The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by thelift » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 03:15:14



Ok, for those who don't know what WINE is, here is the link:
http://www.winehq.org

In short: WINE is a Linux program that enables any windows software to
run on a Linux box. It works by implementing all the windows specific
APIs and translating them to the corresponding Linux APIs. So far WINE
is not complete but some Windows programs already run on it.

It is my opinion that this project is of fundamental strategic
importance for Linux and I wonder why so little effort is invested
into it. Only around 20 programmers are really working on it, although
some more may be officially involved.

Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
could run on a Linux box. This would definitively be the end for the
Microsoft Monopoly. Nobody would need to buy a Windows OS anymore.
Finally the argument "Linux has only a limited number of software"
would no longer be true. You could run all your favorite windows
programs on Linux. On the long run this would also benefit Linux
native software. Because once Wine is running, more and more people
would use Linux, increasing the market share for Linux native software
also!

So in fact, working on WINE is more important than working on any
other Linux software, except the Kernel itself of course.

So I wonder, why is there so little being done to promote WINE? This
should be marked as one big strategic corner piece of Linux and open
source! Instead people are wasting time on endless discussions in
Newsgroups or useless projects...All the big open source advocates
should be promoting WINE, why aren't they doing it?

I think there is a war going on, and if we want to win we have to
build up a strategy and focus on important goals. Just building
superior technologie doesn't guarantee a win. Lets face it: Linux has
less than 1% marketshare. Peoples decision are based on practical
issues: does the operating system run software X? If not, I cannot use
it...no matter how superior it is. We have to think about the users
not just technical issues. Otherwise Linux will be a niche product for
ever.

WINE is what Linux needs most and most urgent!

Thanks for any feedback...

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Stefan Heimer » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 03:25:52


Do you remember OS/2? It ran Win3.x programs quite well. The result was
that nobody ported their Windows Program to OS/2 -> that was the end!

Stefan

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by domi » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 03:30:43



> Ok, for those who don't know what WINE is, here is the link:
> http://www.winehq.org

> In short: WINE is a Linux program that enables any windows software to
> run on a Linux box. It works by implementing all the windows specific
> APIs and translating them to the corresponding Linux APIs. So far WINE
> is not complete but some Windows programs already run on it.

> It is my opinion that this project is of fundamental strategic
> importance for Linux and I wonder why so little effort is invested
> into it. Only around 20 programmers are really working on it, although
> some more may be officially involved.

> Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
> could run on a Linux box. This would definitively be the end for the
> Microsoft Monopoly. Nobody would need to buy a Windows OS anymore.
> Finally the argument "Linux has only a limited number of software"

this is not true now also, it's a myth that linux has few software, there's a
perfectly good alternative for every win-prog i know (except for some video
programs)
if you like wine that much, join the development team
domi

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> would no longer be true. You could run all your favorite windows
> programs on Linux. On the long run this would also benefit Linux
> native software. Because once Wine is running, more and more people
> would use Linux, increasing the market share for Linux native software
> also!

> So in fact, working on WINE is more important than working on any
> other Linux software, except the Kernel itself of course.

> So I wonder, why is there so little being done to promote WINE? This
> should be marked as one big strategic corner piece of Linux and open
> source! Instead people are wasting time on endless discussions in
> Newsgroups or useless projects...All the big open source advocates
> should be promoting WINE, why aren't they doing it?

> I think there is a war going on, and if we want to win we have to
> build up a strategy and focus on important goals. Just building
> superior technologie doesn't guarantee a win. Lets face it: Linux has
> less than 1% marketshare. Peoples decision are based on practical
> issues: does the operating system run software X? If not, I cannot use
> it...no matter how superior it is. We have to think about the users
> not just technical issues. Otherwise Linux will be a niche product for
> ever.

> WINE is what Linux needs most and most urgent!

> Thanks for any feedback...

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Kaz Kylhe » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 04:04:01



>Ok, for those who don't know what WINE is, here is the link:
>http://www.winehq.org

>In short: WINE is a Linux program that enables any windows software to
>run on a Linux box. It works by implementing all the windows specific
>APIs and translating them to the corresponding Linux APIs. So far WINE
>is not complete but some Windows programs already run on it.

>It is my opinion that this project is of fundamental strategic
>importance for Linux and I wonder why so little effort is invested
>into it. Only around 20 programmers are really working on it, although
>some more may be officially involved.

Have you read any Fred Brooks? Throwing more people at a project can
only create overheads and confusion. Twenty programmers is a throng for
a freeware project.

The Win32 interfaces are a bletcherous pile of trash. The people working
on Wine must have an incredible sense of dedication, not to mention
and extremely high tolerance for badly designed garbage.  Clearly,
this takes a very special individual. I'm surprised that twenty such
people could be found, as you claim.

Quote:>Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
>could run on a Linux box. This would definitively be the end for the
>Microsoft Monopoly. Nobody would need to buy a Windows OS anymore.

Nobody needs to buy one now; they get it with their computer.
Microsoft would use their enormous resources to ensure that no cosumer
ever finds out about Wine. Moreover, they will take steps to ensure
that their applications do not work on Wine. For example, they could
start implementing functions to allow applications to request checksums
of arbitrary byte ranges of Windows DLL's. Copies of Microsoft programs
could be mutated to request a different set of ranges. The effect would
be that programs would have to be cracked in order to work with Wine,
or else the user would have to own a copy of the system DLL's.

Perhaps Wine only works as well as it does because it *only* works
as well as it does. If it gets too good, look out!

There are other issues. Microsoft is not the only player. Users in the
so-called real world require support for their Windows applications.
Do you think Microsoft will support their applications if they are
deployed on a non-Microsoft platform? What about other vendors of Windows
apps? Got a bug to report? Please reproduce it on ``real'' Windows then
bother us.

There would have to be a huge number of people using Wine in order for
vendors other than Microsoft to consider supporting their applications
on it. Microsoft never will, so you can forget about a company based on
products like Exchange and Office getting any support.

Quote:>should be marked as one big strategic corner piece of Linux and open
>source! Instead people are wasting time on endless discussions in
>Newsgroups or useless projects...All the big open source advocates
>should be promoting WINE, why aren't they doing it?

Maybe because many of them don't use Windows software? Why should
people advocate something they have no use for?

Advocates do mention Wine when users ask whether they can run
some of their Windows programs after they switch to Linux.

Wine is a workaround, not an answer to anything. The real monopoly is in
the applications, not in the operating system. If everyone runs Microsoft
applications on Wine, exactly what has been accomplished?  One irrelevant
low layer has been replaced by an equally irrelevant workalike.
The only part that is free is the workalike, and it is constrained to
behave exactly like the proprietary system layer that it replaces, or else
the non-free applications won't work. The non-free application layer is
where the users invest the most of themselves, where they give up the bulk
of their computing freedoms.

Arguably, the user who runs freeware applications on top of Windows
is more free than the one who runs proprietary Windows applications
on top of a workalike.

Quote:>WINE is what Linux needs most and most urgent!

You know that there are other ways to run Windows and Linux at the
same time on one computer, such as VMWare. There is a freeware clone of
VMWare called Plex86 (www.plex86.org).

The thing that is most useful about Wine, from a free software point
of view, is not running Windows executables, but rather Winelib, which
allows Windows code to be ported to Linux.  A program linked to Winelib
is essentially a native Linux application, albeit one that uses, shall
we say, an alternative library to interface with the system. In this
way, Wine provides one way for developers to migrate their products from
Windows.  There exists some nonportable free software that is written
to the Windows API. With Winelib, such software has a shot at being
made to run on a free platform as well, thereby being ``rescued'' from
its dependency on a proprietary operating sytem.

This is analogous to what happened with the GNU utilities. GNU replaced
UNIX by starting with the application layer, not by starting with the
low level kernel interface. At the outset, GNU programs ran on top of
proprietary UNIX operating systems; the Linux kernel came later, thereby
``rescuing'' the free software from its proprietary encumberment.  (To be
fair, BSD becoming free also provided a free kernel for these programs).

So for Wine to be strategically important to the free software community,
there would have to be a large amout of free software that currently only
runs on Windows. Then you have a great case for cloning Windows itself.
That is not the case; most free software running on Windows is usually
a port from the Unix interface, not infrequently an imperfect port.

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Bone » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 04:35:38


[snip]

Quote:> It is my opinion that this project is of fundamental strategic
> importance for Linux and I wonder why so little effort is invested
> into it.

You're allowing yourself to absorb FUD. Enough effort is invested into it,
but more an that later...

Quote:> Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
> could run on a Linux box.

I don't understand why this is so important? I have more software than I can
shake a stick at on my Linux boxen. I don't need any more software, much
less the windows[tm] variants, from which I have tried to escape.

Quote:> This would definitively be the end for the Microsoft Monopoly.

What is your reasoning behind this? This would be damaging to Linux, since
it would perpetuate dependence on MS application software, and also ensure
that further generations of programmers are trapped into knowing only
windows'[tm] alien API.

Quote:> Nobody would need to buy a Windows OS anymore.

No... It would just delay Linux' overtaking of the desktop market,
especially considering the current state of affairs. MS OSes are installed
by default on every new PC, why would any one volutarily switch from
windows[tm] to something that looks exactly like Windows[tm] and runs the
same applications? Salesfolk could argue technical points, but the catatonic
buyers would simply make a choice based on 1) convenience, and 2)
appearance.

Quote:> Finally the argument "Linux has only a limited number of software"
> would no longer be true.

It hasn't been true for half-a-decade. You just bought a one-way bus ticket
to Trollville. Planning on using it?

Quote:> You could run all your favorite windows programs on Linux.

Doubtful. If you haven't noticed: MS has been releasing, and will release
new versions of Windows[tm] every two years. MS always tacks on some new
APIs with the releases. 100% compatibility is a lose-lose situation for the
WINE developers, since the environment is constantly changing, and the only
possible outcome is a windows[tm] clone.

Quote:> On the long run this would also benefit Linux native software.

Linux' application base would be better served by developers who develop for
Linux first, and every other platform afterword. Most Linux software
developers have portability in mind when they create something, and this
benefits other platforms beside Linux. Windows developers become familiar
only with MS's evil and twisted API, and eventually end up being held
captive by it, because they are unable to apply their specialized knowledge
to other programming environments. Encouraging further Windows[tm] software
development is *bad*.

Quote:> Because once Wine is running, more and more people would use Linux,
> increasing the market share for Linux native software also!

So you are saying that giving users the option of running Windows
applications (with which they are already familiar) on a Linux system will
make users more apt to use native Linux applications. I don't understand the
logical behind that one.

Quote:> So in fact, working on WINE is more important than working on any
> other Linux software, except the Kernel itself of course.
> So I wonder, why is there so little being done to promote WINE? This
> should be marked as one big strategic corner piece of Linux and open
> source!

WINE definitely has its place, but it is not a way to make Linux into a
Windows[tm] clone. I would say that a proper use would be to help
Windows[tm] users more easily migrate away from an MS computing environment.

Quote:> Instead people are wasting time on endless discussions in
> Newsgroups or useless projects...All the big open source advocates
> should be promoting WINE, why aren't they doing it?

You are now on the FUD bus to Trollville, you'd better get off before the
last stop.

Quote:> I think there is a war going on, and if we want to win we have to
> build up a strategy and focus on important goals. Just building
> superior technologie doesn't guarantee a win.

No, but when you do it cheaper than the competition, it sure helps out a
lot. As a matter of fact, about the only way to stop the competitor with the
more reliable, cheaper product is to illegally prevent him from reaching
"your" market.

Quote:> Lets face it: Linux has less than 1% marketshare.

BAM! The FUD bus slams into the side of Trollville Town Hall, thelifter
rolls out, bruised but otherwise OK.

Who is this, the poster formerly known as 'Anonymous'? Yep, the old
'pretend-to-be-a-linux-advocate-and-adopt-a defeatist-attitude' trolling
technique. There are no studies which show that Linux has less than 1%
marketshare. There is evidence that Linux has 50% marketshare in the server
arena:

   http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1003-200-1546430.html

I believe you are referring to Web Side Story's determination of Linux usage
by counting browser ID strings. Not only is this technique inaccurate, it
was done over a small portion of the Internet (representing only commercial
sites), and neither Web Side Story or StatMarket will produce actual figures
or detail data-gathering methods. Translation: It is unsupportable bunk.

Quote:> Peoples decision are based on practical issues: does the operating system
> run software X?

A practical concern would be: Can the software do X? The other 'practical
issue' which you suggested is of concern only to Microsoft.

Quote:> If not, I cannot use it...no matter how superior it is.

Translation: I cannot learn anything new. If you take a beating from other
people in this newsgroup for that statement, you have no one to blame but
yourself.

[snip]

----
Bones

The opinions  stated  here are
my own, and do not necessarily
reflect  those of my employer.

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Walter Haber » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 05:15:28


Quote:> It is my opinion that this project is of fundamental strategic
> importance for Linux and I wonder why so little effort is invested
> ...cut...
> Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
> could run on a Linux box. This would definitively be the end for the
> ...cut...

Hi.

I have been TeamOS/2 for years. We learned that if a software manufacturer
has to decide "well, let us think about it, we have 100 Million PCs running
Windows, we have 5 Million PCs running OS/2 ... the 5 Million PCs with OS/2
can run Windows Software in Emulation-Mode so ... why write/port a Program
for 5 Million potential customers instead of writing native Windows SW that
adresses 105 Million potential customers?" If you were a SW-Company's Boss,
how would you decide? Set aside idealistic ideas and think in Dollars like
those people do. Think about it.

*I* think that the Windows Emulation helped a lot to kill OS/2.

There is VMWare (299 USD, I know, expensive stuff) out there. You run a
virtual PC in Linux and install a MS OS of your choice (and you may well
blame MS if it crashes, not the poor Emulator-People who have no chance to
fight MS's efforts to make the Emulator fail with any new release or
service-pak. I know what I am talking about, as I told, OS/2 had an emulator
...)

If you use Linux as task-switcher for instable Windows-SW you abuse it. This
will not boost Linux's evolution, this will not motivate people to port
their SW to native Linux Code ("hey, it runs in Wine, what do you want
more?"). And you will still not adress the mass of users with the Emulator
because many people want to PLAY (sorry, this is reality) and no emulator in
the known universe can make you play actual Win-Games, not even VMWare.

This is only *my* opinion, have fun, Walter.

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by el.. » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 05:27:50




>Have you read any Fred Brooks? Throwing more people at a project
>can only create overheads and confusion. Twenty programmers is a
>throng for a freeware project.

>The Win32 interfaces are a bletcherous pile of trash.

That's because M$ throws more than 20 programmers at creating
those interfaces. ;)

--
http://www.spinics.net/linux/

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Walter Haber » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 05:33:00


Quote:> > Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
> > could run on a Linux box.

> I don't understand why this is so important? I have more software than I
can
> shake a stick at on my Linux boxen. I don't need any more software, much
> less the windows[tm] variants, from which I have tried to escape.

Encylopedias on CD-ROM? Windows only. Language Courses with pronounciation
training? Windows only. Lotus Notes Client (strategic in many big
companies)? Windows only. Bluetooth communication Software? afaik Windows
only. GPRS Internet connection SW for cellphones/Laptops? afaik Windows
only. The fancy MP3-Player with 128MB RAM, buy it and try to load the Player
with MP3-Files from Linux and you see ... probably under Windows only.

Please do not misunderstand me. I am about to switch from Win to Linux
because I can't close my eyes any longer what MS is doing. But I know that
my private decission puts me into a state where "simple shopping HW or SW in
any Store" is history from that moment on forever. And I can decide at home
about "strategic products", I can not alter the OS of my company's Laptop
because Lotus Notes is strategic there. And there is another WinOnly SW and
a third one without a Linux port. So, from my point of view Linux at the
moment (!) lacks a lot of important SW. It will not adress the enduser and
most companies on client side as long as industry does not support it as
well as compared to Windows. And as we all know: The Client OS is the best
way to domination of the IT-Industry.

Linux is on a good way. I feel hope about the future but I see the
obstacles. I see a Macintosh in 1998 (?) just about to go bancrupt, then
comes MS, spends 100 Million USD and ports Office to MacOS and - miracle -
Macintosh is alive and doing well since then. I see BeOS, a fast, stable,
almost perfect OS. Not enough SW, never mention HW-drivers. It exists since
years, it has no publicity, no importance. Got my point?

Again: I have a good feeling about Linux, otherwise I would not migrate, but
I do not ignore facts, there is no perfect Linux-world, Windows *has* its
strength.

Quote:> WINE definitely has its place, but it is not a way to make Linux into a
> Windows[tm] clone. I would say that a proper use would be to help
> Windows[tm] users more easily migrate away from an MS computing

environment.

For migration I would really suggest VMWare because you install a true
Windows of choice and no one has to tackle around with emulator-problems
("does this silly program not work at all or is it the emulator's fault?")

ok, this is just *my* honest opinion, the most important thing is to have
fun, bye, Walter.

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Arthu » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 05:37:42



> There is VMWare (299 USD, I know, expensive stuff) out there. You run a
> virtual PC in Linux and install a MS OS of your choice (and you may well
> blame MS if it crashes, not the poor Emulator-People who have no chance to
> fight MS's efforts to make the Emulator fail with any new release or
> service-pak. I know what I am talking about, as I told, OS/2 had an emulator
> ...)

There's a VMWare version that only does Win9x and goes
for $99 or less. There's also Plex86 that's free (but
I haven't tried it). Based on limited experience, Windows
apps run much better under VMWare than under Wine. In fact
I thought Win98SE was more stable under VMWare than
running without it, and Windows apps can't crash your
system (come to think of it, I don't believe I ever had
one crash VMWare either).

Arthur

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Terry Port » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 07:56:51


On Thu, 27 Dec 2001 19:04:01 GMT, Kaz Kylheku in article


>>Ok, for those who don't know what WINE is, here is the link:
>>http://www.winehq.org

I think Kaz's post is really the definitive summary of all things
Wine, and would only add that the biggest disapointment when using
Wine is the app that you're running under Wine, is still Windows.

<snip Kaz's post>

For anyone who doesnt know Kaz, he was posting to Cola, when I subscribed
in 1997, and he is a well read usenet programmer.

--
                 _
               .' `.              Free Micro Burner
               |a_a|   http://w3w.arafuraconnect.com.au/~tp/burn.html
  Debian       \ V /
  2.2.20      /(   )\      Linux Registration Number: 103931
             |\`> < /\           http://counter.li.org
             \_|=='|_/
* OSS is long-term credible ... FUD tactics can not be used to combat it.

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Walter Haber » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 08:07:02


Sorry, no, this is no longer true, I have received an email from

yesterday that states (excerpt):

"In an effort to concentrate our company's resources on products that offer
the greatest utility to the majority of our customers, we have decided to
stop further development of VMware(TM) Express. As a result, the version of
VMware Express that shipped in the summer of 2001 is the last version of the
product that we will release.

I'm sorry but VMware Express is no longer available for sale.

If you would like to purchase VMware Workstation 3.0, the commercial price
is $299 USD for the electronic download version and $329 USD for the
packaged version (plus shipping charges).

If you are a current user of our VMware Workstation 2.0 software and you
want to upgrade, then you can upgrade to Workstation 3.0 for the price of
$99 USD for the electronic download version, and $129 USD for the packaged
version."

This means, NO cheap version anymore. ;-(




> > There is VMWare (299 USD, I know, expensive stuff) out there. You run a
> > virtual PC in Linux and install a MS OS of your choice (and you may well
> > blame MS if it crashes, not the poor Emulator-People who have no chance
to
> > fight MS's efforts to make the Emulator fail with any new release or
> > service-pak. I know what I am talking about, as I told, OS/2 had an
emulator
> > ...)

> There's a VMWare version that only does Win9x and goes
> for $99 or less. There's also Plex86 that's free (but
> I haven't tried it). Based on limited experience, Windows
> apps run much better under VMWare than under Wine. In fact
> I thought Win98SE was more stable under VMWare than
> running without it, and Windows apps can't crash your
> system (come to think of it, I don't believe I ever had
> one crash VMWare either).

> Arthur

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Arthu » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 08:14:48



> Sorry, no, this is no longer true, I have received an email from

> yesterday that states (excerpt):

It appears I'm a day late and about $200 short.

Quote:> "I'm sorry but VMware Express is no longer available for sale.
> If you would like to purchase VMware Workstation 3.0, the commercial price
> is $299 USD for the electronic download version and $329 USD for the
> packaged version (plus shipping charges)."

Ummm, no thank you; I don't believe I like Windows all that much.

Quote:> This means, NO cheap version anymore. ;-(

One more reason to not run Windows.

Arthur

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by John Beardmor » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 08:12:39




Quote:>You know that there are other ways to run Windows and Linux at the
>same time on one computer, such as VMWare. There is a freeware clone of
>VMWare called Plex86 (www.plex86.org).

Is anybody using Plex86 in anger with RH 7.2 ?  The release notes say:

     "This code is extremely experimental, and will likely result in a
system
     crash, and who knows what other ill effects. Don't run it on a
system
     with any important data on it, and make liberal user of the sync
     command! Expect to have to use the power button."

Is it as dire as immature as it sounds, or can it support real working
windows apps in the virtualised OSs ?

And what is the current state of the project, especially on SMP boxes ?

Is anybody actually running for example multiple copies of win 2000
under it ?

Cheers, J/.
--
John Beardmore

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Richard Thripplet » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 08:02:46



>Ok, for those who don't know what WINE is, here is the link:
>http://www.veryComputer.com/
<snip>
>WINE is what Linux needs most and most urgent!

        Beg to differ. It would be disastrous. Why develop software for
Linux when you can just write Windows software? This would completely knock
over a lot of linux users...

total 36
drwxr-sr-x    7 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 alpha
drwxr-sr-x    8 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:05 arm
drwxr-sr-x    7 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 i386
drwxr-sr-x   19 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 m68k
drwxr-sr-x   14 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 mips
drwxr-sr-x   12 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 ppc
drwxr-sr-x    7 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 s390
drwxr-sr-x    9 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:06 sparc
drwxr-sr-x    9 rt       admin        4096 Nov  2 23:05 sparc64

        You see? Of course, the arrogant point of view would be "Well, less
people use non i386, so let's*'em". While you're at it, you could ditch
Linux and go to the majority platform of Windows.

Richard
--
My .sig blatant plug
http://www.veryComputer.com/~ret28

 
 
 

The fundamental importance of WINE for Linux

Post by Sean » Sat, 29 Dec 2001 08:40:57



> Ok, for those who don't know what WINE is, here is the link:
> http://www.winehq.org

> In short: WINE is a Linux program that enables any windows software to
> run on a Linux box. It works by implementing all the windows specific
> APIs and translating them to the corresponding Linux APIs. So far WINE
> is not complete but some Windows programs already run on it.

> <snip>

See http://appdb.codeweavers.com/appbrowse.php for details of currently
supported programs.

Quote:> Imagine if WINE worked 100%. That would mean, ANY windows program
> could run on a Linux box. This would definitively be the end for the
> Microsoft Monopoly. Nobody would need to buy a Windows OS anymore.
> Finally the argument "Linux has only a limited number of software"
> would no longer be true. You could run all your favorite windows
> programs on Linux. On the long run this would also benefit Linux
> native software. Because once Wine is running, more and more people
> would use Linux, increasing the market share for Linux native software
> also!

> <snip>

BUT....there's these weasel words in the WINE home page:

          "Wine does not require Microsoft Windows, as it is a
          completely alternative implementation consisting of 100%
          Microsoft-free code, but it can optionally use native
          system DLLs if they are available."

The application still requires a licence for the Windows product in
order to run under WINE.  And if I am not mistaken, any use of
"system DLLs" to help WINE along would require a licence from the DLL
licence owner - likely Micro$oft.

All in all, the need for either or both of these licences destroys
the reason for using WINE/Linux in the first place.

Sean

 
 
 

1. Wine,wine,wine - I need help with wine

Help
I down loaded and installed Wine to Linux 2.0.22 and Xwindows (XFree).
I think it's installed correctly.  I am getting a 'drive not found/path
not found' error.  I have my wine.conf in the right place (I think).
I'm using Win95 and hda3 and Linux on hda1.  I need a reality check.  Is
it hard to set up Wine?  Does someone have a working wine.conf file that
might guide me to a working wine.   Wine,wine,wine and beer. Ok I'll
stop wineing

Thanks
George

--

--
**************************************************
*                                                *
*   -----(((( Every Dog Has His Day ))))-----    *
*       ( to stay on the porch and bark )        *
*                                                *
*                George Dunham                   *
*            "Crappy Computers Ink"              *

*     http://www.sni.net/~gdunham/gdunh.htm      *
*    arf             |\__/\                      *
*        arf arf     / oo \_                     *
*             arf    | o  | \                    *
*                arf  \()/   \   )               *
**************************************************

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