Developing and Testing a Complete "Hello World" J2EE Application with IBM's WSAD for Linux

Developing and Testing a Complete "Hello World" J2EE Application with IBM's WSAD for Linux

Post by Fran » Thu, 22 Aug 2002 02:42:59



IBM just launched a two part tutorial series on IBM WebSphere Studio
Application Developer for Linux Version 4.0.3 (WSAD) covering how to
develop, test, run, and debug a complete J2EE application. The
application includes entity and session EJBs, a servlet, a JSP page,
and an HTML home page, and the tutorial focuses extensively on EJB
development. First, you'll have to register once(a quick 30 seconds
max) for it all. Part 1 shows you how to use WSAD to develop the J2EE
application, while Part 2 shows you how to deploy and test the
application on WSAD for Linux. You'll need the WSAD download as well.

Quote:> Tutorial and Download Registration <

http://www7b.software.ibm.com/reg/wsdd/wsdd-i?S_TACT=102B7W67&S_CMP=G...

Quote:> WSAD download <

http://www7b.boulder.ibm.com/dl/swws/swwsgddb-i?S_TACT=102B7W67&S_CMP...

Quote:> Tutorial - Part 1 <

http://www7b.software.ibm.com/wsdd/registered/tutorials/0206_wosnick/...

Quote:> Tutorial - Part 2 <

http://www7b.software.ibm.com/wsdd/registered/tutorials/0208_wosnick/...
 
 
 

Developing and Testing a Complete "Hello World" J2EE Application with IBM's WSAD for Linux

Post by Arnt Karlse » Thu, 22 Aug 2002 05:59:34




Quote:> IBM just launched a two part tutorial series on IBM WebSphere Studio
> Application Developer for Linux Version 4.0.3 (WSAD) covering how to
> develop, test, run, and debug a complete J2EE application. The
> application includes entity and session EJBs, a servlet, a JSP page,
> and an HTML home page, and the tutorial focuses extensively on EJB
> development. First, you'll have to register once(a quick 30 seconds
> max) for it all. Part 1 shows you how to use WSAD to develop the J2EE
> application, while Part 2 shows you how to deploy and test the
> application on WSAD for Linux. You'll need the WSAD download as well.

>> Tutorial and Download Registration <
> http://www7b.software.ibm.com/reg/wsdd/wsdd-i?S_TACT=102B7W67&S_CMP=G...

>> WSAD download <
> http://www7b.boulder.ibm.com/dl/swws/swwsgddb-i?S_TACT=102B7W67&S_CMP...

>> Tutorial - Part 1 <
> http://www7b.software.ibm.com/wsdd/registered/tutorials/0206_wosnick/...

>> Tutorial - Part 2 <
> http://www7b.software.ibm.com/wsdd/registered/tutorials/0208_wosnick/...

..excellent.  Post it in col.announce, where it belongs, too. ;-)

--
..med vennlig hilsen = with Kind Regards from Arnt... ;-)
...with a number of polar bear hunters in his ancestry...
  Scenarios always come in sets of three:
  best case, worst case, and just in case.

 
 
 

1. erroneous "hello" from forked "hello world" process!


fork() and wait() are not part of the C language, so this belongs in
comp.unix.programmer.  I have redirected followups.  (Old-timers may
note that I try to be impartial about all misdirected stuff, not just
MS-DOS stuff).

His TA expects

to produce

but instead it produces one of `Hello\nHello\nWorld' or `Hello\nWorld\nHello'.

Your TA should; he or she should certainly know about the boundaries
between `things in the operating system' and `things not in the
operating system' in order to work with an OS class in the first place.
printf() is part of the C runtime system, *not* the Unix OS; fork()
and wait() are part of the Unix OS, not the C runtime system.  Thus
there is no guarantee about the way the two interact.

In particular, when printing to a `buffered' file the runtime system
buffers (hence the name) the text until it has a `suitable amount' to
write at once.  It then sends it all out with one or more write() system
calls.  Since fork() simply duplicates all the data in the program, it
duplicates any buffered text.  Thus the program above becomes one
process with `Hello\n' buffered, and one with `Hello\nWorld\n' buffered.

The real oddity is not that the word `Hello' is ever duplicated, but
rather that it is sometimes *not* duplicated.  This happens whenever
the string `Hello\n' is written out before the program forks, which
includes whenever the standard output is line buffered or unbuffered.
--
In-Real-Life: Chris Torek, Univ of MD Comp Sci Dept (+1 301 405 2750)

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