The stupidest thing I've ever heard

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by whytewo » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 16:50:22



the stupidest thing I"ve ever heard was spoken by a co-worker today

"you shouldn't need to create a user ... just run as administrator"
he went on
"you should always run as administrator unless you are on a network"
{ps we do tech support for a ISP}

when cronfronted about this sence this is bad advice in linux,windows or what
ever he just waved me off like I didn't know what I was talking about
and looked shocked that you don't need admin rights to use your computer

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Simon Cook » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 17:12:52



> the stupidest thing I"ve ever heard was spoken by a co-worker today

> "you shouldn't need to create a user ... just run as administrator"
> he went on
> "you should always run as administrator unless you are on a network"
> {ps we do tech support for a ISP}

> when cronfronted about this sence this is bad advice in linux,windows
> or what ever he just waved me off like I didn't know what I was
> talking about and looked shocked that you don't need admin rights to
> use your computer

I've heard many similar things regarding system security in general; I
know of one guy who thinks that all systems should have no (or the same)
password.

Convincing him otherwise is difficult. He admits that it's useful, but
he thinks that most of the time it's just a pain in the ass that gets in
his way.

Simon

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Bo Grime » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 17:12:49



> the stupidest thing I"ve ever heard was spoken by a co-worker today

> "you shouldn't need to create a user ... just run as administrator"
> he went on
> "you should always run as administrator unless you are on a network"
> {ps we do tech support for a ISP}

> when cronfronted about this sence this is bad advice in linux,windows or
> what ever he just waved me off like I didn't know what I was talking about
> and looked shocked that you don't need admin rights to use your computer

I think admin rights are like keys.  When I was in undergraduate school
back in the mid-80s I worked in security at the headquarters of the largest
pharmaceutical company in the world as the Key Control Officer (ooooh
ahhh). :-)

One of the things I did was I made the copies of the keys for employees.  
They wanted as many keys as possible thinking this gave them more prestige.
The reality was just the opposite.  I had two keys (the great-grand master
for the Schlage and the great-grand master for the Medico (a very high
security lock)) and a security badge.  With these I could get in anywhere
in Glaxo North America.

People want as much access to a system as they can get just for prestige
reasons.

--
Bo G
Registered Linux User #276375

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Mark Style » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 17:17:32


On Mon, 08 Jul 2002 15:12:52 GMT, "Simon Cooke"


>know of one guy who thinks that all systems should have no (or the same)
>password.

>Convincing him otherwise is difficult. He admits that it's useful, but
>he thinks that most of the time it's just a pain in the ass that gets in
>his way.

Well he's right, but it's a necessary pain in the ass.
 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Bone » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 17:30:48



Quote:> "you shouldn't need to create a user ... just run as administrator"
> he went on
> "you should always run as administrator unless you are on a network"

Wow, that /is/ stupid. This person is not competent to service computers or
computer software. He/she should be fired immediately. Please don't tell me
that this person is an MCSE.

I guess the only thing worse that a air-head consultant is an air-head
employee, since you can just tell a consultant, "get lost," without legal
repercussions.

--
Bones

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by WarpKa » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 19:42:20




>> the stupidest thing I"ve ever heard was spoken by a co-worker today

>> "you shouldn't need to create a user ... just run as administrator" he
>> went on
>> "you should always run as administrator unless you are on a network"
>> {ps we do tech support for a ISP}

>> when cronfronted about this sence this is bad advice in linux,windows
>> or what ever he just waved me off like I didn't know what I was talking
>> about and looked shocked that you don't need admin rights to use your
>> computer

> I think admin rights are like keys.  When I was in undergraduate school
> back in the mid-80s I worked in security at the headquarters of the
> largest pharmaceutical company in the world as the Key Control Officer
> (ooooh ahhh). :-)

> One of the things I did was I made the copies of the keys for employees.
> They wanted as many keys as possible thinking this gave them more
> prestige. The reality was just the opposite.  I had two keys (the
> great-grand master for the Schlage and the great-grand master for the
> Medico (a very high security lock)) and a security badge.  With these I
> could get in anywhere in Glaxo North America.

> People want as much access to a system as they can get just for prestige
> reasons.

Ok, then here's a scenario.  If you're put in charge of administering a
system, do you give root priveleges to your boss?

First, he doesn't know very much about completely administering a system,
yet he can fuddle his way around as long as he doesn't disturb anything,
and he does a fairly good job at it, too, but since I've been put in
charge of maintaining the boxes, I do have to ask if it's wise for him to
also have root.

Just a thought.

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Jesse F. Hugh » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 21:23:04



> Convincing him otherwise is difficult. He admits that it's useful, but
> he thinks that most of the time it's just a pain in the ass that gets in
> his way.

He's right.  The same can be said of seatbelts, too.  The overwhelming
majority of the time, they're just in the way.  After all, only a very
small percentage of one's driving time is spent in a collision.

But, I suppose, if you find yourself experiencing one of those crisis
moments, I'd wager you prefer wearing the seatbelts than not.

(Note: Rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts may replace this analogy with
parachutes for fighter pilots.)

His problem is that he's merely comparing the likelihood of an adverse
occurrence, but not taking into account the severity of the outcome.
Baby decision theory would suggest that we multiply the utility by the
probability.

--
Jesse Hughes    "I AM serious about this being a short route to a Ph.d
for some of you, but just remember, I'm the guy who proved Fermat's
Last Theorem in just a bit over 6 years [...]  My standards are kind
of high."  --James Harris, founding a new mathematical school

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Paul Cook » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 22:52:39



> the stupidest thing I"ve ever heard was spoken by a co-worker today

> "you shouldn't need to create a user ... just run as administrator"
> he went on
> "you should always run as administrator unless you are on a network"
> {ps we do tech support for a ISP}

> when cronfronted about this sence this is bad advice in linux,windows or
> what ever he just waved me off like I didn't know what I was talking about
> and looked shocked that you don't need admin rights to use your computer

fer heck's sake... that's almost but not quite as stupid as giving a live
hand grenade to a baby to play with...

--
Paul Cooke
  Registered Linux user 273897 Machine registration number 156819
  Linux Counter: Home Page = http://counter.li.org/

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Simon Cook » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 22:07:34



> (Note: Rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts may replace this analogy with
> parachutes for fighter pilots.)

The thing is, having learned to drive in the UK, putting on a seatbelt
and using my turn signal when I make a turn are automatic -- no thought
involved.

I find the concept of rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts... well... nuts....

Si

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Jesse F. Hugh » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 22:32:51




> > (Note: Rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts may replace this analogy with
> > parachutes for fighter pilots.)

> The thing is, having learned to drive in the UK, putting on a seatbelt
> and using my turn signal when I make a turn are automatic -- no thought
> involved.

> I find the concept of rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts... well... nuts....

The motivations seem to be twofold.  First, there is the libertarian
perspective that whether I risk injury to myself or not is not the
gov't's business.  Second, many folks seem to exaggerate the risk of
an automotive accident involving water, when a timely escape may be
more important than restraints.

I don't intend to enter any libertarian discussions here.  I merely
represent opposing viewpoints so that Simon understands my
parenthetical remark.

--
Jesse Hughes
"She moaned, in pain and pleasure, as, in a confused whirlwind, she
glimpsed an image of Saint Sebastian riddled with arrows, crucified
and impaled."               --Mario Vargas Llosa on category theory

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by GeneralP » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 22:48:21


On 08 Jul 2002 22:32:51 +0200, Jesse F. Hughes assert()ed:



>> > (Note: Rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts may replace this analogy with
>> > parachutes for fighter pilots.)

>> The thing is, having learned to drive in the UK, putting on a seatbelt
>> and using my turn signal when I make a turn are automatic -- no thought
>> involved.

>> I find the concept of rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts... well... nuts....

> The motivations seem to be twofold.  First, there is the libertarian
> perspective that whether I risk injury to myself or not is not the
> gov't's business.  Second, many folks seem to exaggerate the risk of
> an automotive accident involving water, when a timely escape may be
> more important than restraints.

> I don't intend to enter any libertarian discussions here.  I merely
> represent opposing viewpoints so that Simon understands my
> parenthetical remark.

Seatbelts are an easy one in Canada -- they're the law, because if you
don't use one, the gov't (i.e. taxpayers) have to foot the bill for your
extra injuries.

I'll bet insurance companies would make seatbelts mandatory if they could.

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Marcello Barbon » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 23:14:51



> Seatbelts are an easy one in Canada -- they're the law, because if you
> don't use one, the gov't (i.e. taxpayers) have to foot the bill for your
> extra injuries.

Same here (Italy). And same goes for mandatory helmet on motorcycles.
 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Jan » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 23:36:22




>> Seatbelts are an easy one in Canada -- they're the law, because if you
>> don't use one, the gov't (i.e. taxpayers) have to foot the bill for your
>> extra injuries.

> Same here (Italy).

and here (belgium)

Quote:> And same goes for mandatory helmet on motorcycles.

ditto
 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Tim Beckha » Tue, 09 Jul 2002 23:50:07




Quote:>> Convincing him otherwise is difficult. He admits that it's useful, but
>> he thinks that most of the time it's just a pain in the ass that gets in
>> his way.

>He's right.  The same can be said of seatbelts, too

I was in an accident once, involving a head-on collision with a
concrete wall.  My chest and waist bore bruises in the exact pattern
of the seat belts I was wearing.  The creepy thing is -- my chest also
hit the steering column - leaving another bruise, but no permanent
harm.  I often think of what would have happened, had I not been
wearing the seatbelts, and I had hit the steering column with the full
force of the collision.

So I believe in seat belts - and passwords - and logging on as a
non-root user.

 
 
 

The stupidest thing I've ever heard

Post by Russ » Wed, 10 Jul 2002 02:59:10



> On 08 Jul 2002 22:32:51 +0200, Jesse F. Hughes assert()ed:


>>> > (Note: Rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts may replace this analogy with
>>> > parachutes for fighter pilots.)

>>> The thing is, having learned to drive in the UK, putting on a seatbelt
>>> and using my turn signal when I make a turn are automatic -- no thought
>>> involved.

>>> I find the concept of rabidly anti-seatbelt nuts... well... nuts....

>> The motivations seem to be twofold.  First, there is the libertarian
>> perspective that whether I risk injury to myself or not is not the
>> gov't's business.  Second, many folks seem to exaggerate the risk of
>> an automotive accident involving water, when a timely escape may be
>> more important than restraints.

>> I don't intend to enter any libertarian discussions here.  I merely
>> represent opposing viewpoints so that Simon understands my
>> parenthetical remark.

> Seatbelts are an easy one in Canada -- they're the law, because if you
> don't use one, the gov't (i.e. taxpayers) have to foot the bill for your
> extra injuries.

> I'll bet insurance companies would make seatbelts mandatory if they could.

Why foot the bill for someone stupid enough to not wear seatbelts? Let
natural selection do its thing. Same for helmets on motorcycles. You don't
wear a helmet, you pay the whole bill. I'm sure Canada has some ships in
Artic service that need someone to chip paint. Just in case you don't have
any money.
--
Russ Lyttle - Not powered by ActiveX
Please visit <http://home.earthlink.net> for OBD-II
information and links.
 
 
 

1. CMS Jumbo tape backup: I've heard bad things, are they true?

I am considering purchase of a Colorado Memory Systems "Jumbo 250" tape
backup unit for use in my IBM PS/1 (model E43).  The Ftape-HOWTO indicates
that this unit works with 'ftape' and that the DOS-based tape formatting
software that comes with the unit can be used to format tapes.  I can buy
the unit from a local dealer for ~$300.  This would seem to be a decent
option.

That said, others who have used the Jumbo units under DOS have warned me
off and there seems to be an undercurrent in comp.sys.ibm.pc.* groups
of people having run into "problems" of various sorts.

Can anyone with "war stories" to share about running Jumbo units plus
Linux (and optionally plus an IBM PS/1) let me know something of their
experiences?

Thanks.

-Peter

--
-- I am Peter Rukavina at the PEI Crafts Council, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada  --
  Telephone at work (902) 566-1584, fax (902) 628-8740, at home (902) 368-2871

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