Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by BORG » Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:00:00



Find out why exactly Caldera is suing Microsoft.
Check out:

http://www.caldera.com/news/qa.html

Caldera will soon release DOS source code. For details
check out:

http://www.caldera.com/news/opendos.html

For more information about infair market policies
by Microsoft and how Micro$oft is cheating their own
customers, check:

http://software.ora.com/news/ms_internet_frame.html

 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Rajat Dat » Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:00:00



>Caldera will soon release DOS source code. For details
>check out:

>http://www.caldera.com/news/opendos.html

Some friends and I were discussing this just a short time ago with
respect to OS/2.  With mainframe operating systems, IBM would release
the source code when you bought a license.  VM, in particular,
benefitted tremendously from this, not only with code fixes that came
in from the customers, but also implementations of real features and
ideas for new features.  Customers developed tremendous expertise,
rivalling IBM'ss development labs, about the care and feeding of VM,
and they were fanatically loyal to the system.

What IBM should do is make the OS/2 source code available, either to
buyers of an OS/2 Special Edition, or to subscribers of their
development program (I forget the name).  There will have to be appropriate
safeguards, of course, but that is legally do-able.  There are also parts
of the system that cannot be released, either because it's competitively
important to IBM or because of cross-ownership.  But there surely isn't
such problems with device-drivers, schedulers, PM, etc.etc.

rajat

 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Loren Petri » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00





>>Caldera will soon release DOS source code. For details
>>check out:
>>http://www.caldera.com/news/opendos.html
>Some friends and I were discussing this just a short time ago with
>respect to OS/2.  With mainframe operating systems, IBM would release
>the source code when you bought a license.  VM, in particular,
>benefitted tremendously from this, not only with code fixes that came
>in from the customers, but also implementations of real features and
>ideas for new features.  Customers developed tremendous expertise,
>rivalling IBM'ss development labs, about the care and feeding of VM,
>and they were fanatically loyal to the system. ...

        Seems like the story of Unix, and especially that of Linux.
--
Loren Petrich                           Happiness is a fast Macintosh

My home page: http://www.webcom.com/petrich/home.html
Mirrored at: ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/pe/petrich/home.html
 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Jason Stok » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00



> Some friends and I were discussing this just a short time ago with
> respect to OS/2.  With mainframe operating systems, IBM would release
> the source code when you bought a license.  VM, in particular,
> benefitted tremendously from this, not only with code fixes that came
> in from the customers, but also implementations of real features and
> ideas for new features.  Customers developed tremendous expertise,
> rivalling IBM'ss development labs, about the care and feeding of VM,
> and they were fanatically loyal to the system.

Ahh... those were the days.  I don't remember them of course, but those
were the days.

Quote:> What IBM should do is make the OS/2 source code available, either to
> buyers of an OS/2 Special Edition, or to subscribers of their
> development program (I forget the name).  There will have to be appropriate
> safeguards, of course, but that is legally do-able.  There are also parts
> of the system that cannot be released, either because it's competitively
> important to IBM or because of cross-ownership.  But there surely isn't
> such problems with device-drivers, schedulers, PM, etc.etc.

As Richard Stahlman has pointed out, one of the great tradgedies of the
computer industry is that young programmers don't get to see and modify a
lot of good, powerful source code.  Excepting Linux, of course.

Just as an aside, the computer industry seems to have really forgotten the
home user and computer hobbyist.  People who run their systems on the
smell of an oily rag.  I guess there's simply no money in targetting those
people.  But those people could really contribute to the industry in the
way of enhancing existing software, if they were allowed to.

Of course, IBM just wants to make a profit and it's unlikely to release
source code that makes it trivial for rival companies to reverse engineer
their code (let alone opening their code to public scrutiny - might be
quite embarrassing in some circumstances) and IBM has a similar history to
Microsoft in exploiting unfair software patents.  So I think this is
unlikely.

I wonder what DOS source code looks like?  Anyone want to plug for

#ifdef BUGS...

--
Cheers,


 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Rajat Dat » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00






>>>Caldera will soon release DOS source code. For details
>>>check out:
>>>http://www.caldera.com/news/opendos.html

>>Some friends and I were discussing this just a short time ago with
>>respect to OS/2.  With mainframe operating systems, IBM would release
>>the source code when you bought a license.  VM, in particular,
>>benefitted tremendously from this, not only with code fixes that came
>>in from the customers, but also implementations of real features and
>>ideas for new features.  Customers developed tremendous expertise,
>>rivalling IBM'ss development labs, about the care and feeding of VM,
>>and they were fanatically loyal to the system. ...

>    Seems like the story of Unix, and especially that of Linux.
>--

Yes.

Now, in the days of downsizing, it seems an obvious strategy to me to
harness the efforts of customers to improve your products.  Appropriate
legalese can be written to protect your code, and anyway, the stuff that
is really critical doesn't have to be released.

Since IBM is cutting down the number of OS/2 developers, this would be a
way to augment their resources.

rajat

 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Richard L Hartm » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Quote:>Some friends and I were discussing this just a short time ago with
>respect to OS/2.  With mainframe operating systems, IBM would release
>the source code when you bought a license.  VM, in particular,
>benefitted tremendously from this, not only with code fixes that came
>in from the customers, but also implementations of real features and
>ideas for new features.  Customers developed tremendous expertise,
>rivalling IBM'ss development labs, about the care and feeding of VM,
>and they were fanatically loyal to the system.

That's happening again in the Linux community, right now.
 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Ian S. Nels » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00



>Now, in the days of downsizing, it seems an obvious strategy to me to
>harness the efforts of customers to improve your products.  Appropriate
>legalese can be written to protect your code, and anyway, the stuff that
>is really critical doesn't have to be released.
>Since IBM is cutting down the number of OS/2 developers, this would be a
>way to augment their resources.

The problem is that modern commercial OSes (even UNIX) have a lot of code
that the OS vendor didn't write.  OS/2 has some MS code, ATM, and
probably some other code. You can't exactly just give that away most
of the time.
 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Jonathan W. Hendr » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00


Does anyone happen to know if OpenDos could be integrated with
Win95?

It would be great if OpenDos could be modified to be more
Unix-like, so that bringing up a shell on Win95 would be
more like bringing up a shell on NeXTSTEP. Granted, it
couldn't be exactly the same, but anything would be better.

Seems like the sort of folks who work on linux could do
more for DOS than Bill Gates ever did.

Of course, Microsoft would probably modify their license
to prevent this. ;)

 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Earl H. Kinmon » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00



: Does anyone happen to know if OpenDos could be integrated with
: Win95?

: It would be great if OpenDos could be modified to be more
: Unix-like, so that bringing up a shell on Win95 would be
: more like bringing up a shell on NeXTSTEP. Granted, it
: couldn't be exactly the same, but anything would be better.

If you want DOS to look like UNIX, get the MKS Toolkit from Mortice Kern
Systems, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.  I won't touch DOS (or OS/2) without
it.

-- Earl H. Kinmonth, Kanji Users Service Operation (KUSO!), University
of Sheffield, Sheffield, England S10 2UJ

 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by Daniel l Aldh » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00



: The problem is that modern commercial OSes (even UNIX) have a lot of code
: that the OS vendor didn't write.  OS/2 has some MS code, ATM, and
: probably some other code. You can't exactly just give that away most
: of the time.

I wonder how SCO was able to start giving away free OpenServer & Unixware?

Danny

 
 
 

Caldera releases DOS source code and sues Micro$oft.

Post by drsor » Fri, 13 Sep 1996 04:00:00


: I wonder what DOS source code looks like?  Anyone want to plug for

: #ifdef BUGS...

        I wonder if Caldera is taking the time between now and 1st
Quarter '97 to rewrite the code so it doesn't look like this:

#include <stbugs.h>
#include <winblows.h>
#include <crash.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
int y;
char mssucks[255];

  printf("Novell DOS 7.0, Copyright (c) 1994 Novell, Inc.\n");
  y=random(5);
    if (y < 4) {
      crash_system("Detected Windows 3.1 on hard drive, seek error.\n");
    }
    else printf("C:\ ");

    gets(mssucks);
    y=random(5);
      if (y < 8) printf("bad command or filename");
      crash_system("Segmentati... err.. Cannot find command.com, system
halted.");

return(99);

Quote:}

        I bet they're over at Caldera now saying "Heeeey.. those wise
guys at Novell screwed us over!  This isn't DR-DOS!!   I should have
known the full source code was more than 3k before I wrote that check!"

--
------------------------------------------------------------------

"Blinky lights are the essence of modern technology."

 
 
 

1. Micro$oft: Something needs to be done!

In comp.windows.x.apps, Thomas Griffing writes:

Well... that is a leap; there are other thin-client technologies.

Microsoft making a Windows only solution... no way!  ;-)

When you think about what is involved in making distributed object
programming cross platform and language independent, you can see how a
homogeneous environment could vastly improve performance.  Not as
useful... but faster.

I donno.  I don't see why Microsoft can't bundle a Windows only N-tier
solution in with their OS.  It would be of no use to anyone who
wants/needs cross platform use.  Just as long as they don't do anything
to prohibit others from creating and using an other solutions (or stop
resellers from selling competing products).

BTW, is this that Microsoft is doing with Hydra that far off from
JavaSoft is doing with RMI?  Just a thought.

                                        - Mark
_____________________________________________________________________
Mark A. Delaney         PHONE: (650) 926-6784
Informix Software, 4100 Bohannon Drive, Menlo Park, CA 94025

NOTE: Remove the "ANTI-SPAM" from the reply address.

2. Troubles with startup

3. micro$oft vs. open source

4. SS5 parallel interface

5. Caldera to distribute source code for DOS on the Net

6. Re. Anonymous ftp account - how to set up

7. CALDERA BUYS DR. DOS, SUES MICROSOFT

8. cannot untar

9. Caldera Acquires DR DOS - Sues Microsoft for Antitrust Practices

10. CALDERA BUYS DR. DOS, SUES MICROSOFT

11. m$ "lost" the source code for W95, DOS, Q-DOS ?

12. Micro$oft sound card problems.

13. Boycott Micro$oft pages