"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by T.G. Reape » Mon, 23 Dec 2002 12:49:18



*************************************************

This Link recently solved an "undeletable" file issue on W2K:

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_undeletable_file.htm

Open a Command Prompt window and leave it open.
Close all open programs.?
Click Start, Run and enter TASKMGR.EXE??
Go to the Processes tab and End Process on Explorer.exe.??
Leave Task Manager?open.?

Go back to the Command Prompt window and change to the directory the AVI
(or other undeletable file) is located in.?

At the command prompt type DEL <filename>?
Go back to Task Manager,
click File, New Task and enter EXPLORER.EXE to restart the GUI shell.?
Close Task Manager.

*************************************************

Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

The only thing that fixed it was this:

________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

From Single user mode.
________________________________________________________________________

*************************************************

In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
partition.

Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
during next boot.

--
Cheers
T.G. Reaper
No Virus file is attached.
Some broken news readers will indicate there is.
**************************************************
begin  Nimda.Txt.Vbs

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Joel Maye » Mon, 23 Dec 2002 13:38:12


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begin  message.txt


> In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
> wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
> it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
> partition.

> Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
> during next boot.

You are comparing recovering from a damaged file system,
to removing a file broken GUI tools won't let you delete?

not a fair comparison

end

If you can not read this message it is because you are using poorly
written mail or news software, for example Microsoft Outlook/Outlook
Express.

Please upgrade to standards compliant software

- --
jmayes at       |  Sourcemage GNU/Linux
sourcemage.org  |  Grimoire Guru for x11 and doc
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"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Jim Richardso » Mon, 23 Dec 2002 19:58:42


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 02:49:18 -0800,

Quote:

> *************************************************

> This Link recently solved an "undeletable" file issue on W2K:

> http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_undeletable_file.htm

> Open a Command Prompt window and leave it open.
> Close all open programs.?
> Click Start, Run and enter TASKMGR.EXE??
> Go to the Processes tab and End Process on Explorer.exe.??
> Leave Task Manager?open.?

> Go back to the Command Prompt window and change to the directory the AVI
> (or other undeletable file) is located in.?

> At the command prompt type DEL <filename>?
> Go back to Task Manager,
> click File, New Task and enter EXPLORER.EXE to restart the GUI shell.?
> Close Task Manager.

> *************************************************

> Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
> nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

> The only thing that fixed it was this:

What was the filename? ls -ls will not show hidden files. You need the
- -a flag for that.

Out of curiousity, how did the file break?

 ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
> reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

> From Single user mode.
> ________________________________________________________________________

> *************************************************

> In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
> wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
> it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
> partition.

> Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
> during next boot.

Why would you need to do this again? what's breaking?

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--
Jim Richardson         http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
A bad day, is when aliens attack, the dog bites you, and your boss tells
 you that the new client wants to make a few changes before delivery.
Linux, super computers, office computers, or home computers, it works.

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by GreyClou » Mon, 23 Dec 2002 21:16:02



> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1

> On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 02:49:18 -0800,

> > *************************************************

> > This Link recently solved an "undeletable" file issue on W2K:

> > http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_undeletable_file.htm

> > Open a Command Prompt window and leave it open.
> > Close all open programs.
> > Click Start, Run and enter TASKMGR.EXE
> > Go to the Processes tab and End Process on Explorer.exe.
> > Leave Task Manager open.

> > Go back to the Command Prompt window and change to the directory the AVI
> > (or other undeletable file) is located in.

> > At the command prompt type DEL <filename>
> > Go back to Task Manager,
> > click File, New Task and enter EXPLORER.EXE to restart the GUI shell.
> > Close Task Manager.

> > *************************************************

> > Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
> > nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

> > The only thing that fixed it was this:

> What was the filename? ls -ls will not show hidden files. You need the
> - -a flag for that.

> Out of curiousity, how did the file break?

>  ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

> > reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
> > reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

> > From Single user mode.
> > ________________________________________________________________________

> > *************************************************

> > In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
> > wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
> > it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
> > partition.

> > Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
> > during next boot.

> Why would you need to do this again? what's breaking?

Somehow I find the whole incident bogus.  I've never had a
problem with files on either windows or Linux/UNIX.
 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by T.G. Reape » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 00:06:38



> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1

> begin  message.txt


>> In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
>> wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
>> it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
>> partition.

>> Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
>> during next boot.

> You are comparing recovering from a damaged file system,
> to removing a file broken GUI tools won't let you delete?

> not a fair comparison

> end

Oh yeah, when the outcome is favorable to YYOS, and your supporting XXOS
then the comparison is obviously unfair.

Good tactic, not a lot of credibility...but wadda ya gonna do.

--
Cheers T.G.
Interesting Sig to be placed here soon.
*********Reaper At Debug1 . com********
_______________________________________

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by S C Rigle » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 03:58:50



> Oh yeah, when the outcome is favorable to YYOS, and your supporting XXOS
> then the comparison is obviously unfair.

> Good tactic, not a lot of credibility...but wadda ya gonna do.

What do you mean?  A deficiency in the GUI kept you from being able
to delete a file in Windows.  How does that equate to recovering
a corrupted file in Linux?  Apple and oranges.

-S

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Ryan Mallo » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 06:40:22


All of a sudden there shined a shiny T.G. Reaper in the middle of the road, and
 he said:

Quote:

> *************************************************

> This Link recently solved an "undeletable" file issue on W2K:

> http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_undeletable_file.htm

> Open a Command Prompt window and leave it open.
> Close all open programs.?
> Click Start, Run and enter TASKMGR.EXE??
> Go to the Processes tab and End Process on Explorer.exe.??
> Leave Task Manager?open.?

> Go back to the Command Prompt window and change to the directory the AVI
> (or other undeletable file) is located in.?

> At the command prompt type DEL <filename>?
> Go back to Task Manager,
> click File, New Task and enter EXPLORER.EXE to restart the GUI shell.?
> Close Task Manager.

I have seen a similar problem (or trick) with undeleteable filenames which
include the ascii 255 character, the file was created from the command prompt
and had the character embedded in the name (by pressing ALT-2-5-5). The dir
command showed the file, but the offending character cannot be detected.
Attempting to delete the file either by name (less the trick character) or by
using wildcards fails, as does any attempt at delelting it from the GUI, you
are given a "file no found" error. I seen the trick done with Windows 98, but
I believe it has now been fixed with Win2k/NTFS, it was a good trick to play on
school computers though.

Quote:> *************************************************

> Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
> nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

How about "ls -la", which shows hidden files. How do you know something is
there if you cannot see it?

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> The only thing that fixed it was this:

> ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

> reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
> reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

> From Single user mode.
> ________________________________________________________________________

> *************************************************

> In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
> wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
> it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
> partition.

If you have /var mounted on a separately from the root filesystem you could
have unmounted it and then run the check.

Quote:> Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
> during next boot.

And if you werent planning on rebooting? Server installs often have each of
the core filesystems like /var /usr and /home mounted independandly so that
file system checks can be done without bringing the system down.  

You are assuming that the fix you found (which appears overkill) was the
optimal solution, given your lack of detail and incorrect attempt to list all
files in a directory I would hazzard a guess that there was possibly a better
way. How did you know the file was gone afterwards, "ls -ls"?

To me, the Linux method (that you propose) while perhaps archaic to a degree,
at least makes sense. You do a fsck pass to fix errors and then a second to
rebuild the tree, the syntax shouldnt really be a problem, its all explained
in the man/info pages. On the other hand, the Windows method given above is
just plain weird. Why on earth do you need to close explorer to delete a file?

--
"And the next time you consider complaining that running Lucid Emacs
19.05 via NFS from a remote Linux machine in Paraguay doesn't seem to
get the background colors right, you'll know who to thank."
(By Matt Welsh)
Ryan Mallon: Registered Linux user #282325

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Jim Richardso » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 10:00:17


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 11:16:02 -0800,



>> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>> Hash: SHA1

>> On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 02:49:18 -0800,

>> > *************************************************

>> > This Link recently solved an "undeletable" file issue on W2K:

>> > http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_undeletable_file.htm

>> > Open a Command Prompt window and leave it open.
>> > Close all open programs.
>> > Click Start, Run and enter TASKMGR.EXE
>> > Go to the Processes tab and End Process on Explorer.exe.
>> > Leave Task Manager open.

>> > Go back to the Command Prompt window and change to the directory the AVI
>> > (or other undeletable file) is located in.

>> > At the command prompt type DEL <filename>
>> > Go back to Task Manager,
>> > click File, New Task and enter EXPLORER.EXE to restart the GUI shell.
>> > Close Task Manager.

>> > *************************************************

>> > Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
>> > nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

>> > The only thing that fixed it was this:

>> What was the filename? ls -ls will not show hidden files. You need the
>> - -a flag for that.

>> Out of curiousity, how did the file break?

>>  ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

>> > reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
>> > reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

>> > From Single user mode.
>> > ________________________________________________________________________

>> > *************************************************

>> > In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
>> > wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
>> > it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
>> > partition.

>> > Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
>> > during next boot.

>> Why would you need to do this again? what's breaking?

> Somehow I find the whole incident bogus.  I've never had a
> problem with files on either windows or Linux/UNIX.

Oh, I had a problem with a reiserfs partition once (at least I think it
was reiserfs) I had the drive in a hot swap bay, and since I am used to
SCSI hot swaps, figured all I had to do was unmount, and pop the drive
out, and put a new one in... Unfortunately, ide doesn't work that way...
in that case I wound up with filenames of 3000+ characters, and sizes
that claimed 4GB for multiple files, on a 20GB disk... one reformat
later... Still, I class that one as a pebkac error, I just assumed that
hotswap capable ide hd chassis, meant that I could hot swap it...

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--
Jim Richardson         http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
A bad day, is when aliens attack, the dog bites you, and your boss tells
 you that the new client wants to make a few changes before delivery.
Linux, super computers, office computers, or home computers, it works.

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by T.G. Reape » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 21:32:21


On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 09:58:42 -0800, Jim Richardson


>> *************************************************

>> Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
>> nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

>> The only thing that fixed it was this:

>What was the filename?

Several, one was interest.lst I believe.

Quote:>ls -ls will not show hidden files. You need the
>- -a flag for that.

Not hidden, no unusual attributes at all.

Quote:>Out of curiousity, how did the file break?

Power Failure during a storm, lockup during perl scrip debugging, I
don't know.

Quote:> ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

>> reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
>> reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

>> From Single user mode.
>> ________________________________________________________________________

>> *************************************************

>> In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
>> wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
>> it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
>> partition.

>> Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
>> during next boot.

>Why would you need to do this again? what's breaking?

I hope I don't have to do it again.

The comment referred to the fact that I could have told W2K to:
"chkdsk -swtches C:" and it would have prevented me from checking a
live system volume just as Linux did. But...W2K would have given me
the option of automatically having the command issued at next boot.

--
Cheers
T.G. Reaper
***********

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by GreyClou » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 21:53:39



> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1

> On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 11:16:02 -0800,


> >> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> >> Hash: SHA1

> >> On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 02:49:18 -0800,

> >> > *************************************************

> >> > This Link recently solved an "undeletable" file issue on W2K:

> >> > http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_undeletable_file.htm

> >> > Open a Command Prompt window and leave it open.
> >> > Close all open programs.
> >> > Click Start, Run and enter TASKMGR.EXE
> >> > Go to the Processes tab and End Process on Explorer.exe.
> >> > Leave Task Manager open.

> >> > Go back to the Command Prompt window and change to the directory the AVI
> >> > (or other undeletable file) is located in.

> >> > At the command prompt type DEL <filename>
> >> > Go back to Task Manager,
> >> > click File, New Task and enter EXPLORER.EXE to restart the GUI shell.
> >> > Close Task Manager.

> >> > *************************************************

> >> > Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
> >> > nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

> >> > The only thing that fixed it was this:

> >> What was the filename? ls -ls will not show hidden files. You need the
> >> - -a flag for that.

> >> Out of curiousity, how did the file break?

> >>  ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

> >> > reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
> >> > reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

> >> > From Single user mode.
> >> > ________________________________________________________________________

> >> > *************************************************

> >> > In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
> >> > wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
> >> > it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
> >> > partition.

> >> > Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
> >> > during next boot.

> >> Why would you need to do this again? what's breaking?

> > Somehow I find the whole incident bogus.  I've never had a
> > problem with files on either windows or Linux/UNIX.

> Oh, I had a problem with a reiserfs partition once (at least I think it
> was reiserfs) I had the drive in a hot swap bay, and since I am used to
> SCSI hot swaps, figured all I had to do was unmount, and pop the drive
> out, and put a new one in... Unfortunately, ide doesn't work that way...
> in that case I wound up with filenames of 3000+ characters, and sizes
> that claimed 4GB for multiple files, on a 20GB disk... one reformat
> later... Still, I class that one as a pebkac error, I just assumed that
> hotswap capable ide hd chassis, meant that I could hot swap it...

Oh that problem.  Solaris has the hot swap capability
without the hassles... just that the hard drive bay has to
engineered to be unpluggable while power is still applied.
They aren't that cheap either.  I read a few squawks over in
alt.solaris.x86 about this.
John Groenveld is the guy that knows a lot about this stuff.
 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Jon Portno » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 22:34:40



> On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 09:58:42 -0800, Jim Richardson

>>> *************************************************

>>> Personally I had an issue with a file name I could not overwrite, create,
>>> nor delete, because it did *not* show up from "#> ls -ls"

>>> The only thing that fixed it was this:

>>What was the filename?

> Several, one was interest.lst I believe.

>>ls -ls will not show hidden files. You need the
>>- -a flag for that.

> Not hidden, no unusual attributes at all.

>>Out of curiousity, how did the file break?

> Power Failure during a storm, lockup during perl scrip debugging, I
> don't know.

>> ________________ Repair Reiser file system /var:  ______________________

>>> reiserfsck --fix-fixable --logfile checklog /dev/ataraid/d0p2
>>> reiserfsck --rebuild-tree /dev/ataraid/d0p2

>>> From Single user mode.
>>> ________________________________________________________________________

>>> *************************************************

>>> In terms of degree of difficulty the Linux method is prehistoric. It
>>> wasn't enough that I was able to *find* the reiserfsck command, and learn
>>> it's arcane syntax, I couldn't even issue it as root to check the /var
>>> partition.

>>> Windows would have at least offered to issue the command for me
>>> during next boot.

>>Why would you need to do this again? what's breaking?

> I hope I don't have to do it again.

> The comment referred to the fact that I could have told W2K to:
> "chkdsk -swtches C:" and it would have prevented me from checking a
> live system volume just as Linux did. But...W2K would have given me
> the option of automatically having the command issued at next boot.

From the man page for shutdown(8):

       -F     Force fsck on reboot.

--
Jon Portnoy

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Simon Cook » Mon, 30 Dec 2002 12:08:40



Quote:> I have seen a similar problem (or trick) with undeleteable filenames
> which include the ascii 255 character, the file was created from the
> command prompt and had the character embedded in the name (by
> pressing ALT-2-5-5). The dir command showed the file, but the
> offending character cannot be detected. Attempting to delete the file
> either by name (less the trick character) or by using wildcards
> fails, as does any attempt at delelting it from the GUI, you are
> given a "file no found" error. I seen the trick done with Windows 98,
> but I believe it has now been fixed with Win2k/NTFS, it was a good
> trick to play on school computers though.

You could probably play similar tricks on any Unicode-enabled filesystem
by using glyphs which map to identical characters onscreen, but have
different underlying codes.

As ever, yes, it's a trick. Alt+255 looks like a space on-screen, but
isn't.

Simon

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Lee Sau Da » Fri, 03 Jan 2003 09:56:29


    Simon> You could probably play similar tricks on any
    Simon> Unicode-enabled filesystem by using glyphs which map to
    Simon> identical characters onscreen, but have different
    Simon> underlying codes.

I'm afraid you're confusing "glyph" with "character".

    Simon> As ever, yes, it's a trick. Alt+255 looks like a space
    Simon> on-screen, but isn't.

It is!  It's called a "hard space", still a kind of space.

--


Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee

 
 
 

"Undeletable Files in Windows 2000 && Linux.

Post by Simon Cook » Fri, 03 Jan 2003 13:11:52




>     Simon> You could probably play similar tricks on any
>     Simon> Unicode-enabled filesystem by using glyphs which map to
>     Simon> identical characters onscreen, but have different
>     Simon> underlying codes.

> I'm afraid you're confusing "glyph" with "character".

Yup. I got them swapped in that post.

Quote:

>     Simon> As ever, yes, it's a trick. Alt+255 looks like a space
>     Simon> on-screen, but isn't.

> It is!  It's called a "hard space", still a kind of space.

Maybe I should have been clearer. Alt+255 looks like a space character
(ASCII 32, code = SP), but isn't.

Simon