inexpensive networking solutions(long)

inexpensive networking solutions(long)

Post by Chuck Bermingha » Wed, 12 Mar 1997 04:00:00





Quote:> I've been trying to locate any efforts-to-date
> regarding the application of Linux-oriented
> solutions to underfunded institutions for the
> purpose of rolling out inexpensive Local Area
> Networks.

...

I am interested in the subject also, as I have recently been involved in
what I view to be a terribly over-priced NT installation (IMHO.)

To begin with, though, I would like to know if there are any hardware
retailers/resellers who can meet the following criteria:

- low-cost hardware
- knowledge of Linux requirements
- willing to help select hardware compatable with Linux

Anybody have suggestions?

 
 
 

inexpensive networking solutions(long)

Post by John Steve » Thu, 13 Mar 1997 04:00:00




>I am interested in the subject also, as I have recently been involved in
>what I view to be a terribly over-priced NT installation (IMHO.)

>To begin with, though, I would like to know if there are any hardware
>retailers/resellers who can meet the following criteria:

>- low-cost hardware
>- knowledge of Linux requirements
>- willing to help select hardware compatable with Linux

That's me.

I've installed a number of 'cheap' Linux servers and small LAN's.

One example:

1) 100 MHz 486 motherboard, 16 MBytes of memory, case, power supply,
   3.5" floppy disk drive, 1 GByte HDD and keyboard for ~$500 new.

   The client had a used 14.4Kbps modem, which was also dropped in.

2) Installed Linux, NE2000 clone network card and coax style network
   cable for another $70.

3) The box currently supports a POS system, small business support
   software support system, email and internet access through the
   modem, file and print server for a Windows 95 box (there had to
   be another box, or why bother with the network right ;->) and
   the basic toys and games.

Total cost for system: $570.

Quote:>Anybody have suggestions?

How much did you spend on your NT installation, what does it do, and
what do you need it to do?  Note that 10BaseT type networking costs
more than 10Base2, as you are required to have a hub, and those cost
around $100 minimum.

Note that Linux cannot work for you if you require the server to be
an MS compute server, as obviously the Linux server won't run MS
software.

John S.

 
 
 

inexpensive networking solutions(long)

Post by Cary B. O'Bri » Sat, 15 Mar 1997 04:00:00






>>I am interested in the subject also, as I have recently been involved in
>>what I view to be a terribly over-priced NT installation (IMHO.)

>>To begin with, though, I would like to know if there are any hardware
>>retailers/resellers who can meet the following criteria:

>>- low-cost hardware
>>- knowledge of Linux requirements
>>- willing to help select hardware compatable with Linux

>That's me.

[good examples of inexpensive linux systems]

Quote:

>How much did you spend on your NT installation, what does it do, and
>what do you need it to do?  Note that 10BaseT type networking costs
>more than 10Base2, as you are required to have a hub, and those cost
>around $100 minimum.

I feel obligated to disagree slightly about 10Base2vsT.  It is
true that 10BaseT needs a hub, but they can be had for less than
$70 US if you look hard (At least here in the DC area).  

This minor cost is worth it in comparison to the countless hours
I have wasted fighting with bad terminations and coax crimps, or
trying to deduce twisted network topologies.  And you are
now more likely to be able to find a 10baseT cable at off
hours (as opposed to the correct kind of coax cable, some BNC's,
and a crimp tool).

Buy the hub.  Go with 10baseT.  What is 2 hours of your time
worth.

Quote:>Note that Linux cannot work for you if you require the server to be
>an MS compute server, as obviously the Linux server won't run MS
>software.

I'm not sure what applications require an NT compute server.  If you
need a backend database accessable through ODBC, linux works fine.
Just wondering.

Other than that John is 100% correct.

-- cary

 
 
 

inexpensive networking solutions(long)

Post by John Steve » Sat, 15 Mar 1997 04:00:00






>>That's me.
>[good examples of inexpensive linux systems]

>>How much did you spend on your NT installation, what does it do, and
>>what do you need it to do?  Note that 10BaseT type networking costs
>>more than 10Base2, as you are required to have a hub, and those cost
>>around $100 minimum.

>I feel obligated to disagree slightly about 10Base2vsT.  It is
>true that 10BaseT needs a hub, but they can be had for less than
>$70 US if you look hard (At least here in the DC area).  

Err, yeah, but that is still $70 more than not buying it, isn't it?

Note that I agree that 10BaseT is nicer, but for a small network,
10Base2 is probably good enough.

Quote:>This minor cost is worth it in comparison to the countless hours
>I have wasted fighting with bad terminations and coax crimps, or
>trying to deduce twisted network topologies.  And you are
>now more likely to be able to find a 10baseT cable at off
>hours (as opposed to the correct kind of coax cable, some BNC's,
>and a crimp tool).

Hmm.  I've never had much problems with bad terminations, or problems
in the cable run, but then again, I try to use 10Base2 only in small
lans, on reasonably short segements (I usually figure that above 10
to 12, you might as well go 10BaseT, because in that price range, a
hub isn't as big a percentage of total cost).

Quote:>Buy the hub.  Go with 10baseT.  What is 2 hours of your time
>worth.

Yah.  Arguments can be made either way.  Personally, I draw the line
between the two and use both for different enviroments.  Others go all
one way.

Just to be on the flexible side, for some installs  I specify cards
that will handle both 10Base2 and 10BaseT.  They cost a little bit
more (about 4 to 6$ per card), but that flexibility is really nice
to have in some cases.

Quote:>I'm not sure what applications require an NT compute server.  If you
>need a backend database accessable through ODBC, linux works fine.
>Just wondering.

Err, not me. ;->  The other guy might need an MS compatible computer
server.

Quote:>Other than that John is 100% correct.

I just discovered last night that the motherboards I used to buy for
small servers are no longer available, and I would have to kick in
another 40 to 60 bucks to get the lowest end (Pentium) motherboard now.

Time to find another MB manafacturer, I guess.

Note that a server doesn't really need a video sub-system.  Ideally,
a workstation needs to have a video sub-system that is aprox. half
the total value of the entire system (ie, buy a $2000 dollar box,
buy a $2000 dollar video system to go into it), but a server often
times is simply a box stuck in a closet.

For Linux enthusiasts, you can easily buy a cheap, used serial terminal
(I got one for $10) that you can use as a console.

John S.

 
 
 

inexpensive networking solutions(long)

Post by Keith E. Moo » Sun, 16 Mar 1997 04:00:00





>> I've been trying to locate any efforts-to-date
>> regarding the application of Linux-oriented
>> solutions to underfunded institutions for the
>> purpose of rolling out inexpensive Local Area
>> Networks.
>...

>I am interested in the subject also, as I have recently been involved in
>what I view to be a terribly over-priced NT installation (IMHO.)

>To begin with, though, I would like to know if there are any hardware
>retailers/resellers who can meet the following criteria:

>- low-cost hardware
>- knowledge of Linux requirements
>- willing to help select hardware compatable with Linux

>Anybody have suggestions?

Depends on what you want.  If you want to setup servers which look
like NT boxes, you can get RedHat 4.1 (or others) which comes with
Samba already running, and go from there (/usr/doc/samba*).

If you don't want to do any work, talk to WGS, which uses RedHat as
it's base, but focuses on Work Group Solutions (go figure).

http://www.redhat.com
http://www.wgs.com

--
-- Keith Moore
   President
   KMA Computer Solutions, Inc.

--
/*----C/C++--Java--VB--Pro*C--SQL--OCI--Java--Delphi--ODBC--COBOL-----*
 *        When the project must be saved at all costs:                *
 * KMA Computer Solutions, Inc.   Project Troubleshooting/Recovery    *
 *---------Linux---AIX---HPUX---SYSV---Novell---NT---OS/2---'95-------*/

 
 
 

1. *grin* Windows 2000 & HPC: Scalable, Inexpensive Supercomputing Solutions

How this for a laugh:

http://www.microsoft.com/WINDOWS2000/hpc/indstand.asp

David
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