101 Reasons

101 Reasons

Post by Ware » Thu, 07 Nov 2002 22:34:33



http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html
 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Ryan Mallo » Fri, 08 Nov 2002 02:31:02


All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle of the road, and he
said:

Quote:> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

Not to defend IE or anything, but it does actually do a number of those things
without having to fiddle with registry settings.

For example:
Syntax coloured page source: IE can specify what editor to use for viewing page
source, a friend using XP had an editor with coloured HTML editing.

IE displays the content of a link tag at the bottom of the screen, (I think
number 4 is arguing that it doesnt).

IE has a bug report page, help->feedback, allows a user to report bugs (both
website and product bugs), make suggestions or get tecnical support.

You can search bookmarks, goto favorites, right-click and select search.

Caret browsing can be achieved by using the keyboard cursor accesibilty option,
not quite the same, but it still works.

IE is semi cross platform, versions of it run on Windows, Mac and Solaris,
granted Mozilla runs on a *lot* more though.

Im sure a few others in there can be done, in some way or another with IE, and
I am also sure that one of the resident Windows experts will be along soon to
point out the ones I have missed.

I am not an advocate of Windows, I use both Windows and Linux and prefer Linux,
but I do not believe that generating false claims about open source/Linux is in
any way beneficial to the community or promoting its cause.

Cheers
Ryan

--
Linux: Because a PC is a terrible thing to waste.

Ryan Mallon: Registered Linux user #282325

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Jeff » Fri, 08 Nov 2002 04:40:25



> http://www.veryComputer.com/

I am starting to really like Mozilla and Netscape 7.x much more than IE. I
have some really bad feeling towards IE after spending many wasted hours
trying to fix this peice of *browser.
 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Matt » Fri, 08 Nov 2002 05:27:11


On Thu, 07 Nov 2002 at 00:31 GMT, Ryan Mallon
spilled his alphabet soup on the floor, and the letters spelled:

Quote:> All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle of the road, and he
> said:
>> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

<snip>

Quote:> IE is semi cross platform, versions of it run on Windows, Mac and Solaris,

Not anymore Ryan.

http://www.microsoft.com/unix/ie/default.asp

<snip>

Quote:> Cheers
> Ryan

Matt

--
Matt
 22:30:00  up 12 days, 23:51,  5 users,  load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by alt » Fri, 08 Nov 2002 05:41:04



> On Thu, 07 Nov 2002 at 00:31 GMT, Ryan Mallon
> spilled his alphabet soup on the floor, and the letters spelled:
>> All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle of the
>> road, and he said:
>>> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

> <snip>

>> IE is semi cross platform, versions of it run on Windows, Mac and
>> Solaris,

> Not anymore Ryan.

> http://www.microsoft.com/unix/ie/default.asp

> <snip>

>> Cheers
>> Ryan

> Matt

there's a loss

--
Donovan Hill
Linux: Because you can!
All rise for the Microsoft Anthem: "BAAAA!"
"Micheal, I did nothing. I did absolutely nothing and it was
everything that I thought it could be." - Peter, Office Space

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by David Dorwar » Fri, 08 Nov 2002 09:43:39



> All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle of the road, and
> he said:
>> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

> Not to defend IE or anything, but it does actually do a number of those
> things without having to fiddle with registry settings.

> For example:
> Syntax coloured page source: IE can specify what editor to use for viewing
> page source, a friend using XP had an editor with coloured HTML editing.

Isn't the list of possible editors in the registry? So you have to edit the
registry (or have an editor that does it for you) before you can pick it?

Quote:> IE displays the content of a link tag at the bottom of the screen, (I
> think number 4 is arguing that it doesnt).

No it doesn't. It will display the URL of an anchor tag when you hover over
it. A <link> tag is somewhat different. Take alook at the source of
http://greytower.net/, you will see a number of tags like this:

  <link rel="help"
         title="Here you'll find more help and information"
          href="/en/help/" />

Mozilla will (if you pick the option in the menu) display these links in a
toolbar.

Quote:> IE has a bug report page, help->feedback, allows a user to report bugs
> (both website and product bugs), make suggestions or get tecnical support.

--
David Dorward                                   http://david.us-lot.org/
"You cannot rewrite history, not one line."
                                      - The Doctor (Dr. Who: The Aztecs)
 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by The Ghost In The Machin » Fri, 08 Nov 2002 23:10:47




 wrote
on 7 Nov 2002 06:54:56 GMT


>> On Thu, 07 Nov 2002 at 00:31 GMT, Ryan Mallon
>> spilled his alphabet soup on the floor, and the letters spelled:
>>> All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle
>>> of the road, and he said:
>>>> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

>><snip>

>>> IE is semi cross platform, versions of it run on Windows,
>>> Mac and Solaris,

>> Not anymore Ryan.

>> http://www.microsoft.com/unix/ie/default.asp

> What a great loss that was.

It *is* a loss although one might quibble as to how much (after
all, everyone complains that Netscape is bloated and buggy but
forget IE's bloatedness and buggedness on Solaris -- possibly
because they've not seen it -- heck, *I* have not seen it
and am going by secondhand reports here, so who knows?).  In order
to use the de-facto industry standard browser one might have to
"upgrade" one's system to the de-facto industry standard operating
system, and possibly replace one's processor with the de-facto
industry standard microprocessor (to iNtel's credit and their
consternation, AFAIK Windows doesn't support IA-64 very well yet).

And then there are the de-facto industry-standard viruses,
trojans, and such.

Now that Bush has revealed the length of his coattails we may
have a de-facto move to implement .NET worldwide as well.
While parts of .NET *are* standard (ECMA/ISO), parts are not.

--

It's still legal to go .sigless.

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Ryan Mallo » Sat, 09 Nov 2002 02:54:14


All of a sudden there shined a shiny Matt in the middle of the road, and he
said:

Quote:> On Thu, 07 Nov 2002 at 00:31 GMT, Ryan Mallon
> spilled his alphabet soup on the floor, and the letters spelled:
>> All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle of the road, and
>> he said:
>>> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

><snip>

>> IE is semi cross platform, versions of it run on Windows, Mac and Solaris,

> Not anymore Ryan.

<nitpick>
Err, I said that versions *run* on Mac and Solaris, not that they are currently
*available*, did Microsoft make the old versions stop working? (I wouldnt be
surprised though)
</nitpick>

Quote:> http://www.microsoft.com/unix/ie/default.asp

><snip>

>> Cheers
>> Ryan

> Matt

--
/*
 * Oops. The kernel tried to access some bad page. We'll have to
 * terminate things with extreme prejudice.
*/
die_if_kernel("Oops", regs, error_code);
(From linux/arch/i386/mm/fault.c)                                  
Ryan Mallon: Registered Linux user #282325
 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Ryan Mallo » Sat, 09 Nov 2002 06:05:31


All of a sudden there shined a shiny David Dorward in the middle of the road,
and he said:


>> All of a sudden there shined a shiny Waren in the middle of the road, and
>> he said:
>>> http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/arts/reasons.html

>> Not to defend IE or anything, but it does actually do a number of those
>> things without having to fiddle with registry settings.

>> For example:
>> Syntax coloured page source: IE can specify what editor to use for viewing
>> page source, a friend using XP had an editor with coloured HTML editing.

> Isn't the list of possible editors in the registry? So you have to edit the
> registry (or have an editor that does it for you) before you can pick it?

I imagine the list of editors is stored in the registry (Isnt everything?), but
I dont think my friend had to edit the registry to get the new editor to work.
Possibly the editor itself asked if he wanted it to be set as his default HTML
reader and then updated the registry. Windows is often like that, you cant
always do something directly, especially with IE almost hardwired into the OS,
there are probably some very obscure (but not so obscure as to go registry
hunting) ways of making changes to its behaviour.

Quote:>> IE displays the content of a link tag at the bottom of the screen, (I
>> think number 4 is arguing that it doesnt).

> No it doesn't. It will display the URL of an anchor tag when you hover over
> it. A <link> tag is somewhat different. Take alook at the source of
> http://greytower.net/, you will see a number of tags like this:

>  <link rel="help"
>          title="Here you'll find more help and information"
>           href="/en/help/" />

> Mozilla will (if you pick the option in the menu) display these links in a
> toolbar.

Opps, thanks for pointing that out, I didnt know the difference between the
two. What does IE do with the <link> tags, again is there a registry setting to
get it to display them as Mozilla does?

Quote:>> IE has a bug report page, help->feedback, allows a user to report bugs
>> (both website and product bugs), make suggestions or get tecnical support.

God, Im starting to sound like a WinTroll, maybe its the exam stress ;-)

--
"If the future navigation system [for interactive networked services on
the NII] looks like something from Microsoft, it will never work."
(Chairman of Walt Disney Television & Telecommunications)
Ryan Mallon: Registered Linux user #282325

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by David Dorwar » Sat, 09 Nov 2002 11:06:12



>>  <link rel="help"
>>          title="Here you'll find more help and information"
>>           href="/en/help/" />

>> Mozilla will (if you pick the option in the menu) display these links in
>> a toolbar.
> Opps, thanks for pointing that out, I didnt know the difference between
> the two. What does IE do with the <link> tags, again is there a registry
> setting to get it to display them as Mozilla does?

It ignores them. (Well, that type of link anyway, some it uses such as style
sheet links)

--
David Dorward                                   http://david.us-lot.org/
"You cannot rewrite history, not one line."
                                      - The Doctor (Dr. Who: The Aztecs)

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Peter Karlsso » Mon, 11 Nov 2002 00:06:07


[snip]

Quote:>> IE is semi cross platform, versions of it run on Windows, Mac and Solaris,
>> granted Mozilla runs on a *lot* more though.

> Just about everyone laughed at IE on Solaris... it was so
> slow and buggy that everyone junked it.

[snip]

It sure is! Me and my collegues tried out the Solaris version at work.
Needless to say, we're still using Netscape. =)

// Peter
--
My email address is munged. Drop YOUR PANTS...
Registered GNU/Linux User # 279409 (http://counter.li.org)
"Gentoo Linux - Because I'm worth it!"

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Johan Lindquis » Mon, 11 Nov 2002 00:29:03


On l?r, 09 nov 2002 at 23:06 GMT, gazing longingly at the horizon,

felt a deep, passionate desire to let the following be known:


>> Just about everyone laughed at IE on Solaris... it was so slow and
>> buggy that everyone junked it.

> It sure is! Me and my collegues tried out the Solaris version at
> work. Needless to say, we're still using Netscape. =)

The funniest part about it when it was introduced at university, was
that the cache settings worked just like on ms windows, you set it to
a percentage of the disk space, measured in one percent steps.

Turns out one percent of the space on a huge solaris file server disk
array (designed to hold the user directories of the entire computer
science section) is quite alot of space indeed.

--
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.      Perth ---> *
 23:20:29  up  3:11,  5 users,  load average: 1.29, 1.37, 1.09
$ cat /dev/bollocks                      Registered Linux user #261729
transition web-enabled initiatives

 
 
 

101 Reasons

Post by Lin?nu » Mon, 11 Nov 2002 17:13:05


After rebooting Windows, Johan Lindquist mumbled:

Quote:>> It sure is! Me and my collegues tried out the Solaris version at
>> work. Needless to say, we're still using Netscape. =)

> The funniest part about it when it was introduced at university, was
> that the cache settings worked just like on ms windows, you set it to
> a percentage of the disk space, measured in one percent steps.

> Turns out one percent of the space on a huge solaris file server disk
> array (designed to hold the user directories of the entire computer
> science section) is quite alot of space indeed.

This is but one example of how Microsoft, in its limited experience and
with arrogant shortsightedness, continually misses the big picture, and
brags about "innovating" features that have existed for a decade or
more, while its implementations are, in one way or another, subtly
wrong.

Microsoft... bringing the desktop mindset to the server world.

Hey!

--
Microsoft... bringing the desktop mindset to the server world.

 
 
 

1. Philosophy 101: The device driver

Here's one that's had me puzzled for a long, long time,
the original old chestnut if you like...

As far as I can make out, the Unix, and Linux philosophy
in the area of device drivers, is to simply provide a
software interface to the hardware in question. This is
substantiated by inspection; the device driver generally
supports data transfer to and from the hardware via
read() and write(), and software hooks to change the
state of said hardware via ioctl().

Now, the level of abstraction _from_ the hardware is
quite minimal; abstraction, and device independance,
is provided with libraries. Libraries can have members
which provide a common software interface for hardware
which may well be dissimilar in implimentation, but
similar in function.

Obviously, if my understanding is incomplete, inaccurate,
or just plain wrong, then the remainder of this post will
be rendered nonsensical; still, I would like to hear about
it, I do want to learn...

Ok, question time, class; Why does Linux's sound driver
seek to encapsulate *all* possible sound hardware in one
device driver?

In my quite possibly ill-informed opinion, Linux _should_
have device driver support for given sound hardware
implemenations, sure - that's what device drivers seem to
be all about. But surely, bundling all sound devices into
one common model, that of dsp, mixer, and sequencer, is
a job for a sound library?

Cheers, I'd really like to see this one thrashed out,
if only for my personal education.

--

strength through elegance  ///  beauty in intelligence

2. FreeBSD IPSec/IPv6

3. 101 Things you can do I Linux but not in DOS/Win

4. how to use EXceed on win2000 with Redhat 7.3?

5. Key Electronics Midiator 101/104

6. sed question

7. Solaris 2.4 flunks Routing 101

8. The only thing Microsoft does right?

9. Problems with 2.1.101 and USMDOS

10. Networking 101 Part 2: Revenge Of Networking

11. linux on a toshiba satellite 1905-s277 (european 1900-101)

12. what is the "SIOCADDRT : Unknown Error 101 !" meaning?