Unauthorized COLA FAQ 5/5 23-Jun-2002

Unauthorized COLA FAQ 5/5 23-Jun-2002

Post by Kenneth Down » Mon, 24 Jun 2002 21:57:05



#
#  Changes 23-jun-2002.  Removed a paragraph from 5.0 that said this
#   stuff was all for section 2, as that is not really true anymore,
#   this section is just a general holding pen for undeveloped material
#   for any section.
#
#  Lots of stuff has been developed and moved into Section 2.  See
#  notes on individual sections below.
#
          ============================================================

                           TABLE OF CONTENTS - PART 5

          5.0   Part 5, Undeveloped Material

             5.1.0.0      Get a REAL Operating System!
             5.2.0.0      Pretty Pictures
             5.4.0.0      Some linux-specific implementations or
                             technologies
             5.5.0.0      The GNU Tools
             5.5.0.0      Potpouri

          ============================================================

      Copyright (c)  2002.  This document is copyright by the individuals
      named in the credits, section 1.4.0.0.

      Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
      under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1
      or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.
      A copy of the license can be viewed at:

                      http://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl.txt

          ============================================================

5.0  Undeveloped Material

  This section of the FAQ contains suggestions, comments, and
  so forth that have yet to be developed into actual finished
  material.

5.x.x.x  The GPL Attacks Intellectual Property.

  ITEM:  We have some coverage of MS's attacks on the GPL, but
         it seems we might develop it further and put it into
         the "Common Misconceptions" section.  Points to cover:

         -> What is IP?  Point out US Consitutional and legal
            definitions.  

         -> Distinguish copyright, patent, trademark, etc.

         -> How the GPL protects copyright holders.

5.x.x.x  Linux really is not that secure (for Common Misconceptions
         part of the faq).

  ITEM:  This link is a good source for some of the nonsense
         we have been hearing:

         http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2002/2/12/61225/8865

5.1.0.0  Get a REAL Operating System!

#
#  Very exciting!  Edgar Allen has provided text to several points
#    here, so some of the items have been moved into Section 2.
#
#  this section now maps to section 2.8.0.0 of Part 2, as items
#    are developed, they will be removed from here and put there.
#

  A section generally describing the unix nature of Linux, and
  why this is good.  

  ITEM:  Total Control at the CLI

  ITEM:  Text configuration files

  ITEM:  Pipes

  ITEM:  Logs

  ITEM:  Security.  Simple and powerful.

  ITEM:  CRON

  ITEM:  Combinations.  Pipes + CLI = command-line emailing

  ITEM:  GUI is optional.  (maybe as a subset of layered architecture)

  ITEM:  Remote X

  ITEM:  scripting shell, like bash

  ITEM:  regular expressions

5.2.0.0  Pretty Pictures

  More nifty discussion of KDE, GNOME, the whole X system,
  and how Linux has got enough eye-candy to give you
  eye-tooth-decay (or something like that).

5.4.0.0  Some linux-specific implementations or technologies

  ITEM:  iptables and ipchains

5.5.0.0  The GNU Tools

#
#  this section now maps to section 2.9.0.0 of Part 2, as items
#    are developed, they will be removed from here and put there.
#

  An ode to the GNU implementations of some old unix standards

  ITEM:  tar, gzip

5.5.0.0  Potpouri

#
#  this section now maps to section 2.99.0.0 of Part 2, as items
#    are developed, they will be removed from here and put there.
#

  Uncategorized things that are cool about Linux

  ITEM:  Humor.  You'll never see a commercial shop improve a program
         called "more" and name the result "less".  You'll never see them
         call the improved  Bourne shell the "Bourne-Again Shell."  Or
         naming the mail alerting program 'biff' because the guy who wrote
         it lived in the dorm at Berkeley and the dog which barked only at
         the mailman, no one else, was named Biff.

  ITEM:  Community.  Can't be beat.  Even with the god-awful antics on
         COLA, you meet some really good people.

  ITEM:  Real alternatives to conventional thinking.  Why replace Office?
         Why not deconstruct needs and get proper tools for the things you
         are trying to squash into Word?  

--
Ken
Linux, the more you learn, the more you love

 
 
 

Unauthorized COLA FAQ 5/5 23-Jun-2002

Post by Mike » Wed, 26 Jun 2002 21:41:18




Quote:>  ITEM:  Remote X

   The X Window System [is this designation Correct?] was designed with
   network-transparency in mind. This is the reason for the term "X
   server" - because that is exactly what it is.  The X server itself
   provides a display, keyboard, and a pointing device; "X clients" are
   the programs which communicate with the X server, and incudes the
   Window Manager as well as all the programs you run that provide you
   with a GUI.

   This doesn't make any difference for the common case, where the
   X server is running on the same machine as the clients; such as your
   typical desktop. However, it gives an incredible amount of power and
   flexibility if you have access to another computer with X clients
   available: you can run the program on the remote system, and have it
   displayed on your desktop, as if it were running on your own
   computer. Provided the network connection is fast enough, you won't
   be able to tell the difference between running a local or a remote
   copy of the program.

   It gets even better: the X11 protocol is not linux-specific, so you
   can run UNIX programs that display on your linux desktop (as just one
   example). There even exists X servers for Windows -- in fact, XFree86
   itself can be convinced to run on Windows -- so you can show your
   Linux apps on your Windows desktop if you want to.

   But you're not restricted to simply running a few specific programs
   on another system; it's quite possible (and easy!) to get a complete
   graphical login -- just like you get if you install a modern Linux
   distribution and have it start in "graphics mode" -- on a remote
   machine.  A complete GNOME or KDE (or any other) desktop session that
   is on another machine!  This is perfect for situations where you have
   a powerful central server, with various small (or "thin") clients;
   generally referred to as "X terminals".

   With the widespread adoption of broadband, it becomes quite feasible
   to go to university (for example), and get a complete desktop session
   on your computer at home right there in front of you -- even if
   somebody else happens to be using your computer at the time.
   Remember, Linux is actually a multi-user operating system!
--
Mike.  /* remove "-spam" to mail me */

 
 
 

Unauthorized COLA FAQ 5/5 23-Jun-2002

Post by Edgar All » Sat, 29 Jun 2002 05:17:51


    I tried marking the changes I would like to see in this but it
    became so ugly that I submit them already reformatted:

Quote:>>  ITEM:  Remote X

   The X Window System was designed with network-transparency in
   mind. This is the reason for the term "X server" - because that
   is exactly what it is.  The X server itself provides a display,
   keyboard, and a pointing device; "X clients" are the programs
   which communicate with the X server, and includes the Window
   Manager as well as all the programs you run that provide you with
   a GUI.

   This doesn't make any difference for the common case, where the
   X server is running on the same machine as the clients; such as
   your typical desktop.  However, it gives an incredible amount of
   power and flexibility if you have access to another computer
   with X clients available: you can run the program on the remote
   system, and have it displayed on your desktop, as if it were
   running on your own computer.  Provided the network connection
   is fast enough, you won't be able to tell the difference between
   running a local or a remote copy of the program.

   You can interact with machines in several remote locations at the
   same time.

   You can send the X protocol through an encrypted pipe to provide
   privacy even across insecure paths like the Internet.

   It gets even better: the X11 protocol is not Linux-specific, so
   you can run UNIX or mainframe programs which display on your
   Linux desktop as well as native ones.

   X servers for Windows are available as both commercial and free
   programs -- in fact, XFree86 itself can be convinced to run on
   Windows -- so you can display your Linux apps on your Windows
   desktop if you want to and your Windows apps can be displayed on
   a Linux desktop via a program named 'vnc'.

   But you're not restricted to simply running a few specific
   programs on another system; it's quite possible (and easy!) to
   get a remote machine to provide a graphical login -- just like
   you get if you install a modern Linux distribution and have it
   start in "graphics mode" on your local machine.

   A complete GNOME or KDE (or any other) desktop session that is
   on a remote machine perhaps thousands of miles away !

   This is perfect for situations where you remotely share work
   on a project or have everyone in an office sharing a powerful
   central server, with various small (or "thin") clients; generally
   referred to as "X terminals" instead of paying more for
   individual, less powerful, machines.

   With the widespread adoption of broadband, it becomes quite
   feasible to connect to university (for example), and get a
   complete desktop session on your computer at home right there in
   front of you -- even if you are already running X on your desktop --
   because you can run multiple X servers at the same time (switching
   between them with function keys).

   Each server can have separate resolution, one can run at 1024x768
   while another runs at 1600x1200.  Switching between resolutions
   with Ctrl-Alt-'+' and Ctrl-Alt-'-'.

   Remember, Linux was designed as a multi-user operating system and
   it takes full advantage of that added power.

--
Knowledge comes, but wisdom stays.            --- Alfred Lord Tennyson 1809
What was once thought can never be unthought. --- Friedrich Durrenmatt 1921
Here is your copy of the source.       Feel free to grow all you want.

 
 
 

Unauthorized COLA FAQ 5/5 23-Jun-2002

Post by Mike » Sat, 29 Jun 2002 09:40:41




Quote:> I tried marking the changes I would like to see in this but it became
> so ugly that I submit them already reformatted:

Much nicer.  Cheers. :-)
--
Mike.  /* remove "-spam" to mail me */