If you have the option, reinstall XP *without* all the Dell 'bonus'
>> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

>> software, do a System Restore checkpoint, and then slowly install
>> all of
>> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ their addon apps one by one.
>         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

> Your Attention Please.  The Windows Reinstall Advisory Notification
> System has detected a  WRANS EVENT!  This is not a drill!  A Windows
> user has recommended that somebody reinstall Windows in order to
> solve a problem.

[snip crap]

Kenneth;

The reason I suggest this is because OEMs seem to have an ugly tendency
of installing apps which overwrite system files and generally * up
the system.

Given that uninstalling such apps (which are badly written pieces of
crap) can be difficult -- if not impossible -- because typically their
installers are complete and utter shit, reinstalling the OS is pretty
much the only way to fix the problem unless you want to manually go
through all of the files on the Restore CD, ripping open the CABs, and
restoring them that way.

After which you'd have to go through and edit the entire configuration
of the system.

It's like looking for a needle in a haystack.

Let me ask you this:

I give you a Linux system with 20,000 library and application files in
it. 40 of those files are 'bad', and are breaking KDE in spurious ways.
There are (say) 300 configuration files which might have been modified
from good data, to bad settings.

You have two choices:
1. Reinstall Linux from a known-good distro, where you know you won't
have any of those problems.
2. Go through each of the files, trying to find the ones which are of
different versions, and trying to find which configuration settings have
been changed. You estimate that this task will take you 3 days, and you
still won't know at the end if you got everything without going through
EVERY SINGLE FILE with a fine-toothed comb.

Which would you pick?

If you pick the 3 days option, unless you've got a really good reason to
do so, or you're unemployed, you're lying.

Simon

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Roy Cull » Tue, 16 Jul 2002 03:07:09





>> God I hate that crap.

>> If you have the option, reinstall XP *without* all the Dell 'bonus'
>                           ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

>> software, do a System Restore checkpoint, and then slowly install all of
>                                                      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>> their addon apps one by one.
>         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

> Your Attention Please.  The Windows Reinstall Advisory Notification
> System has detected a WRANS EVENT!  This is not a drill!  A Windows
> user has recommended that somebody reinstall Windows in order to
> solve a problem.

> On the WRANS ridicule scale of 1 to 4, this is a LEVEL 3 WRANS EVENT:

>   Level 1:  Extreme virus/trojan/worm damage, generic malicious code
>   Level 2:  Box just "doesn't seem to work right" anymore
>   Level 3:  Single Setting Change or other small change caused BSOD
>   Level 4:  Microsoft-provided Service Pack busted the box

> Please form an ORDERLY LINE to ridicule and abuse this hopelessly
> clueless troll.  WRANS sincerely hopes there will be no pushing or
> shoving.

> Should you have medical training, please be advised that you may be
> called upon to help Linux users who suffer harm as a result of
> reading the post by the Windows users.  Broken bones may result from
> falling off chairs.  Burns from spilled coffee may result.  In
> extreme cases, major surgery may be required from split guts due to
> uncontrollable laughing.

> If you are a member of the WRANS RHARP (Rapid HArdware Replacement
> Program), please activate your RHARP hotline, as Level 3 WRANS
> Events are known to cause a high demand for new keyboards and
> monitors due to hardware damage caused by coffee and other liquids
> being sprayed or spilled all over them when the Linux user reads the
> post from the Windows user.

> As usual, WRANS will be accepting donations for our VOW program
> (Victims of Windows), who, through no fault of their own, may rely
> on this person's judgement and skill for their computing needs.

> This ends this WRANS notification.

Lets not forget RAIS (Random Application Installation Sequence).
Before starting to reinstall apps MS recommend that you list all
the apps on a sheet of paper. Then write every unique permutation
possible for installing these apps on the sheet of paper. Then
proceed as follows:

    while (more app install sequences) {
        Reinstall OS
        foreach app in current sequence {
            Install app (reboot as required by app)
            reboot
            next app if system stable
        }
        reboot
        last install sequence if system stable
    }
    reboot
    if (system stable) {
        record app install sequence (it may work next time)
        exit
    }
    else {
        purchase latest OS and apps and repeat
    }

This reinstall procedure is provided by MS at no extra cost. Extensive
analysis has shown that for N apps most users (over 50%) achieve a
successful reinstall in less than N-1 iterations of the loop. Of the
remaining < 50%, purchasing a new system with the apps preinstalled has
been known to be successful.

MS want you to get the maximum possible from your system. Should all
of the above fail please call us. Upon verification of your credit
card details we will devote as much time as your credit limit allows
in solving our^H^H^Hyour problem.

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by Jimb » Tue, 16 Jul 2002 03:36:06




Quote:> Your Attention Please.  The Windows Reinstall Advisory Notification
> System has detected a  WRANS EVENT!  This is not a drill!  A Windows
> user has recommended that somebody reinstall Windows in order to solve
> a problem.

> On the WRANS ridicule scale of 1 to 4, this is a LEVEL 3 WRANS EVENT:

>   Level 1:  Extreme virus/trojan/worm damage, generic malicious code
>   Level 2:  Box just "doesn't seem to work right" anymore
>   Level 3:  Single Setting Change or other small change caused BSOD
>   Level 4:  Microsoft-provided Service Pack busted the box

> Please form an ORDERLY LINE to ridicule and abuse this hopelessly
> clueless troll.  WRANS sincerely hopes there will be no pushing or
> shoving.

> Should you have medical training, please be advised that you may be
> called upon to help Linux users who suffer harm as a result of reading
> the post by the Windows users.  Broken bones may result from falling
> off chairs.  Burns from spilled coffee may result.  In extreme cases,
> major surgery may be required from split guts due to uncontrollable
> laughing.

> If you are a member of the WRANS RHARP (Rapid HArdware Replacement
> Program), please activate your RHARP hotline, as Level 3 WRANS Events
> are known to cause a high demand for new keyboards and monitors due to
> hardware damage caused by coffee and other liquids being sprayed or
> spilled all over them when the Linux user reads the post from the
> Windows user.

> As usual, WRANS will be accepting donations for our VOW program
> (Victims of Windows), who, through no fault of their own, may rely on
> this person's judgement and skill for their computing needs.

> This ends this WRANS notification.

Kenneth,

When can I expect my replacement Logitech Wireless Freedom Pro Optical?
Coca-Cola doesn't mix too well with electronics ;)(it's not fun fizzin' in
the sinuses either)

 
 
 

Something lost, something gained

Post by D. C. Session » Tue, 16 Jul 2002 03:10:08



> I give you a Linux system with 20,000 library and application files in
> it. 40 of those files are 'bad', and are breaking KDE in spurious ways.
> There are (say) 300 configuration files which might have been modified
> from good data, to bad settings.

> You have two choices:
> 1. Reinstall Linux from a known-good distro, where you know you won't
> have any of those problems.
> 2. Go through each of the files, trying to find the ones which are of
> different versions, and trying to find which configuration settings have
> been changed. You estimate that this task will take you 3 days, and you
> still won't know at the end if you got everything without going through
> EVERY SINGLE FILE with a fine-toothed comb.

> Which would you pick?

I'll take Door #3, Alex.

I'd work with other victims of this misconfiguring POS/OEM
to find out what files they'd mutilated from the original
status and come up with a "put it back" script.  Even with
MicroSnot you can generally score updated, fixed, etc.
files since the OEM is contractually bound to ship an
unmodified set of CABs and only do its dastardlies *after*
the base system is installed.

So, assuming I were ever so stupid as to let a vendor do
something like that to me, I'd get a global fix worked out.
With thousands of victims worldwide, it wouldn't take all
that long and then we'd *all* have an alternative to the
false dilemma you describe.

See .signature

--
|      An engineer is someone who will spend three hours        |
|      figuring out how to do a two-hour job in one hour.       |

 
 
 

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