How do you tell the advocates apart ?

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cfswester » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 06:59:05



After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
for example

2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the kernel

4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
world and China

Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell who
is who without a scorecard ?

 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cybea » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 07:44:15



> After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
> Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
> posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

> 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
> for example

> 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

> 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
> kernel

> 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
> world and China

> Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell who
> is who without a scorecard ?

I think you should add

Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cfswester » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 07:51:30




> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
> > for example

> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
> > kernel

> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
> > world and China

> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell
who
> > is who without a scorecard ?

> I think you should add

> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by Paul Cook » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 09:49:07






>> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the
>> > real
>> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
>> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

>> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like
>> > myself for example

>> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

>> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
>> > kernel

>> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
>> > world and China

>> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell
> who
>> > is who without a scorecard ?

>> I think you should add

>> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
>> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
>> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

> Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

where did he mention Microsoft???

--
Paul Cooke
  Registered Linux user 273897 Machine registration number 156819
  Linux Counter: Home Page = http://counter.li.org/

 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cybea » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 09:07:57






>> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the
>> > real
>> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
>> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

>> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like
>> > myself for example

>> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

>> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
>> > kernel

>> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
>> > world and China

>> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell
> who
>> > is who without a scorecard ?

>> I think you should add

>> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
>> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
>> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

> Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

Do you always have to read microsift into every statement?

I did not say Microsoft. For a long time I considered IBM because I
considered them to be a monopolistic companies trying to control the
computer market by eliminating companies that offer other choices. Perhaps
OS was not the best word but it is a *current* issue. I also currently have
problems with Cisco as well as MS. Also if you read what I said, I talked
about *CHOICE*. Liking choice has nothing to do with MS unless you believe
MS is anti-choice, Hmmm? So you claim about "everything..." Is false on
that point alone.

I apologize for making my statement about monopolistic companies sound so
narrow. I was afraid if I made it as broad as I feel about monopolies I
would not have been able to make my point. So let me restate:

Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have *choice* on how they can use
computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control any aspect
of the computer market by eliminating companies that offer other choices.
For me, I don't like Cisco, MS and to a lesser extent Intel.

 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cfswester » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 09:17:43







> >> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the
> >> > real
> >> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many
overall
> >> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four
categories:

> >> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like
> >> > myself for example

> >> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

> >> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
> >> > kernel

> >> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the
free
> >> > world and China

> >> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to
tell
> > who
> >> > is who without a scorecard ?

> >> I think you should add

> >> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
> >> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
> >> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

> > Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

> where did he mention Microsoft???

> --
> Paul Cooke
>   Registered Linux user 273897 Machine registration number 156819
>   Linux Counter: Home Page = http://counter.li.org/

What did IBM and Intel do that was so wrong ?  Sell stuff ?
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by Jeff » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 09:19:28






>> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
>> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
>> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

>> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
>> > for example

>> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

>> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
>> > kernel

>> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
>> > world and China

>> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell
> who
>> > is who without a scorecard ?

>> I think you should add

>> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
>> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
>> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

> Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

What is you interest in this NG? Do you just not have anything better to
do with your life? Is there nothing to advocate about in the Microsoft ot
MAC NG's?
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cfswester » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 09:28:02







> >> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the
real
> >> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many
overall
> >> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four
categories:

> >> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like
myself
> >> > for example

> >> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

> >> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
> >> > kernel

> >> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the
free
> >> > world and China

> >> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to
tell
> > who
> >> > is who without a scorecard ?

> >> I think you should add

> >> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
> >> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
> >> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

> > Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

> What is you interest in this NG? Do you just not have anything better to
> do with your life? Is there nothing to advocate about in the Microsoft ot
> MAC NG's?

My interest is that Linux fascinates me.  And there is a reasonable chance
that it may take off and be the next eBay. Not that it matters in the
overall scheme of  things but I just happen to think that WindowsXP is ugly
and clunky compared to Windows98/SE/ME.  And furthermore I think that 3D is
going to game consoles or SIG type computing systems and the future for
information technology is actually going to 2D.  Now what is your interest ?
Oh, never mind, I don't care.
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cybea » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:14:56









>> >> > After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the
>> >> > real
>> >> > Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many
> overall
>> >> > posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four
> categories:

>> >> > 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like
>> >> > myself for example

>> >> > 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

>> >> > 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
>> >> > kernel

>> >> > 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the
> free
>> >> > world and China

>> >> > Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to
> tell
>> > who
>> >> > is who without a scorecard ?

>> >> I think you should add

>> >> Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
>> >> computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
>> >> market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

>> > Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

>> where did he mention Microsoft???

>> --
>> Paul Cooke
>>   Registered Linux user 273897 Machine registration number 156819
>>   Linux Counter: Home Page = http://counter.li.org/

> What did IBM and Intel do that was so wrong ?  Sell stuff ?

Ever hear of IBM being investigated for being an Illegal Monopoly and
signing an agreement that  reformed the way IBM did business? It's been
discussed here in this news group duiring the time you have been here. I
don't think I need to repeat it again.
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cfswester » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:24:41



Quote:

> Ever hear of IBM being investigated for being an Illegal Monopoly and
> signing an agreement that  reformed the way IBM did business? It's been
> discussed here in this news group duiring the time you have been here. I
> don't think I need to repeat it again.

You do not need to repeat anything for my benefit. I do not live in the past
century. I am only interested in forming an educated opinion on which way
these bits and bytes are heading in the present century.
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by Ed Cogbur » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 10:43:33









>>>>>After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the
>>>>>real
>>>>>Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many

> overall

>>>>>posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four

> categories:

>>>>>1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like
>>>>>myself for example

>>>>>2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

>>>>>3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
>>>>>kernel

>>>>>4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the

> free

>>>>>world and China

>>>>>Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to

> tell

>>>who

>>>>>is who without a scorecard ?

>>>>I think you should add

>>>>Linux Enterprise Users: determined to have choice on how they can use
>>>>computer & Don't like monopolistic companies trying to control the OS
>>>>market by eliminating companies that offer other choices..

>>>Does everything have to relate to MicroSoft ?  Who made that rule ?

>>where did he mention Microsoft???

>>--
>>Paul Cooke
>>  Registered Linux user 273897 Machine registration number 156819
>>  Linux Counter: Home Page = http://counter.li.org/

> What did IBM and Intel do that was so wrong ?  Sell stuff ?

I've already mentioned once earlier that IBM was in anti-trust problems
in the early '80s.
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by cybea » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 11:17:57



> You do not need to repeat anything for my benefit.

Then why did you ask about what IBM did? All tha information has been
floating around for a LONG time. Asking "What did IBM and Intel do that was
so wrong ?" IS asking for infomation to be repeated for your benefit.
 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by Ian Pege » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 11:18:18


For it was written by cfswestern:

Quote:> After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
> Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
> posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

Ok, you got me! But you have to laugh, don't you??

I think you can be a little light-hearted and maintain a healthy
enthusiasm for this OS. In fact as far as advocacy is concerned I know
that I have put my money where my mouth is and invested heavily in
learning to use Linux, to the point where apart from once or twice a
month I do not use MS Windows at all.

Quote:> 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
> for example

I do this.

Quote:> 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

I do this. Not your C or C++ stuff, but PHP and Perl. It's what I make my
living at. Also some pretty demanding graphics work with the GIMP and
some 3D visualisations with POVRAY.

Quote:> 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
> kernel

I do some of this. I'm stuck on Slackware, but I have been known to do a
bit of kernel recompilation - though not as successfully as I might like
recently. As well as being a great tool, Linux is good fun to mess about
with.

--

Ian - looking through a glass onion

 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by Kenneth Down » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 15:22:41



> After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
> Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
> posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

> 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
> for example

> 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

> 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the
> kernel

> 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
> world and China

> Even though the FAQ seems to be reposted  weekly isn't it hard to tell who
> is who without a scorecard ?

For the record, these types of classifications were included in an earlier
FAQ effort, and proved to be quite divisive.  The FAQ as it is began to
receive acceptance when we took that kind of stuff out and
concentrated on Linux instead of people.

--
Ken
Linux, the more you learn, the more you love

 
 
 

How do you tell the advocates apart ?

Post by francesc » Mon, 19 Aug 2002 16:21:03



> After you have sorted out the amateur comedians how do you keep the real
> Linux Advocates separate?  Even though there are not very many overall
> posters in this newsgroup they seem to fall into about four categories:

> 1  Casual users:    Internet surfers and checkbook balancers like myself
> for example

> 2 Power users:     Programmers in other words

> 3 Hobbyists         Determined to use every distro and recompile the kernel

> 4 Enterprise Users   Determined to take over every computer in the free
> world and China

I think I fall somewhere in between casual user and hobbyists.   I've
been trying to try every distro, but I haven't recompiled my first
kernel, yet.  : )
 
 
 

1. How can AIX tell 1/4" cartridges apart?

Today's Trivia Question:

How does AIX tell what kind of 1/4" cartridge is in the drive?

The question may be trivial, but I wasted at least 2 hours with the problem.
I grabbed 2 fresh 6150 (150MB) tapes from the box to backup my 3003 release.
I then proceeded to waste about 2 hours trying to write on the first tape, but
kept getting errors whenever I tried to write on /dev/rmt0.  The errors were
immediate, not write or media failures.  I rebooted, powered everything off,
nothing helped.  Diagnostics passed with no problems.  On a whim, I tried
writing to /dev/rmt0.4 (low density), and it worked.  Finally, I tried the
second tape, and no problems at all.  First tape again, rmt0.4 works, rmt0
doesn't.  I then happened to notice that on the back of the failing tape,
included in a mass of numbers it said 600A, and the good one said 6150.  Ah,
the manufacturer put the wrong label on the tape, so I complained, etc.

So, how did AIX know?  I can't see any differences in the cartridges, so I
presume it has something to do with the little dance the tape does when put
into the drive.  The manufacturer's rep said by the tape oxide color, but I
don't believe that.

Thanks for any responses,
Steve

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Steve Roseman
Lehigh University Computing Center

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