MS vs. DOJ: impetus for a paradigm shift, against MS

MS vs. DOJ: impetus for a paradigm shift, against MS

Post by Sundial Service » Tue, 20 Nov 2001 12:05:50



One of the local magazines that comes to our office is the "Scottsdale
[Arizona] Airpark News," and in this month's issue there is an
interesting article on paradigms and paradigm-shifts that occur from
time to time in business.  Author Robert Ruffenach excerpts another
author, Joel Barker, from his 1992 book, "Paradigms:  The Business of
_Discovering the Future."  {italics mine}  To wit:

(1)  At some point in the future, what we are doing right now is no
longer going to solve the problems we need to solve ... we become
paralyzed by the current paradigm and relatively unable to see that if
we continue doing what we are doing, it _still won't get any better.

(2)  A fringe individual [or company...], someone who most likely
resides _outside the main stream, will bring us our new paradigm.
Barker calls this individual the paradigm shifter.

I believe that Linux will prove to be a devastating "paradigm shifter"
against Microsoft, whose "Microsoft Office Running On Microsoft Windows
On Every [X86, of course...] Desktop" model of computing could very soon
fall -- veritably _shoved in that course by the recent shifts in the
increasing farce, "Microsoft vs. The United States."

The United States has made it abundantly clear, by approving such
monstrosities as "AOL + Time + Warner + CNN + <who knows?>", and by
allowing the Standard Oil Trust from the 1920's to be only one step away
from reuiniting itself, that it _loves_ monopolies.  It has also made it
abundantly clear that it loves "free" trade (which means:  We Import
Anything).

I forsee a day, very soon coming, when a flood of inexpensively-produced
office machines, running Linux (but not an "in your face, techhie"
Linux) in very standardized configurations, will sweep the American
personal-sized computer industry right off shore, never to return.  The
Office of 2004 can read and write Microsoft Word compatible files, read
and write Excel spreadsheets, and exchange electronic-mail better than
Microsoft Exchange/Outlook ever did.  All for a cost of about $100 per
workstation [software included!], with an office-level application
server that costs between $400 and $600 complete.  All with "nothing
else to buy."

All of these machines would be constructed (e.g.) in China, and imported
in quantities.  Treaties such as GATT _guarantee that the United States
not only will not oppose this; but cannot do so.  

Technology workers would be able to service and even extend these
machines (they'd run Linux, after all...) but the monopoly environment
would be gone forever.  And so would some of the prices.  Not a
"destroyed" world by any means, by a radically different one.

The technology to do this exists -- literally and completely -- in the
Linux world _today.  The company who does this will not have to build
anything at all; merely package the existing technology in an attractive
and easy-to-use way, then secure the inexpensive hardware.

The office will receive "what it really wanted all along" for the first
time.  In fact, it will be far better than what Microsoft is able to
deliver.  Microsoft will be either history, or savaged.  Companies like,
oh, Dell, Compaq ... history.

By 2004.  I'm quite sure of that.  If not sooner.

 
 
 

MS vs. DOJ: impetus for a paradigm shift, against MS

Post by D. C. Session » Tue, 20 Nov 2001 13:48:30



Quote:> One of the local magazines that comes to our office is the "Scottsdale
> [Arizona] Airpark News," and in this month's issue there is an
> interesting article on paradigms and paradigm-shifts that occur from
> time to time in business.  Author Robert Ruffenach excerpts another
> author, Joel Barker, from his 1992 book, "Paradigms:  The Business of
> _Discovering the Future."  {italics mine}  To wit:

Airpark News is one of the best local business rags around.  They've
been surprising me at least twice a year for twenty years.

--
| Microsoft: "A reputation for releasing inferior software will make |
| it more difficult for a software vendor to induce customers to pay |
| for new products or new versions of existing products."            |


 
 
 

MS vs. DOJ: impetus for a paradigm shift, against MS

Post by Mike » Fri, 23 Nov 2001 01:10:41



Quote:> The United States has made it abundantly clear, by approving such
> monstrosities as "AOL + Time + Warner + CNN + <who knows?>", and by
> allowing the Standard Oil Trust from the 1920's to be only one step away
> from reuiniting itself, that it _loves_ monopolies.  It has also made it
> abundantly clear that it loves "free" trade (which means:  We Import
> Anything).

Where's Matthew Gardiner? He was complaining recently that the problem with
the US is that we prevent competitive products from being imported, like
inexpensive, high quality Australian steel.

And what about your favorite import, Linux? It competes with Solaris, HPUX,
Windows, Be, Palm, and a host of embedded OSes. To protect our companies and
their markets, shouldn't we send Linux back to Finland?

-- Mike --

 
 
 

MS vs. DOJ: impetus for a paradigm shift, against MS

Post by Peter K?hlman » Fri, 23 Nov 2001 01:19:25



> And what about your favorite import, Linux? It competes with Solaris,
> HPUX, Windows, Be, Palm, and a host of embedded OSes. To protect our
> companies and their markets, shouldn't we send Linux back to Finland?

You don't mean that, don't you? You know that "Linux" is neither imported
nor from Finland alone, RedHat for example is american, SuSE is german
(but also in the US), Mandrake is french.
And what about those imports of that pile of shit called MS-Windows into
all the countries except the US?

Peter
--
What happens if a big asteroid hits Earth? Judging from realistic
simulations involving a sledge hammer and a common laboratory frog,
we can assume it will be pretty bad.    --- Dave Barry

 
 
 

MS vs. DOJ: impetus for a paradigm shift, against MS

Post by Mike » Fri, 23 Nov 2001 16:26:10




> > And what about your favorite import, Linux? It competes with Solaris,
> > HPUX, Windows, Be, Palm, and a host of embedded OSes. To protect our
> > companies and their markets, shouldn't we send Linux back to Finland?

> You don't mean that, don't you? You know that "Linux" is neither imported
> nor from Finland alone, RedHat for example is american, SuSE is german
> (but also in the US), Mandrake is french.

Of course I didn't mean it; I was being facetious. Even ignoring
distributions, a quick look at the contributors to the most popular Linux
software shows that it's an international undertaking.

Quote:> And what about those imports of MS-Windows into
> all the countries except the US?

Of course, that would make Sundial (the original poster) mad too - not only
does the US support free trade, but we even go so far as to export our
products. Damn all those other countries! First, they sell us their
products, then they buy ours! What JERKS!

-- Mike --

 
 
 

1. Bork Issues White Paper on DOJ's Case Against MS

Robert Bork has issued a white paper while fully explains the nature of
the DOJ's case against Microsoft and the real issues involved.  It can
currently be found at:

http://www.zdnet.com/zdnn/stories/zdnn_smgraph_display/0,3441,2123665...

"Share and enjoy!"

Max
--
.--------------------------------------+--------------------------------------.

| /  \/ /\ http://www.pobox.com/~mbell |  Switch to Netscape and Boycott IE!  |
`--------------------------------------+--------------------------------------'

2. ANNOUNCE: Use Microsoft ISAPI w/ Netscape and Apache Servers!

3. Letter to the DOJ against MS

4. Programming Reference for ncurses.

5. MS vs. DOJ: in the end, "grease" wins

6. Upgrading to Solaris

7. MS vs DoJ -- Black Friday, 01-Nov-2002

8. IMS TT and LinuxPPC X

9. MS vs. DOJ: Microsoft rendered .. irrelevant?

10. How to fix Netscape's monopoly (& solve DOJ vs MS)

11. X windows vs MS-windows 3.1 (MS wins)

12. Antitrust legal beagles suing MS and DoJ

13. MS-DOJ: Analysis of a Sell-Out