dump,restore,rdump

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Tony Stephen Teag » Tue, 28 Nov 1995 04:00:00



hello,
  Is there dump,rdump and restore for linux .. I need backup software
but I don't would to use tar,gtar,cpio and dd ..

                                                     --tony

--
--

Tony Stephen Teague                          
The City College Science Computing      

*******************************************************************************

 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Mumit Kh » Tue, 28 Nov 1995 04:00:00




Quote:>hello,
>  Is there dump,rdump and restore for linux .. I need backup software
>but I don't would to use tar,gtar,cpio and dd ..

>                                                     --tony

Here's an old posting from my archives:

 -- using template mhl.format --
Date:    Thu, 12 Oct 1995 19:01:16 CDT


Subject: Re: Dump/restore on ext2fs

If you're using ext2fs filesystem, then check out dump v0.2e package
(ftp://tsx-11.mit.edu/pub/linux/packages/ext2fs/dump-0.2e.tar.gz) in
the tsx-11 Linux archive. I personally use GNU tar instead so I can
backup my DOS partition as well, so I can't vouch for it's quality
(my simple minded tests did show that it works though).

regards,

http://www.xraylith.wisc.edu/~khan/

Cc: comp.os.linux.development.system,


 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Andrew R. Tef » Wed, 29 Nov 1995 04:00:00




Quote:>Why not?  GNU tar works great for backups.

Tar works great for backups, but what a pain for restores. In my
unix experience I haven't found anything (including GUIs) that can
beat restore for simplicity and usability. Navigate the backup
with ls and cd, mark the files you want, and extract them in one
go. The only thing it lacks is a little flexibility in *where*
the restores go -- they are always relative to wherever you were
when you ran restore. And a 'find' command would be handy too.

A front end for tar could extract a table of contents, let you navigate
and find the files you want, and go back and extract your files, sure.
But that's not tar.

--


 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Jurgen Bo » Wed, 29 Nov 1995 04:00:00




Quote:>  Is there dump,rdump and restore for linux .. I need backup software
>but I don't would to use tar,gtar,cpio and dd ..

Why not?  GNU tar works great for backups.  Elizabeth Zwicky gave a
talk at Usenix a couple of years ago reporting that they'd done
various reliability tests on a whole slew of backup utilties and found
GNU tar to be best.  With the --listed option you can do different
dump-levels, so there really isn't anything dump can do that GNU tar
can't.  Also, dump is filesystem dependent, and since Linux has a
variety of filesystems, that's a problem.
--

"Unix?  What's that?  Is that like Linux?"
 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Harald Koen » Fri, 01 Dec 1995 04:00:00





> >Why not?  GNU tar works great for backups.

any tar version changes the access date of any backuped file
since it uses regular file system code to read files.
in some environments thats not not allowed at all or at least not wishable.

Harald
--
All SCSI disks will from now on                     ___       _____
be required to send an email notice                0--,|    /OOOOOOO\
24 hours prior to complete hardware failure!      <_/  /  /OOOOOOOOOOO\
                                                    \  \/OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO\
                                                      \ OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO|//
Harald Koenig,                                         \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
Inst.f.Theoret.Astrophysik                              //  /     \\  \

 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Lars Wirzeni » Sat, 02 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Quote:> any tar version changes the access date of any backuped file

Not necessarily, since it is possible to remount the filesystem read-only
while doing the backup, then remount it read-write again after the backup
is done.

If you're using dump, you need to unmount the filesystem anyway, so there
is no problem doing it for tar.

FWIW, I use dump myself, and use a shell script like the one below
to do the backup (I'm not at my own system at the moment, so I can't
give the exact script):

        umount /home
        dump 0uf /dev/ftape /home
        mount /home

(Doing backups of live filesystems is usually not a good idea, since the file
may be modified while it is being backed up.  But in some environments it
is not possible to have the system off-line even during backups.)

--


Publib 0.5: ftp://ftp.cs.helsinki.fi/pub/Software/Local/Publib/

 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Arie Maaska » Sat, 02 Dec 1995 04:00:00



>FWIW, I use dump myself, and use a shell script like the one below
>to do the backup (I'm not at my own system at the moment, so I can't
>give the exact script):
>    umount /home
>    dump 0uf /dev/ftape /home
>    mount /home
>(Doing backups of live filesystems is usually not a good idea, since the file
>may be modified while it is being backed up.  But in some environments it
>is not possible to have the system off-line even during backups.)

In practice this is partly true. In my 13 year experience with dump and
restore ( from Unix6, through BSD-unix until Solaris2.4 ) on systems with
hundreds of ( potential users ) I am always dumping from livefilesystems.
I have never had any bad practices because of doing it this way. If Linux
is using the BSD variant of dumping and restoring ( I don't know, I have not
used that version yet ) I can't hardly believe that dumping livefilesystems
can give errors. We dump however in quiet periods ( 2 o'clock in the morning )

Arie
--
Arie Maaskant                   University of Amsterdam

Phone: +31 20 525 6438          Plantage Muidergracht 24

 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Jurgen Bo » Sat, 02 Dec 1995 04:00:00




>any tar version changes the access date of any backuped file
>since it uses regular file system code to read files.
>in some environments thats not not allowed at all or at least not wishable.

Actually, GNU tar has an option to /not/ change the atime...

  $ tar --help
  ...
  Handling of file attributes:
        --atime-preserve         don't change access times on dumped files

however, I believe that with this option it changes the ctime instead
(because what it really does is set the atime back after reading the
file).  So you've got a good point there... hadn't thought about that.

-j

--

"Unix?  What's that?  Is that like Linux?"

 
 
 

dump,restore,rdump

Post by Lars Wirzeni » Sun, 03 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Quote:> In practice this is partly true.

If you're dumping a file while someone else is modifying it, you're
in trouble.  The chances of this happening in a quite system are low,
of course, but it can happen.

dump writes the size of a file to the beginning of the tape.  Then is
writes the contents of the file.  Things break if the file has changes
in size.

--


Publib 0.5: ftp://ftp.cs.helsinki.fi/pub/Software/Local/Publib/

 
 
 

1. Source for dump/restore/rdump/rrestore?

For those of you who saw my previous query regarding how to dump an NFS
partition, I've got my answer.  Basically Sun made a mistake in their
documentation, its not possible.  They told me that they have no plans to do
an rdump/rrestore to go with their dump/restore for the Fuji3480 tape drive.
They sold us half a package and we are getting our money back.

However, this still leaves me high and dry on using the Fuji3480 for backups.
What we would like to do now is write our own version of dump/restore/rdump/
rrestore to use here.  Is it possible to get any source to these utilities?
Sun said 'no' without a source license, then they happily offered to do the
programming for us, onsite (they don't have a drive), for what would run
about $50,000.  Does source exist anywhere in PD form?  If so, where can I
ftp it from?
--

                "I'm going under the table."  - Bernard Shaw


2. xwatch???

3. unix dump: dumped twice to same dumpfile; restore if file displays only last dump

4. how to peek at stdin status (getchar without blocking)

5. dump/rdump -- how dump big disks to smaller tapes?

6. Running SuitSpot on Linux?

7. help. restoring a backup dump/restore

8. BIOS problems!

9. 'r' option of restore (dump/restore)

10. Help with dump/restore ("Tape is not a dump tape")

11. Dump/Restore problem: multiple dumps per Travan 5 tape

12. dumping one Mac OS hd to another a la dump/restore

13. Problems with rdump/restore FreeBSD ==> SunOS/Solaris