Process rollover

Process rollover

Post by Pascal Forge » Fri, 10 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
number?

I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
to reboot once a week.

Thanks,


 
 
 

Process rollover

Post by Bill Gribbl » Fri, 10 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
> about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
> number?

> I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
> to reboot once a week.

What does process number rollover have to do with rebooting?  There's
nothing wrong with process numbers starting over.  My machines stay up for
weeks and go through several rollovers of PIDs.  No problem.

Bill Gribble

 
 
 

Process rollover

Post by Hans-Joachim Baad » Fri, 10 Oct 1997 04:00:00




Quote:>Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
>about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
>number?

>I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
>to reboot once a week.

My machine runs for weeks, and experiences a process id rollover
every few days. Where's the problem?

hjb

--
Veni, Vidi, VISA:
        I came, I saw, I did a little shopping.

 
 
 

Process rollover

Post by bme.. » Sat, 11 Oct 1997 04:00:00



>Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
>about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
>number?
>I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
>to reboot once a week.

What problem?

Bernie

--
============================================================================
"It's a magical world, Hobbes ol' buddy...
                                           ...let's go exploring"
Calvin's final words, on December 31st, 1995

 
 
 

Process rollover

Post by H. Peter Anv » Sat, 11 Oct 1997 04:00:00




In newsgroup: comp.os.linux.development.system

Quote:

> Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
> about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
> number?

No.

Quote:

> I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
> to reboot once a week.

Why?  This is perfectly normal and expected behaviour.

        -hpa
--
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    See http://www.zytor.com/~hpa/ for web page and full PGP public key
        I am Bah' -- ask me about it or see http://www.bahai.org/
   "To love another person is to see the face of God." -- Les Misrables

 
 
 

Process rollover

Post by Marco Angles » Sat, 11 Oct 1997 04:00:00


: Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
: about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
: number?

It works that way on Solaris (which I use at work) and pretty much any
Unix I've ever heard of.

: I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
: to reboot once a week.

Why do you have to reboot? They roll over and things go on as before.
Unless you're logging each and every process and need a unique number
(why?), I can't see why you would possibly need to reboot. It isn't
that the machine's running out of space; it's just a counter.

m.
---

   "We know what causes *: poverty, discrimination, the
    failure of the educational system. It's not the genes that
    cause * in our society." - Paul Billings

 
 
 

Process rollover

Post by Jay Thorn » Sat, 11 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> Running the latest Slackware Linux on Intel, my process numbers go up to
> about 32,000 before rolling back to 1.  Is there any way to increase that
> number?

> I use Linux as a development machine, and because of that problem, I have
> to reboot once a week.

> Thanks,



It takes you a week?  Mine rolls over in less than a day, running X,
several
xterms, all sorts of development tasks.

What really is the problem?  Linux re-uses process id's just like every
other unix in existence, and quite a few other OS's.   32000 currently
running
processes would *most current computers that have unix/linux ports,
though it may be shaving it close on a 6 processor Alpha with a gig of
RAM.  When the process dies, the process ID is usable again.  If you
have a management system that somehow needs to have a linear search of
process id's to get the "age" of a process, then for _any_ OS its
terribly broken.
On VMS, it used to start the numbers with a 32bit value that was related
to its CPU ID, and its "Cluster ID"  but that could roll over too.
--
Jay Thorne    The Net Result System Services

Zoom 505 Effect page http://www.veryComputer.com/~jay

 
 
 

1. Kernel "jiffies" roll-over

Hi,

I was reading "Linux Device Drivers", by Alessandro Rubini, O'Reilly,
Chapter 6.  It indicates
that the Linux timer interrupt increments a counter called "jiffies",
which is an unsigned long
volatile. For a PC it is incremented at a 100Hz rate, which means it
rolls over after 1-1/3 years.
An example in the Kernel Timers section (p.149) indicates that no
provision is made to handle
the roll-over condition.

My question is: Will the system crash if it is left running for 1-1/3+
years?

On a related topic, I remember reading somewhere that there is a way to
set up Linux so that
it will automatically re-boot if it crashes. Can you give me a reference
for that information? I
lost track of it.

We have an application in which we would like to run Linux hands-off
continuously. We could
tolerate an occasional automatic re-boot.

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide on this!

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